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The Weight Loss Motivation Bible: How To Program Your Mind For Sustainable Fat Loss

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Tips For Better Cardio Workout Results –

1. Use your arms during carido 2. Don't push too hard, go longer. 3.Steady pace not interval (?) 4. Do more than 2 types of cardio 5. Cardio AFTER weights 6. Morning cardio before breakfast Source by seslater0594

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What Is Reiki, and Should You Try It?

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Have you heard of reiki? This “hot wellness trend” is actually an Japanese alternative medicine practice dating back to the early 1920s. With the rise of popularity of practices like acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, and natural healing like earthing and forest bathing, we wanted to know more about what reiki is and what makes it so special. So, we asked Christopher Tellez, reiki master at SF Reiki Center. Seems like a fitting expert, no?

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What Is Reiki?

“Reiki, pronounced ‘Ray-Key,’ means universal life energy. This life energy is all around us,” said Christopher. “With a special attunement process from the reiki master to student, the student can channel this life energy though the palms of their hands.”

As noted, “ki” is Japanese for energy — sound familiar? If you’re at all versed in traditional Chinese medicine or acupuncture, you’ll notice how similar “ki” is to “qi,” the Chinese word for energy. Just as acupuncture focuses on the qi, both of these alternative medicine practices are designed to aid in the flow of energy. The difference with reiki? No needles.

“Reiki is a gentle, noninvasive, hands-on technique of energy transfer from reiki practitioner to client,” said Christopher. In a reiki treatment, you’ll spend 60 to 90 minutes (depending on the provider) on a massage table or in a chair, fully clothed, and the practitioner (reiki master) will touch different points on your head, face, body, etc., either a light touch or with hands hovering above your body.

How Does It Work?

The concept is that good energy is transferred from the practitioner to the client. Here’s how he explained it: “The energy transfer vitalizes the body’s cells, tissues, organs, and emotional centers. By the end of a reiki treatment (front torso of body, head, and back of body), all body systems are operating in a stronger, more normal fashion. After reiki sessions, clients feel calm and deeply relaxed.”

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But if good energy is transferred from the practitioner to the client . . . what about “bad” energy transferring back to the reiki master? “Practitioners don’t take on their clients’ problems,” he said (that’s fortunate). “Energy flows only from the practitioner to the client. It never flows back into the practitioner to trouble them with the energy patterns of the client.”

“Practitioners feel better after a treatment than before they started,” he said. “Giving a reiki treatment increases the practitioner’s own vitality. Since practitioners are hands-on ‘transmitters,’ some of the energy flow is assimilated by them as they deliver the reiki treatment.”

You should keep in mind that reiki is not a massage — don’t go in expecting some deep tissue work.

Should You Try Reiki?

“Clients seek reiki services for physical, emotional, and spiritual healing for many reasons,” said Christopher. Here are some of the types of cases he treats at SF Reiki Center:

Balance of mental health (fear, anxiety, depression)
Rest and relaxation (stress reduction)
Letting go of grief and loss (changes around jobs, relationships, and loss of loved ones)
Preparing for surgery (pre and post)
Self-care practices for cancer and HIV (side effects of chemotherapy and HIV medications)
Creating big life changes (changing thought, belief patterns, conditions that are no longer working)

According to the International Association of Reiki Professionals, “Reiki is not a cure for a disease or illness.” That said, “It may assist the body in creating an environment to facilitate healing.” You can use reiki as “a complement to traditional medicine,” as it “is practiced in many hospitals and medical care settings.”

While reiki has yet to have the scientific backup like acupuncture (very little research has been done), it has been shown to have zero harmful effects or side effects. If you’ve experienced a life change (or are about to), if you’re trying to manage anxiety, or if you’re trying to give yourself a healthy start to 2017, why not give reiki a shot?

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B12 Shots: Should You Get One?

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More and more, ours is a worn out, sleep-deprived, distracted nation. It’s no wonder a shot of energy and focus would appeal to many of us. And that’s exactly what B12 injections deliver—literally—for those who lack sufficient stores of the nutrient.

“B vitamins are essential for proper cellular respiration,” explains Dr. Roxanne Sukol, medical director of Cleveland Clinic’s Wellness Enterprise. Without adequate supplies of B12, most of the cells in your body will struggle to take in enough oxygen, which can affect everything from your energy levels to your mood and concentration, Sukol says. Classic symptoms of a B12 deficiency also include diarrhea or constipation, pale skin, and shortness of breath, according to the National Institutes of Health.

The nutritional necessity of B12 explains why it’s such a popular supplement, and also why some celebrities have touted B12 injections as the magic ingredient in their health regimens. The vitamin’s links to increased energy have also made B12 popular among some dieters and weight loss clinics—the thinking being that more energy will translate to more exercise.

“But unless you have a B12 deficiency, there’s really no role for it,” Sukol says of B12 shots and supplements. Put simply, more isn’t better. And even if you’re low on B12, there’s no evidence injections of it will help you lose weight, says Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the complementary and integrative medicine program at Mayo Clinic. “Everybody’s looking for a shortcut,” he says. “B12 supplementation has its benefits, but it’s not a solution for weight loss.”

So weight loss is out, but B12 shots have been associated with other conditions, too. In fact, there’s some solid research on B12 injections for the treatment of fibromyalgia and myalgia encephalomyelitis.

Food sources of the vitamin include eggs, meat, and dairy products. People who eschew those foods are at elevated risk. “When I test vegans for B12, they’re usually on the low side—if not deficient,” Sukol says. Some gut-related diseases like Crohn’s or Celiac—as well as most types of weight loss surgery—can also limit the amount of B12 your system absorbs, she adds.

But figuring out if you’re low on B12 is trickier than you might suppose. A much-cited 2000 study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutritionfound nearly 40% of the population have B12 levels that fall at or below what experts consider the low end of normal. While you might assume anything in the “normal” range means you’re in good shape, Sukol says that’s not always the case.

“Blood tests are not always black and white the way we’d like them to be,” she says. “If I have a patient taking a lot of naps and complaining about poor concentration, I might recommend B12 supplementation even though the blood tests look normal.”

You’ll notice she says “supplementation” and not “injections.” Unless you have one of the above conditions that prevent your gut from breaking down and absorbing the vitamin, a B12 pill is as effective as a B12 poke, research suggests. Sukol agrees. “For many people, an oral supplement is just as good [as an injection].”

Finally, when it comes to the safety of both B12 injections and oral supplements, you don’t have much to worry about. “B12 is water soluble, and it’s generally safe even at very high doses,” Bauer explains. “You put a needle in your arm and there’s always the risk of swelling or pain at the site, but in the complementary medicine realm B12 is probably one of the safest things you could take.”

If you’re often worn out or foggy brained, even after a good night’s sleep, “take a B12 supplement for a week or two and see how you feel,” Sukol advises. If your fatigue persists, have your blood tested for nutrient deficiencies.

A B12 shot may be just what your doctor orders.

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

Also check out healthywithjodi.com

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Yes, Your Office's Open Floor Plan Is Ruining Your Productivity

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If you’ve had trouble concentrating in an open floor-plan office, you’re not alone. Now, at least you’ve got science on your side: A new study suggests that overheard work conversations can decrease productivity—and increase annoyance—of other employees within earshot, more so than random and meaningless background buzz.

Open office plans are becoming increasingly common in workplaces, allowing companies to optimize space and, theoretically, encourage dialogue and collaboration among employees. But they also have their fair share of critics, and complaints about lack of privacy and noisy coworkers abound.

It’s no surprise that noise can be distracting, but researchers from Yamaguchi University in Japan wanted to see how work-related chatter might compare with other, less meaningful hubbub. So they performed a series of experiments to investigate the impact of different types of noises, using a test known as the “odd-ball” paradigm.

During odd-ball tests, people are asked to identify unique events sprinkled throughout a series of repetitive events. “To complete the odd-ball task it is necessary to regulate attention to a stimulus," said Takahiro Tamesue, associate professor of engineering, explained in a press release.

In one experiment, participants watched pictures flashing on a computer monitor while listening to either pink noise (similar to white noise, but with a spectrum closely resembling that of human voices) or actual male and female speech. Over a 10-minute period, they were asked to count the number of times a red square appeared in a mix of otherwise similar objects.

In the second experiment, people were asked to count the instances of an infrequent 2-kilohertz tone amid a series of 1-kilohertz tones. Afterward, they were asked to rate their level of annoyance at each sound, on a scale of one to seven.

During these and other trials, researchers measured participants’ brain waves using electrodes on their scalps. They looked specifically at two responses known as the N100 and P300 components, which peak approximately 100 and 300 milliseconds after a stimulus (in this case, a sound) is presented. These are thought to represent the activation of neurons involved in analyzing and making decisions about incoming sensory information, Tamesue says.

The researchers found that when participants listened to meaningful speech, they experienced large reductions in their N100 and P300 components—indicating that their selective attention to thinking-related tasks was influenced by the noise. Other experiments also showed that meaningful noises, such as music and conversation, led to greater declines in performance on memory and arithmetic tasks.

And yes, you guessed it: Meaningful noises had a stronger effect on levels of annoyance, as well, compared to meaningless ones.

Tamesue's research focuses on improving environments by analyzing the physiological and psychological effects of noise. He presented his new study, which has not yet been peer-reviewed or published in a medical journal, at a joint meeting of the Acoustical Societies of America and Japan, occurring this week in Hawaii.

The findings suggest that settings used for cognitive tasks, such as workplaces and schools, could benefit from designs that take into account the sound that’s likely to be present, says Tamesue—not just the volume, he adds, but the meaningfulness, as well.

“Surrounding conversations often disturb the business operations conducted in such open offices,” he says. “Because it is difficult to soundproof an open office, a way to mask meaningful speech with some other sound would be of great benefit for achieving a comfortable sound environment.”

As for employees already stuck in a poorly designed office space? You could always don your headphones and crank up the white noise. Or, take a cue from other scientific research: Studies have shown that music without lyrics can enhance mental performance, and that natural sounds like a babbling mountain brook can be relaxing (and not distracting) in stressful workplaces.

This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

Also check out healthywithjodi.com

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The fit lifestyle with Cassey Ho

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Tired of starting a diet every summer of every other Monday? We chat to blogger Cassey Ho about how she stays fit and healthy all year round. Take note.

Aim for balance with food: I allow myself a YOLO (you only live once) meal once or twice a week. But the rest of the time I eat clean, enjoying lots of plant foods, fresh produce, grass-fed meats, wholegrains and unsweetened beverages. I try to eat carbs, protein and healthy fats at every meal to keep me full and energised. The one thing I minimise is dairy – it makes my skin break out. I also avoid foods high in sodium, saturated or unhealthy fats, chemicals and preservatives, additives and colours.

Lose the rules: Going on diets or strict meal plans just doesn’t work for me. I always crave the foods I’m missing out on, and once that ‘diet’ is over, I want to binge on the foods I was restricting. Over time, I’ve learned to eat in a balanced way – that way I no longer have crazy cravings for junk food that cause me to binge and feel guilty.

Avoid extremes: When I was prepping for my bikini competition several years ago, I was put on this crazy diet of only eating about 1000-to-1200 calories (around 4, 200kJ) a day while I was working out for four hours a day! As a result I felt tired, irritable, angry and frustrated. My mind was foggy and I couldn’t concentrate. I was labelling food as ‘good’ and ‘bad’ and felt like I was trapped in food jail. For eight to 10 weeks I endured this crazy plan. I did the bikini competition with my new, lean body, and then I decided to go back to ‘normal-healthy’. But when I tried to introduce a variety of foods back into my diet, like brown rice, quinoa and different types of protein, my body did not like that at all. It acted like a sponge, soaking everything up. 

For the next three years, I gradually gained weight. And there was nothing I could do to stop it. During this time, I was still working out really hard for about one hour a day, but my body just didn’t respond. It rebelled. It was seriously frustrating because in my mind, I was doing everything right. Diet and exercise should equal weight loss or at least weight maintenance. But because of the damage and stress that I put my body under during that bikini prep, my hormones became unbalanced and I am still getting back to normal.

Aim for more sleep and less stress: I learned a lot from my bikini comp experience. Cortisol, the stress hormone, increases when you significantly lower your kilojoules, over-exercise and/or don’t have enough sleep. And cortisol plays a role in increasing abdominal fat, more specifically, lower-belly fat. This stress also decreases leptin, the hormone that controls your appetite. So you feel extra hungry all the time and it’s likely that you may crave those carbs and high-fat foods. That’s exactly what happened to me. Getting enough sleep, eating sufficient kilojoules and taking time to de-stress and relax are really important for your waistline and wellbeing.

Treat yourself: When you deprive yourself of cake or ice-cream, you start to think about them all the time and that leads to bingeing. Instead, I allow myself treats – in moderation. And because I know I can have them from time to time, I don’t crave them or eat more of them than I should.

Focus on health, not weight: I rarely step on the scales anymore because I know that my weight does not tell me how strong or fast I am. When I’m at my healthiest, I can tell by how I feel. When I am consistent with my diet and workouts, I am happy, motivated and energised. When I start to feel sluggish and drained, I know that my eating habits may be off and my workouts aren’t as routine – so I address that.

Use the seasons: What I love about the changing seasons is that they allow me to prepare myself for fresh beginnings four times a year. So with each season I see a chance to refocus and find a new rhythm and routine to optimise my health goals. I also try to rediscover delicious seasonal flavours to keep my clean-eating habits on track.

Keep exercise simple: You don’t need big shiny equipment to work out. Simply walking or taking the stairs can help you lose weight and maintain a healthy body. There are also endless exercises you can perform at home to sculpt your best body. For my POP Pilates exercise I just use a yoga mat to cushion my body against the floor. Then all the exercises use my own body weight to stay fit. If you’re not enjoying your exercise routine, try something else. Exercise should never be a chore – it should be something you always look forward to and then you don’t want to skip it. You shouldn’t have to work for hours a day to enjoy results. When I started combining HIIT with POP Pilates in my new PIIT (Pilates intense interval training) program my body strengthened and increased endurance like never before – and it’s only 28 minutes a day!

Head over to Cassey Ho’s Instagram for more!

 

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Love Ashley Graham? Here Are 9 Other Body-Positive Activists You Should Follow Too 

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Boosting your own body confidence starts with knowing you’re not the only one with cellulite, stomach rolls, or any other totally normal imperfections. That’s why seeing daily Instagram and Snapchat posts from body positive activists like Ashley Graham can be an instant mood- and confidence-booster—they show that health, beauty, and fitness come in all sizes. Here, we share our favorite curvy-girl role models who serve up lots of fierce full-body shots, sweaty gym mirror pictures, and the occasional selfie. Trust us, you’ll want to follow them all.

Candice Huffine

You may know Huffine as the first plus-size model to grace the pages of the iconic and risqué Pirelli calendar. Besides serving up super sexy editorial shots, she shares photos of her doing her favorite form of fitness—running. Huffine religiously uses the hashtag #getmovinghavefun, so her posts are sure to lift your spirits.

 

Nadia Aboulhosn

Have trouble fitting into those straight-sized Lululemon leggings? You and your booty will love model, fashion blogger, and designer Nadia Aboulhosn. She recently launched a fierce clothing line with Canadian plus-size brand Additionelle and isn’t afraid to make out-of-the-box fashion decisions. One scroll through her Instagram and you’ll want to be rocking body-con dresses, athleisure-inspired bodysuits, and short-shorts just like Aboulhosn does.

 

RELATED: Ashley Graham Has Something to Say About Her Body

Katie Willcox

If you feel like skinny girls are the only ones being portrayed as healthy on your social feeds, it’s time to give Katie a follow. She’s a model and the CEO and founder of Healthy Is the New Skinny, a movement that focuses on health and wellness rather than size. She posts lots of workout clips (even when she was pregnant!), and inspiring body-positive messages.

 

Bo Stanley

Surfer chick Stanley will have you feeling empowered by what your body can do, rather than what it looks like. Her Instagram is filled with beachy bikini photos, action shots of her surfing, and outdoor strength training and yoga videos. Stanely will inspire you to do what you love, regardless of what you look like doing it and most importantly, she’ll remind you to make working out fun.

 

Leah Kelley

This model isn’t afraid to speak out against the modeling industry’s unfair body standards. Her honesty will leave you feeling empowered to live a healthy lifestyle while loving your body. Plus, her second Instagram account, thickandtoned, features all of her go-to workouts—all the fitspo you need.

 

Denise Bidot

This curvalicious model recently launched her own self-love campaign, called There Is No Wrong Way to Be a Woman. Whether she’s showing off her stretch marks, posting the occasional workout photo, or snapping adorable selfies with her daughter, Bidot proves a woman can be anyone she wants to be—and that message is infectious as any.

 

RELATED: This Is What Happens to Your Body When You Stop Exercising

Tara Lynn

Plus-sized model Tara Lynn proves curves are always in style thanks to her mix of high-fashion editorial and behind-the-scenes snapshots. She consistently shares the hasthag #FashionDemocracy and believes women of all sizes should have access to fun clothing options. Trust us—you’ll want to take lots of fashion risks after scrolling through Lynn’s feed.

 

Marquita Pring

If being close friends with Ashley Graham isn’t enough to convince you to follow this model, her upbeat, fun-loving posts are sure to do the trick. Hit "follow" and your feed will be filled with fierce runway walks, workout sessions, and Pring-Graham best friend moments.

 

Jessamyn Stanley

In a world where women are often shamed for having belly fat, Stanley reminds us there’s nothing wrong with having a little more in the middle, and even to own our figures. The inspiring yogi proves size and shape don’t matter when it comes to practicing your favorite form of exercise. Follow her to flood your feed with expert-level yoga poses, rants that question fit-girl stereotypes, and overall body-positive realness.

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See What It’s Like to Be Color Blind With These Eye-Opening Gifs

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Imagine a sunflower that’s slightly blue. Or a stop sign that’s not red. These may be everyday sights for a person who's color blind—which means they perceive wavelengths of light differently than most people.

“Color blindness is usually inherited,” says Jessica Lattman, MD, a New York City-based ophthalmologist. Several genes are needed to make the color-detecting molecules, or photopigments, in the cone-shaped cells of the retina (known as cone cells). Abnormalities in those genes can lead to difficulty seeing reds and greens, or blues and yellows—or in rare cases, an inability to see any color at all.

“Because most forms of the disorder are linked to the X chromosome, [it] affects men far more commonly than women,” says Dr. Lattman. It's estimated that 8% of men and just 0.5% of women of Northern European descent have the common type, red-green blindness.

While there’s no cure for color blindness, treatments do exist: “Some people find that wearing tinted glasses helps them detect colors better," Dr. Lattman says. "And there are actually smartphone apps now that allow people to take a picture of something and be informed of what color it is.”

To show how color blindness can affect a person's view of the world, the UK site Clinic Compare created the eight GIFs below. Each one portrays a different type of the disorder.

RELATED: These GIFs Show What It’s Really Like to Have Glaucoma and Other Eye Problems

Red-Green Color Blindness

Red-weakness (protanomaly)

Red-weakness—in which reds, oranges, and yellows appear greener and less bright—doesn't tend to interfere with a person's daily life. About 1% of men have this mild, X-linked type, according to the National Eye Institute.

Red-blindness (protanopia)

Also affecting about 1% of men, red-blindness means red appears back; and shades of orange, yellow, and green may register as yellow. 

Green-weakness (deuteranomaly)

Green-weakness is the most common form of color blindness, says Dr. Lattman. Five percent of men have it. To them, yellow and green appear redder; and blue and violet look the same.

Green-blindness (deuteranopia)

With this X-linked type affecting 1 in 100 men, greens appear beige; and reds look brownish-yellow. 

 

Blue-Yellow Color Blindness 

Blue-weakness (tritanomaly)

"Tritantomaly is very rare," says Dr. Lattman, "and it affects both men and women equally." A blue-weakness, this form of color blindness makes blue appear greener. It also makes it tough to differentiate yellow and red from pink.

Blue-blindness (tritanopia)

Blue-blindness is extremely rare, and also occurs in both men and women. People with tritanopia see blue as green; and yellow as violet or light grey.

 

Complete Color Blindness

Cone monochromacy

There are three types of photopigments—red, blue and green. But in people who have cone monochromacy, two of the three aren't functional. People with blue cone monochromacy (shown above) are often also near-sighted and have reduced sharpness in their vision, says Dr. Lattman. 

Red monochromacy (achromatopsia)

In people who have monochromacy, the most severe type of color blindness, none of the photopigments are functional. "These people see the world exclusively in black, white, and grey," Dr. Lattman says. They also tend to be very sensitive to bright light. 

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How to Survive a Quarter-Life Crisis and Find Your True Purpose

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During my quarter-life crisis, I felt paralyzed to make a change. I felt like I was at the intersection of hopeless, stuck, and FOMO (or fear of missing out).

I said to myself, “I hate my job and I want to do something else, but I don’t know where to start. I’m interested in so many things, but none of them seem perfect. All my friends on Facebook are so happy and successful. My friend is a Forbes 30 Under 30. My buddy is traveling around Thailand. My friend just got engaged. I’m tired of being single. I’m a failure.”

Everything feels impossible during a quarter-life crisis, even small decisions like which shampoo to buy, or which show to watch on Netflix. 

But the five simple steps below helped me get through that period of intense confusion—and eventually, find my true purpose. I hope these tips will be helpful as you discover yours.

Stop the comparisons

Social media has made it all but impossible to avoid comparing yourself to others. We see only the coolest parts of our friends’ lives, like when they get a new job, fall in love, or travel somewhere beautiful. We think, “Wow, I really need to get my act together.”  All of us are figuring it out, even our friends whose Instagram grass looks really green. All of us are on different paths, with no right or wrong answer. Comparing yourself to others is a waste of time. Stop worrying about what other people think and start figuring out what you want.

RELATED: Elizabeth Gilbert Shares Her Secrets to Living a More Creative Life

Pursue what’s meaningful to you

If you want to turn your quarter-life crisis into a breakthrough, you have to stop focusing on everyone else’s noise, and start asking yourself why you’re here. What do you care most about? What do you want to do for the world? What are you really good at? What types of people do you want to surround yourself with? How much money do you need to live your desired lifestyle? I call this finding alignment between who you are and how you’re spending your days.

Turn your doubt into action

When I was stuck in my old job, fear of the unknown often kept me up all night. This doubt never really goes away, but I’ve learned that we can turn our doubts into research, into positive energy that takes us closer to our next lily pad. If you write your doubts and fears on paper, you can begin to take tangible action steps toward figuring out what’s next in your life. This might mean reading a book that interests you, signing up for a class, launching a crowdfunding campaign for a creative project, starting a blog, attending a cool conference or event, traveling somewhere you always wanted to go, having coffee with a mentor, or pursuing an apprenticeship or volunteer opportunity that excites you.

Find a community of people who believe in the beauty of your dreams

Surviving a quarter-life crisis is the result of both hard work and finding the right people to support your journey. You can’t do it alone. Building a community of believers is the difference between your breakthrough being a dream and a dream come true. So, start finding people who make you better. People who inspire you; who are creative, who are living for others, who hold you accountable. Depending on where you live, believers might be easy or incredibly difficult to find. Attend conferences, ask your network for ideas, and use social media to find local meet-up groups based on your interests.

RELATED: 8 Promises Every Woman Should Make to Herself

Practice weekly self-care rituals

When I was stuck in my quarter-life crisis, overworked and stressed, I definitely wasn’t taking care myself—and I got shingles! I didn’t give myself time to eat well, see friends, meditate, write in my journal, or exercise. If you don’t take care of your body, it’s nearly impossible to reach your goals or help anyone else reach theirs. Finding your purpose doesn’t translate to applying to as many to jobs online as you possibly can. Finding your purpose means spending time doing the things you love, with the people you love most. It also means learning how to be kind to yourself. So, what are three things you can do to be kind to yourself this week? Think about ways you can treat yourself, take care of yourself, and create yourself.

If you’re lucky, practicing self-love might even bring you closer to the purpose you’ve been searching for.

Adapted from The Quarter-Life Breakthrough: Invent Your Own Path, Find Meaningful Work, and Build a Life That Matters by Adam Smiley Poswolsky, available from TarcherPerigee/Penguin Random House. Subscribe for more career resources at smileyposwolsky.com.

 

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