Weight Loss 

frokenem: It’s my two year anniversary of my Gastric Bypass surgery tod…

frokenem: It’s my two year anniversary of my Gastric Bypass surgery today! I am so happy with myself! I love every part! I still have my curves and I don’t feel the need to lose them. I’m happy and healthy! Yey for me! That’s almost 140 pounds lost! Wow. (Over 60kg weight loss for our Metric friends.) Source by glorybeedesigns

Read More
Weight Loss 

Weight Loss Simulator

Hilary’s plan is to lose 163 lbs. She ALREADY lost 105 lbs and has 58 more lbs to go to reach her goal weight. Read about the day before her surgery modelmydiet.tumbl… Source by modelmydiet

Read More
Fat Loss 

fatloss.digimkts.com I thought I’d never find something like this. WOW check her…

fatloss.digimkts.com I thought I’d never find something like this. WOW check her arms out… Great before and after.. Save on having surgery.. Click on picture if you want more info Source by getyouhealth

Read More
Fat Loss 

A Woman on a Mission….: Before/After Bathing Suit Pics and Blood Work Results

Biotin for hair loss after surgery. A Woman on a Mission….: Before/After Bathing Suit Pics and Blood Work Results. Vitamins for gastric bypass. Bariatric surgery. Source by bumbblebe

Read More

Amanda's Secret to Losing Over 100 Pounds Wasn't a Diet

www.popsugar.com/fitness/130-Pound-Weight-Loss-Story-37209787

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

Our next Before & After story comes from Amanda Fraijo-Tobin, who blogs about life after losing 130 pounds on her blog Friday Love Song, which is part of our POPSUGAR Select Fitness network. Below, she shares how she lost the weight and how she keeps it off.

Amanda: Before

Growing up, I wasn’t severely overweight — sure, I had a pudgy stage, but a lot of people did! My weight wasn’t something I thought much about being a kid (as it shouldn’t be). My parents had good intentions, like most, but we certainly did not grow up eating very healthy. Snacks, soda, meals prepared without nutritional aspects considered. Soda became a very bad habit for me, especially as I got into my teens and didn’t have anyone stopping me from drinking so many.

Fast-forward to high school — like most high school girls, I thought I was fat. Even though, in retrospect, I clearly wasn’t. I didn’t let it consume my life, though I was a little on the chubby side (so I thought) and I was OK with that. Looking back, I think senior year is when the trouble began for me. Stress, changes in my life, poor eating, and not exercising (hello, gym-class-not-required-after-ninth-grade!) led me to pack on some weight. Again, I already felt like a “fat girl,” so I kept going with the mind-set of “This is me — this is who I am.” I was married young, had my first child at 20, and of course, packed on more weight. Divorced, remarried, and two more babies later — more weight.

42466972

My weight wasn’t something I paid attention to. I never weighed myself. The only time anyone took my weight was maybe once or twice a year when I had a doctor’s visit — and even then, I didn’t think much about it. This is me — this is who I am . . .

Amanda: Before

My husband is a type 2 diabetic. He had already been on tons of medications for several years to control his blood sugar and other problems associated with the disease. He got to the point of having to add insulin injections to his enormous list of meds. His doctor kept urging him to consider weight-loss surgery, telling him that, if he lost some weight, there was a possibility he may be able to stop taking some of his medications. This seemed like a great solution to my husband — I, on the other hand, disagreed. I told him repeatedly, this wasn’t the solution. If you don’t break bad habits that got you to a certain point, you could not possibly make a real change.

37137563

Insert light bulb moment. Pot calling kettle black. Even though it wasn’t something I monitored, I was surely at the heaviest point of my life. I was waking up to get my son to school and collapsing on the couch for a nap once he was off. I was having random pains in my foot. I felt gross. I knew I needed to start making changes. I needed to make changes for myself, but also for my husband, for my kids. I needed to be a better example. This wasn’t about vanity. This was about life, making a better life for myself and my family.

I knew this wasn’t going to be easy. I had packed on the weight over the course of 10 years. I knew it was going to take some time to take it back off. I knew there would be times I would feel like quitting. But from the start, I adopted a “Today I will do what I can” kind of attitude. This went for exercise as well as eating habits. I knew all my bad eating habits were not going to disappear overnight. Slowly but surely, I made mental lists of things I was doing that were awful for my body and thought of ways to change them. Drink more water, read labels of items I was eating, etc. I had been having such severe pains in my heel that some days I could not even walk on it. Some days, I may not get through an entire workout like I wanted to — that’s OK. Today I will do what I can.

Amanda: After

I chose not to be vocal about my weight-loss journey from the start. I didn’t mention it to friends. My husband and my father were about the only people who knew what I was trying to accomplish. There were many days of whining on my part to my husband about aches and pains from making my body do things it wasn’t used to doing. I admit I have no idea for sure what my starting weight was. I have a general idea based on the last time I had been weighed at the doctors — but my journey began about six months, and what I’m guessing, may even be more pounds later. I did not start out with a goal weight in mind. I didn’t want one. I wanted to be healthier. Period. Healthy is not pounds on a scale. This is not a short fix; this is a change I will continue to make for the rest of my life.

36140494

How Did I Do It?

This is common sense, things we have heard a million times again and again. Change the way you eat. Exercise. Repeat. It’s amazing to me when people want to know my “secret.” I have no secret. And I find it even funnier when people feel let down by my answer. There is no magic pill. I have not dieted. I have not counted calories. I knew from the start that was not the way I wanted to live my life. This is a lifestyle change. Know that it’s going to be challenging, but have faith that you can make the changes you want to.

Amanda: After

About two years later now and around 125 to 135 pounds down, here I am. Still chugging along. Still making it part of my life to make better decisions for my own as well as my family’s health. Honestly, I still feel a little silly writing this. I have had people tell me that they think I am an inspiration, which blows my mind. But I am here to tell you: if I can do this, you can do this. All it takes is a true commitment. Am I a superfit person? No, of course not. But every day, I strive to be a little better. I am a real person who did this. I am a mom to three children with a full-time job, a husband, two dogs, and a million other things going on. It takes work. It takes time. But you can do this. Start today, one small change at a time. This is me — this is who I am. Today I will do what I can. Will you?

Do you have an inspiring Before & After story to share? Message us on Facebook, and give us a few details about your journey. We might even profile you on the site, like Amanda!

Read More

Surgeons Perform First Uterus Transplant in the U.S.

www.judgeweightloss.com/bikinibutt

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

TIME-logo.jpg

The first uterus transplant in the U.S. was performed this week by surgeons at the Cleveland Clinic, the hospital announced.

The 26-year-old woman who received the transplant is in stable condition after the nine-hour procedure, which took place on Wednesday. The hospital is not releasing further details about the woman.

The goal of the surgery is to allow women born without a uterus, or women who had theirs removed, to become pregnant and have a baby. This is the first time this surgery has taken place in the U.S. In Sweden, nine women have undergone the operation and at least four of those women have given birth.

The Cleveland Clinic said in a statement that the uterus came from a deceased organ donor. The woman who received the transplant will likely have to take anti-rejection medication for a long time to ensure the procedure is a success.

The hospital says it is continuing to screen possible transplant candidates.

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

Also check out healthywithjodi.com

Read More

What Is Reiki, and Should You Try It?

www.popsugar.com/fitness/What-Reiki-42843114

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

Have you heard of reiki? This “hot wellness trend” is actually an Japanese alternative medicine practice dating back to the early 1920s. With the rise of popularity of practices like acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, and natural healing like earthing and forest bathing, we wanted to know more about what reiki is and what makes it so special. So, we asked Christopher Tellez, reiki master at SF Reiki Center. Seems like a fitting expert, no?

42805848

What Is Reiki?

“Reiki, pronounced ‘Ray-Key,’ means universal life energy. This life energy is all around us,” said Christopher. “With a special attunement process from the reiki master to student, the student can channel this life energy though the palms of their hands.”

As noted, “ki” is Japanese for energy — sound familiar? If you’re at all versed in traditional Chinese medicine or acupuncture, you’ll notice how similar “ki” is to “qi,” the Chinese word for energy. Just as acupuncture focuses on the qi, both of these alternative medicine practices are designed to aid in the flow of energy. The difference with reiki? No needles.

“Reiki is a gentle, noninvasive, hands-on technique of energy transfer from reiki practitioner to client,” said Christopher. In a reiki treatment, you’ll spend 60 to 90 minutes (depending on the provider) on a massage table or in a chair, fully clothed, and the practitioner (reiki master) will touch different points on your head, face, body, etc., either a light touch or with hands hovering above your body.

How Does It Work?

The concept is that good energy is transferred from the practitioner to the client. Here’s how he explained it: “The energy transfer vitalizes the body’s cells, tissues, organs, and emotional centers. By the end of a reiki treatment (front torso of body, head, and back of body), all body systems are operating in a stronger, more normal fashion. After reiki sessions, clients feel calm and deeply relaxed.”

40114160

But if good energy is transferred from the practitioner to the client . . . what about “bad” energy transferring back to the reiki master? “Practitioners don’t take on their clients’ problems,” he said (that’s fortunate). “Energy flows only from the practitioner to the client. It never flows back into the practitioner to trouble them with the energy patterns of the client.”

“Practitioners feel better after a treatment than before they started,” he said. “Giving a reiki treatment increases the practitioner’s own vitality. Since practitioners are hands-on ‘transmitters,’ some of the energy flow is assimilated by them as they deliver the reiki treatment.”

You should keep in mind that reiki is not a massage — don’t go in expecting some deep tissue work.

Should You Try Reiki?

“Clients seek reiki services for physical, emotional, and spiritual healing for many reasons,” said Christopher. Here are some of the types of cases he treats at SF Reiki Center:

Balance of mental health (fear, anxiety, depression)
Rest and relaxation (stress reduction)
Letting go of grief and loss (changes around jobs, relationships, and loss of loved ones)
Preparing for surgery (pre and post)
Self-care practices for cancer and HIV (side effects of chemotherapy and HIV medications)
Creating big life changes (changing thought, belief patterns, conditions that are no longer working)

According to the International Association of Reiki Professionals, “Reiki is not a cure for a disease or illness.” That said, “It may assist the body in creating an environment to facilitate healing.” You can use reiki as “a complement to traditional medicine,” as it “is practiced in many hospitals and medical care settings.”

While reiki has yet to have the scientific backup like acupuncture (very little research has been done), it has been shown to have zero harmful effects or side effects. If you’ve experienced a life change (or are about to), if you’re trying to manage anxiety, or if you’re trying to give yourself a healthy start to 2017, why not give reiki a shot?

Read More

B12 Shots: Should You Get One?

www.judgeweightloss.com

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

More and more, ours is a worn out, sleep-deprived, distracted nation. It’s no wonder a shot of energy and focus would appeal to many of us. And that’s exactly what B12 injections deliver—literally—for those who lack sufficient stores of the nutrient.

“B vitamins are essential for proper cellular respiration,” explains Dr. Roxanne Sukol, medical director of Cleveland Clinic’s Wellness Enterprise. Without adequate supplies of B12, most of the cells in your body will struggle to take in enough oxygen, which can affect everything from your energy levels to your mood and concentration, Sukol says. Classic symptoms of a B12 deficiency also include diarrhea or constipation, pale skin, and shortness of breath, according to the National Institutes of Health.

The nutritional necessity of B12 explains why it’s such a popular supplement, and also why some celebrities have touted B12 injections as the magic ingredient in their health regimens. The vitamin’s links to increased energy have also made B12 popular among some dieters and weight loss clinics—the thinking being that more energy will translate to more exercise.

“But unless you have a B12 deficiency, there’s really no role for it,” Sukol says of B12 shots and supplements. Put simply, more isn’t better. And even if you’re low on B12, there’s no evidence injections of it will help you lose weight, says Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the complementary and integrative medicine program at Mayo Clinic. “Everybody’s looking for a shortcut,” he says. “B12 supplementation has its benefits, but it’s not a solution for weight loss.”

So weight loss is out, but B12 shots have been associated with other conditions, too. In fact, there’s some solid research on B12 injections for the treatment of fibromyalgia and myalgia encephalomyelitis.

Food sources of the vitamin include eggs, meat, and dairy products. People who eschew those foods are at elevated risk. “When I test vegans for B12, they’re usually on the low side—if not deficient,” Sukol says. Some gut-related diseases like Crohn’s or Celiac—as well as most types of weight loss surgery—can also limit the amount of B12 your system absorbs, she adds.

But figuring out if you’re low on B12 is trickier than you might suppose. A much-cited 2000 study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutritionfound nearly 40% of the population have B12 levels that fall at or below what experts consider the low end of normal. While you might assume anything in the “normal” range means you’re in good shape, Sukol says that’s not always the case.

“Blood tests are not always black and white the way we’d like them to be,” she says. “If I have a patient taking a lot of naps and complaining about poor concentration, I might recommend B12 supplementation even though the blood tests look normal.”

You’ll notice she says “supplementation” and not “injections.” Unless you have one of the above conditions that prevent your gut from breaking down and absorbing the vitamin, a B12 pill is as effective as a B12 poke, research suggests. Sukol agrees. “For many people, an oral supplement is just as good [as an injection].”

Finally, when it comes to the safety of both B12 injections and oral supplements, you don’t have much to worry about. “B12 is water soluble, and it’s generally safe even at very high doses,” Bauer explains. “You put a needle in your arm and there’s always the risk of swelling or pain at the site, but in the complementary medicine realm B12 is probably one of the safest things you could take.”

If you’re often worn out or foggy brained, even after a good night’s sleep, “take a B12 supplement for a week or two and see how you feel,” Sukol advises. If your fatigue persists, have your blood tested for nutrient deficiencies.

A B12 shot may be just what your doctor orders.

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

Also check out healthywithjodi.com

Read More

This New Patch Can Monitor Patient’s Vital Signs With High Accuracy

www.judgeweightloss.com

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

Hospital patients could have their vital signs tracked without cumbersome wires and complex monitors once a new startup’s wearable monitoring patch hits the market.

VitalConnect is building a lightweight, disposable patch that can be affixed to a patient’s chest and wirelessly sends vital signs including heart rate, ECG read out and rate of breathing to a mobile app. The patch has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and provides clinical grade accuracy in monitoring, the company said.

“It is very small, comfortable and fully disposable,” Dr. Nersi Nazari, VitalConnect’s CEO, said on Wednesday during a demonstration at the Fortune Brainstorm Health conference. One patch can be worn for four to five days and can survive getting wet in the shower, he noted.

The patch, which could also be worn by patients at home, has the ability to detect if the wearer has fallen down. If a fall is detected, the patch can wirelessly notify a doctor or other party.

VitalConnect is also developing a cloud-based service to analyze the health data collected by the patches. The software ultimately could help physicians decide how to treat a patient or decide when the patient is ready to be discharged from the hospital, Nazari said.

For more about medical wearables, see: Can a Wearable Fitness Device Predict Your Heart Attack?

“The data is sliced and diced and analyzed to the condition that the doctor is looking at,” Nazari explained. “We do not want to bombard doctors with so much data that it’s just not useful.”

VitalConnect, founded in 2011, is seeking to combine expertise in bioengineering and data analytics. Nazari previously worked on semiconductor chip design at Marvell Semiconductor. Joseph Roberson, the company’s chief medical officer, was formerly chief of otology-neurotology-skull base surgery at Stanford University.

 

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com.

Read More

Common Eye Problems, Solved

www.judgeweightloss.com

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

Thanks to new technology—from disposable contacts to LASIK—it has never been easier to guarantee perfect vision without having to wear clunky specs or reading glasses. (And even if frames are your thing, you can get trendy ones cheaper than ever through mail-order sites, like warbyparker.com.) The latest science can also keep unsightly crow's-feet and dark circles at bay.

But while it's great to look and see better, you want your eyes to feel better, too, whether it's by preventing itchy, watery allergy symptoms or staving off age-related eye diseases. So we went on a vision quest to round up the tests, treatments and warning signs you need to know about so you'll see clearly into your next decade and beyond.

Problem No. 1: Presbyopia

The lowdown. Presbyopia—difficulty making out close objects, like writing on a menu or digits on a phone—usually sets in by the time you're 40. That's because, as you age, the lens of your eye gradually starts to lose flexibility. (Farsightedness, or hyperopia, has a similar effect but is due to the shape of your eye and is usually something you're born with.) Unfortunately, there's nothing you can do to prevent it.

What it feels like. Your vision is blurred at a normal distance. You may also notice eye strain and headaches when you're doing close-up work, like sewing.

Rx. Although presbyopia is a natural condition, you should still see your eye doctor when you notice it to make sure you don't have a more serious condition, like glaucoma, says Bruce Rosenthal, MD, professor of ophthalmology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. If it is presbyopia, he'll likely recommend reading glasses. Already wear glasses or contacts? Relax: You won't have to switch to old-fashioned granny glasses, thanks to new bifocal contact lenses and glasses known as no-line bifocals, which use progressive, multifocus lenses and look like regular specs.

Problem No. 2: Allergic conjunctivitis

The lowdown. If you have seasonal allergies, you recognize this as the annoying redness and itchiness that afflict your eyes in response to pollen from grass, trees or ragweed. You might also get these symptoms if you're allergic to pet dander or mold. "When the allergen comes into contact with your eyes, it causes cells known as mast cells to release histamine and other substances," causing swelling and wateriness, explains Richard Weber, MD, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

What it feels like. Itchy, red, watery eyes. You might also have other allergy symptoms, like sneezing.

Rx. An eye doctor or an allergist can prescribe prescription antihistamine eyedrops and, if needed, oral antihistamines (available either over-the-counter or by prescription). "Just avoid over-the-counter redness drops—they work by constricting blood vessels in your eye, and you can develop a rebound effect—when you stop using them, the vessels dilate again," Dr. Weber says.

 

Next Page: Dry eye syndrome

[ pagebreak ]

Problem No. 3: Dry eye syndrome

The lowdown. This condition occurs when you don't naturally produce enough tears to lubricate your peepers. "It's very common among women in their late 30s and early 40s, probably because of hormonal changes such as a decrease in estrogen and testosterone production leading into perimenopause," says Robert Cykiert, MD, an ophthalmologist at NYU Langone Medical Center. Certain meds—like antidepressants, antihistamines and decongestants—can also dry out your eyes, as can cold outdoor air.

What it feels like. A scratchy, gritty sensation. You may also have red eyes and blurred vision.

Rx. You can usually treat mild symptoms with an over-the-counter, preservative-free artificial tear solution, like Alcon's. If that doesn't work, see your eye doctor, who can prescribe eyedrops called Restasis. Wear contacts? Consider switching to daily disposables: One study found they improved dry eye by about 20 percent. For severe cases, your doc might recommend prescription eye inserts, which release a lubricant. You can also take an omega-3 supplement, which research suggests may ease symptoms, adds Jimmy Lee, MD, director of refractive surgery at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City.

Problem No. 4: Conjunctivitis

The lowdown. We're talking about pinkeye—inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, a thin layer of tissue that lines the inside of your eyelid. The most common cause is a virus, usually an adenovirus—the same type that causes respiratory infections. There's also bacterial conjunctivitis, caused by staph bacteria from contaminated eye makeup or touching your eye with germy hands.

What it feels like. One or both eyes will be red, puffy, painful and swollen. The viral kind produces watery discharge, while a bacterial infection usually leads to thick, yellowish-green gunk.

Rx. See your eye doctor promptly, since these symptoms can also indicate a corneal infection. If it's viral, your eyes should revert back to normal within a week or two, though your doctor can prescribe steroid eyedrops for relief if you're in serious pain. Bacterial pinkeye usually clears up with a course of prescription antibiotic drops.

 

 

 

Read More