Fat Loss Weight Loss 

Rebound Free Weight Loss: Strategies To Break The Cycle Of Yo-Yo Dieting

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Fat Loss Weight Loss 

The Weight Loss Motivation Bible: How To Program Your Mind For Sustainable Fat Loss

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Stop Weight Loss Resistance: Strategies To Break Through Weight Loss Resistance

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How to Kill Your Sugar Addiction Before It Kills You

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While excusing yourself from sugary celebrations is no fun, neither is dealing with a post-sugar-binge hangover. And on top of it, the more sugar you eat, the more you crave — it can take a few days to weeks to get over an addiction to refined sugar once you start. Not only that, but studies have shown that eating too much refined sugar can speed up your body’s aging process. If you know you can’t resist sweet temptations, read on to learn nutritionist-approved strategies that will keep you on the right track.

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Choose wisely: If you’re going to indulge, go for seasonal sweets that you know you can’t get when it’s not the holidays. “You can have chocolate any time of the year,” says registered dietitian, nutritionist, and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics spokesperson Tamara Melton. Go for a seasonal dessert you crave all year, like a treat from an ice cream truck in the Summer or pumpkin pie in the Fall. Just remember that just because these treats are only available for a limited time doesn’t mean you should go overboard. Practice portion control by having a plan, Tamara advises.

Think positive: Set yourself up for success by telling yourself that you got this. “Words are powerful,” says Kathie Dolgin, author of Sugar Savvy Solution: Kick Your Sugar Addiction for Life and Get Healthy. “If you think resisting sugar is going to be hard, it will be hard. Change that negative self-talk if you are going to take control of your diet and your health. Believe you can do this!”

Not being hungry is key: Don’t want to chow down on the entire candy bowl? Set yourself up for success by eating a balanced meal or snack every three to four hours, Tamara says. Simone Gloger, a registered nutritionist and Dukan Diet nutritionist, recommends three protein-rich meals and two protein-rich snacks every day to help you resist cravings. “I usually pack my lunch and snacks each day so I don’t give into the temptation that is all around me,” Simone says.

Know that cravings might be something else: Before you reach for that peanut butter cup, think about what you really need. “People mistake thirst for hunger or cravings,” Kathie says. “That dip in energy that sends you hunting for a snack is often just a sign of dehydration. So hydrate and hydrate and drink water, not juice or soda.” Kathie recommends spa water — water infused with your favorite fruits — to hit sugar cravings the natural way. If you are craving a treat, opt for a small piece of dark chocolate or a single-serving yogurt that comes with sweet mix-ins like chocolate or granola, Tamara advises.

Don’t dwell: Tried your best, but couldn’t resist the siren song of holiday treats? Don’t beat yourself up about it. “Forgive yourself and get back on track,” Kathie says. “Forgiving and being kind to others (as well as yourself!) boosts self-esteem and gratitude for what you have (thus combating the negative self-talk that can send you running for the cookie jar) and gives you the same endorphin rush as sugar.” Afterward, make sure your next meal is only when you are hungry, Tamara says. “Resolve to eat healthier at your next meal, then load up on plenty of fiber-rich foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains. Be sure to also include lean sources of protein, which help to keep you satisfied.”

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Take a Deep Breath: Inhaling the Right Way May Improve Your Memory

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When it comes to coping with scary or stressful situations, mental health experts have long given a simple piece of advice: Take a deep breath in through the nose, and out through the mouth. Now, new research suggests that this particular breathing technique really does impact brain activity—and can even improve your memory. 

Northwestern University researchers recruited about 100 young adults, some of whom were asked to make snap judgments about facial expressions that flashed quickly across a computer screen. Breathing did affect their performance: When people were inhaling through their noses, they were able to recognize faces expressing fear faster than when they were exhaling. In another test, researchers looked at participants' ability to remember objects flashing on the screen. Here, too, they were more likely to remember objects if they encountered them during inhales, versus during exhales. 

When mouth-breathing, all these effects disappeared.

The new study is the first to show that the rhythm of breathing creates electrical activity in the brain, according to the report, which was published in The Journal of Neuroscience.

Related: 20 Weird Ways Breathing Right Can Improve Your Life

“Our data is preliminary, but exciting,” says lead author Christina Zelano, PhD, assistant professor of neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, to Health. “And though it is too preliminary at this stage, it has the potential to lead to some deliberate breathing strategies for cognitive enhancement.”

She says that one of the study’s major findings is that nasal inhaling causes a “dramatic difference” in areas of the brain related to emotional processing (the amygdala) and memory (the hippocampus), compared with exhaling.

Researchers discovered that when you breathe in, you're stimulating neurons in the olfactory cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus, all across the limbic system. 

Related: 12 Unexpected Things that Mess With Your Memory

Future studies on this topic may help explain the well-documented psychological benefits of meditation and focused breathing, says Zelano, which can essentially synchronize brain oscillations across the brain’s emotion center.

The findings may also offer a clue as to why our breathing tends to speed up when we’re scared or panicked. “As a result, you’ll spend proportionally more time inhaling than when in a calm state,” Zelano says. This could affect brain function, she adds, “and result in faster response times to dangerous stimuli in the environment.”

In fact, Zelano thinks we may even be able to use this knowledge to our advantage. “If you’re in a dangerous environment with fearful stimuli, our data indicate that you can respond more quickly if you are inhaling through your nose,” she says.

Related: 9 Foods That May Help Save Your Memory

Of course, this study is just a first step. Whether we can truly use our breath to enhance or control our fear response—or our memory, for that matter—remains to be seen, says Zelano.

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A Helpful (and Realistic) Way to Manage Your Post-Election Emotions

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The election is finally over. But it’s safe to say that, as a nation, the tensions and anxieties related to this historic race—and its outcome—aren’t going away anytime soon. While about half of the country is celebrating Donald Trump’s victory today, many others are facing feelings of disappointment.

If you’re in the latter group, you may be looking for ways to cope. Should you avoid the news, or wallow in it? Will you feel better by sharing your thoughts on social media, or worse?

Yes, it's a cliché but you can start by taking a deep breath—literally—says Diana Winston, director of mindfulness education at UCLA’s Mindful Awareness Research Center. It won’t change the outcome of the race but that simple act has been scientifically proven to help curb anxiety and refocus your attention. That’s important, says Winston, because dwelling on negative emotions will only push you deeper into sadness and despair.

And since stress is an inevitable part of life no matter what your political persuasion, Winston says mindfulness is a skill everyone can benefit from learning. Here's a cheat sheet to help you feel calmer in no time.

1. Focus on your breath. Mindfulness is about living in the present moment with openness, curiosity, and willingness, says Winston. That concept may be hard to grasp right now, but you can start small—by bringing your attention to your breath for a few minutes, and tuning out everything else around you.

Try to practice mindful breathing for a minimum of five minutes a day, says Winston. (To get started, listen to a guided tutorial on UCLA’s website.) “Once you get used to it, you can do it anytime in the day you need it,” she adds—like when a political conversation gets heated, or you feel yourself getting overwhelmed by the news.

2. Tune into your whole body. If you end up in a heated conversation, notice what’s going on with your body in that moment: Feel your feet on the floor, your heart racing, and the heat rising in your cheeks, for example.

Acknowledge those feelings, but don’t let them take over. “If you notice there’s anxiety or anger there, then you can bring consciousness to it and not necessarily be so reactive when you choose to respond,” Winston says.

Pinpointing your emotion may even have a soothing effect in itself, she adds. “Research shows that when we are aware of feeling and we label it correctly, it calms down the primitive part of the brain, and activates the part that helps with impulse control instead.”

3. Maintain perspective. It’s easy to get caught up in thoughts about worst-case scenarios. But remind yourself that that’s exactly what they are—and that dwelling on them won’t change things or help you feel better.

“Mindfulness teaches us that we shouldn’t believe everything we think,” says Winston. “When a thought comes into your head—‘I have to leave the country,’ or ‘I’ll never talk to my relatives again’—you don’t have to follow that train of thought.” Instead, take a deep breath (see No. 1), bring yourself back to the present, and do your best to take things one step at a time.

4. Be proactive, not reactive. Practicing mindfulness doesn’t mean you should just sit back and give up on your beliefs and your passions. But it does mean you should think before making rash decisions while emotions are running high.

“Mindfulness can help you act for change, but from a place of wisdom and compassion rather than a place of reactivity—two very different ways of acting that can have completely different results,” says Winston. “When you practice it over time, you cultivate a quality of even-mindedness and balance, even amidst the ups and downs of life.”

5. Acknowledge your judgments. Mindfulness can be especially valuable when talking with others who have different opinions. (You may not feel up to doing that at all today, says Winston, and that’s okay. But doing so at some point, with mutual respect, will be an important step toward bridging the divides in our country.)

It’s only human—and totally normal—to form opinions about why a person feels the way they do. But you can acknowledge those judgments, in your head, without letting them go any farther. Remember, you don’t have to believe everything you think.

“Everyone wants the same thing deep down—to be safe, happy, and healthy,” she says. “So instead of writing someone off before really hearing them out, see if you can listen to these deeper needs and come to an understanding.”

6. Practice gratitude. “There is some neuroscience around the idea that people can’t have both fear and gratitude in their minds at the same time,” says Winston, “so doing some kind of gratitude practice right now can definitely be helpful.”

Call a loved one and tell them how much you appreciate them. Spend a few minutes writing down things you’re thankful for. Or just take the opportunity to bring awareness to the time you spend with your favorite people, places, or activities.

These strategies certainly won’t solve all of the country's challenges, nor will they erase your anger or anxieties. But that’s not the point of mindfulness—and that’s what makes it realistic.

“It’s not about trying to get rid of these feelings,” says Winston. “It’s about giving yourself tools so you can tolerate them and be at peace with them, so you can then move onward and upward.”

 

This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

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11 feelgood and inspiring fitspo mantras

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Is fitspo preoccupied with the appearance of health rather than health itself? We put these fitspos through their paces and boy, were we inspired. 

 

Girls Gone Strong

girlsgonestrong.com

“Hot body secret.”

It’s the holy grail of fitness – work hard enough to lose fat without getting bulky. GGS bloggers Neghar Fonooni, Molly Galbraith, and Alli McKee have distilled the science into a lean-out formula and paired it with precision workouts. They also jot the latest science news and have a free recipe book to download. 

 

Neghar Fonooni

negharfonooni.com

“You’ll want to work out.”

For fitness expert Neghar Fonooni, fitness equals happiness. Framed within principles of motivation, infused with her infectious energy, her counsel makes even hardcore kettlebell workouts sound doable (and fun). 

 

Mobility WOD

mobilitywod.com

“Find balance in going hard.”

Don’t know when to return to gym after an injury or trying to find the tricky balance between working out often enough and overtraining? Doctor of physical therapy and CrossFit coach Kelly Starrett has built his vlog around movement and mobility, spanning topics including managing pain and fast-tracking injury recovery to using exercise science to improve athleticism. 

 

Nia Shanks

niashanks.com

“Fit mind, fit body.”

Shanks embraces the relationship between mind and body, addressing psychological and physiological factors with humour and compassion. Her candid exploration of anxiety and motivation and the non-physical perks of working out are a refreshing antagonist to tyrannical body ideals and training manifestos. 

 

Mile Posts

mile-posts.com

“Love your run.”

Marathoner and mother Dorothy Beal proffers the practical lessons she’s learned during her journey from overweight to super fit. Her inspiring blog spans playlists tailored to motivation and BPM, running technique tips and even hints for hot-footing it with a stroller. 

 

Ask Lauren Fleshman

asklaurenfleshman.com

“Couch to half marathon.”

If you reckon you’re not a runner, Lauren Fleshman begs to differ. As well as penning the blog equivalent of a running encyclopaedia, sorted into categories such as technique, training, recovery, racing and nutrition, Fleshman personally answers reader questions, which are archived for your reference. 

 

Run to the Finish

runtothefinish.com

“Quirky, compassionate running.”

If the pressure to achieve an outcome cripples your buzz, take a step back with quirky running blogger Amanda Brooks, whose disdain for perfection gives this running blog an edge. The paradox is that by focusing on the process (you’ll be amazed by how quickly you forget about PBs), you’ll probably be pleasantly surprised by background performance gains. Brooks also canvasses strategies for overcoming sugar cravings and simplifying clean eating. Her relatable personal anecdotes are a pleasure to read too. 

 

Precision Nutrition

precisionnutrition.com

“Fitness myth buster.”

If you like slavishly following fitness tropes and trends, look away. This no-bulltish blog takes an unforgiving look at the fitness industry and scrutinises the merit of trends and ideologies. We love that the sharp wit is backed by solid science. Whether you want to get to the bottom of whether skipping brekkie will make you fat or what to eat before cardio, this is your reality check. 

 

Purely Twins

purelytwins.com

“All about balance.”

Gorgeous twin sisters Lori and Michelle have carved a niche with their fine balance of fitness, wellness and healthy living. With topics including workouts, food and wellbeing, every visit to the site offers fresh inspiration depending on where you’re at and what you’re looking for. 

 

LiVe Life Active

livelifeactive.com

“Reality check trainer.”

PT and fitness model Erin Weiss is a refreshing voice in an often-obsessive industry, calling out unhealthy extremes and the consequences of pressure to maintain an unrealistic body. Delightfully infusing serious topics and fitness training tips with lighter notes such as fashion loves, this resists being preachy while keeping it real. 

 

Comeback Momma

comebackmomma.com

“Big picture body bible.”

Firm legs? Taut abs? Whatever your fitness goal, fitness coach Jenn Mitchell has thought of it first and written a program to suit. Her blog, which she started after struggling with depression and weight gain, is sorted into specific goals. Her down-to-earth wisdom and a big-picture perspective to topics spanning family, food, fitness and fashion are genuinely inspiring.

Looking more motivational stories? Check out our September cover model story with Alexa Towersey. 

 

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Millennials Are Just as Hard-Working as Baby Boomers, Study Finds

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FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Boomers brace yourselves: You don’t have a stronger work ethic than those in later generations, a new study finds.

Baby boomers are said to place work at the center of their lives, to avoid loafing and to be ethical in their dealings with others. Their work ethic is also associated with greater job satisfaction and performance, and greater commitment, according to the researchers.

But an analysis of 77 studies turned up no significant difference in work ethic between boomers (born between 1946 and 1964), Generation X (1965 to 1980), and millennials (1981 to 1999).

The investigators looked at 105 different measures, including hours worked and commitment to family and work.

The results, published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of Business and Psychology, support those of previous studies, the authors behind the new study said.

“The finding that generational differences in the [so-called] Protestant work ethic do not exist suggests that organizational initiatives aimed at changing talent management strategies and targeting them for the ‘very different’ millennial generation may be unwarranted,” said study leader Keith Zabel of Wayne State University in Detroit.

“Human resource-related organizational interventions aimed at building 21st century skills should therefore not be concerned with generational differences in Protestant work ethic as part of the intervention,” he added in a journal news release.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has stress-reducing tips for working parents.

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A New Cancer Immunotherapy Leads to Remissions

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In a small new study published inScience Translational Medicine, researchers who are pioneering an immune-based treatment for cancer report encouraging results among people with otherwise untreatable non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a blood cancer.

Led by Dr. Cameron Turtle from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the scientists gave a group of 32 people different chemotherapy regimens and then introduced immune cells specifically designed to target and destroy cancer cells. All of the patients had been given at least one traditional treatment, including some who had had stem cell transplants, but none had good responses to these approaches. After the immunotherapy, however, seven people in one treatment group went into complete remission, while another four saw their disease progress more slowly.

The treatment, called CAR-T cell therapy, is targeted toward blood cancers, where doctors can eliminate cancer cells and replace them with healthy blood and immune cells. The strategy hinges on two important steps. First, doctors need to remove as much of a patient’s cancer-ridden blood cells as possible — they do that with chemotherapy — in order to make room for a new population of healthy blood and immune cells. If too many of the cancer cells remain, then they could outcompete the new cells and simply destroy them. To ensure that doesn’t happen, Turtle and his team tested a two-drug chemotherapy regimen and compared it to a single drug chemo strategy. Those getting the combination showed the best results, amounting to a 64% complete remission rate; by comparison, only one of the people getting the single chemotherapy agent went into complete remission (an 8% rate).

Next, the researchers need to re-introduce the right amount of the right immune cells that can fight cancer. Known as T cells, these contain specific receptors that allow some of them to recognize and bind to cancer cells and others to destroy them. To enhance the potency of the therapy, the scientists coaxed these cells to grow in the lab and genetically engineered them to express the tumor-specific receptor. The idea is to then reintroduce these cells back into patients and give them new, healthy blood cells that are cancer-free.

The results mirror those that the same researchers found among patients with other types of blood cell, or B-cell cancers, but are particularly encouraging since previous immunotherapy strategies haven’t been as robust when applied to non Hodgkin lymphoma. The trial provides additional support for the idea that immune cells can be properly trained to recognize and destroy cancer — in this case, with the help of genetically manipulated T cells. The results show that doctors can indeed tip the scales in favor of having the body fight cancer in much the same way it tackles pathogens like bacteria and viruses.

The results also provide much-needed information on how to optimize the strategy for different types of cancer. These findings suggest, for example, that for harder to treat non Hodgkin lymphoma, a combination chemotherapy to eliminate as much of the existing cancer as possible, before the immune cells are re-introduced, might be the key to helping more patients with the condition to slow the progression of their disease or even achieve remission.

While effective, the therapy also comes with a down side. Because the T cells are agents of destruction, they can trigger adverse effects such as fever and inflammation as they tackle the cancerous cells. Twenty of the 32 people in the trial developed signs of inflammation and low blood pressure, with four people getting severe enough symptoms that they required time in the intensive care unit and treatment with steroids. Two people also developed toxic effects from the treatment that resulted in tremor or language problems, but these were reversible. Two people given the highest dose of the T cell therapy died; one of bleeding and another from bleeding due to an intestinal mass.

The scientists are hopeful. however, that more studies will help them figure out the right chemotherapy regimen and the right dose of T cells to achieve the best results with the least adverse effects. “We’re very encouraged by these responses,” says Dr. Stanley Riddell, one of the co-authors from Fred Hutchinson. “These patients all failed conventional therapies; we were treating patients who didn’t have very many options for treatments. Obviously it’s still early days, and we need longer follow up and need to understand more about when in the patient’s disease course is the best time to use this kind of therapy, but we certainly think it’s encouraging.”

 

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

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5 Sleep Problems Nobody Talks About

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You drift off at night like a newborn baby yet can't recall the last time you woke up truly refreshed. It may not seem that weird: "People tend to assume that because our modern lives are so hectic, nobody feels rested," says Meir Kryger, MD, a professor at the Yale School of Medicine. But the reality is, you might have a sleep disorder and not even know it. There are a handful of problems that can cheat you out of quality slumber, leaving you more tired in the morning than you were when you went to bed. Find out what could be going on between your sheets and how to catch more restorative z's, starting tonight.

Sleep Problem No. 1: You snore like a saw
Those snuffle-snorts mean that your slack tongue and throat muscles are narrowing your airway, possibly due to the shape of your soft palate or any extra weight you're carrying.

Although you're likely to wake up if you get short of breath, it may not be for long enough to remember. Some people wake dozens or even hundreds of times a night—a disorder known as sleep apnea that increases the risk of heart disease, stroke and possibly osteoporosis, according to a new study in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. "Those repeated awakenings are as disruptive as someone pinching you every two minutes all night long," says Safwan Badr, MD, chief of the division of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine at Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit.

Sleep aid: If you rarely wake up feeling bright-eyed, see a specialist to get checked for sleep apnea.(Three to 9 percent of women between the ages of 30 and 70 suffer from it.) If you have the condition, a CPAP machine and mask can help by keeping your pharynx open with a steady stream of air.

To quiet your snore, avoid rolling onto your back—a position that makes your airway more likely to collapse. Rachel Salas, MD, associate professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, suggests this little trick: Sew a tennis ball into the pocket of a sweatshirt and wear it backward to bed.

RELATED: 14 Reasons You're Always Tired

Sleep Problem No. 2: You grind your teeth
Do you wake up with a sore jaw or get chronic headaches? If so, you may be gnashing your ivories overnight. All that clenching can cause enough pain to interfere with your shut-eye (not to mention wear down your enamel). Experts believe that teeth grinding, which about 16 percent of us do, is associated with anxiety—though an abnormal bite and antidepressants can also play a role.

Sleep aid: A dentist will fit you with a mouth guard. If you're clamping down because you're overwhelmed and overloaded, find a healthier way to manage stress, urges Michael A. Grandner, PhD, an instructor in psychiatry at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. "It's also crucial to spend plenty of time winding down before bed so you drift off in a calm, relaxed state," he adds.

RELATED: 11 Signs You're Sleep Deprived

 

 

Next Page: Sleep Problem No. 3: Your body clock is off

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Sleep Problem No. 3: Your body clock is off
Not even drowsy until the wee hours? Delayed sleep-phase syndrome (DSPS) is the technical term for this disorder, which afflicts 10 percent of people who seek help for insomnia. It involves a biological glitch that prevents your body from making melatonin (the sleep hormone) until 12 a.m. or later. A prime sign you've got DSPS: You've been a night owl since high school. The syndrome is common among teenagers and sometimes persists into adulthood. If you're not squeezing in at least seven hours of z's a night, you're at greater risk of high blood pressure and diabetes. What's more, a recent study published in Cognitive Therapy and Research found that people who nod off late (and get less sleep as a result) tend to experience more negative thoughts.

Sleep aid: Begin by improving your sleep hygiene. Cut back on caffeine. Avoid tech and television starting 90 minutes before bedtime. Create a soothing wind-down routine. And get some sun first thing in the morning to help reset your body's 24-hour rhythm. "In 80 percent of cases, these strategies lead people to conk out earlier," Dr. Badr says. If they don't do the trick, a specialist may prescribe synthetic melatonin, as well as light therapy with a medical lamp to use in the morning.

RELATED: 20 Things You Shouldn't Do Before Bed

Sleep Problem No. 4: Your legs feel jittery at night
That creepy-crawly feeling—aptly called Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)—troubles as many as 1 in 10 people and is thought to be linked to a dysfunction in the way the brain processes the neurotransmitter dopamine. However, in some cases it suggests a nutritional deficiency, Dr. Kryger notes: "With people who have low iron, there seems to be overactivity in parts of the brain that results in an urge to move the legs."

Sleep aid: Ice packs, warm packs, massages, a bath—any of these remedies might help, says David N. Neubauer, MD, associate professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: "Different things seem to work for different people."

Also, talk to a sleep doc about trying an RLS drug. Be sure to mention your current prescriptions because some meds (including certain antidepressants) reduce dopamine activity. Get your iron levels checked, too, Dr. Gardner advises: "Sometimes a supplement is the only treatment necessary."
 

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Sleep Problem No. 5: You sleepwalk—and even sleep eat
For reasons that aren't completely understood, somnambulists are partially aroused in the night—often from the deepest stage of slumber (called slow-wave)—and proceed to wander around the house. The behavior, which may affect up to 4 percent of the population, appears to run in families and is more likely to occur with sleep deprivation. Another trigger: taking zolpidem (one of the most popular sedatives), according to Robert S. Rosenberg, DO, author of Sleep Soundly Every Night; Feel Fantastic Every Day.

Additionally, 1 to 3 percent of people who experience such a zombie-like state actually raid the kitchen. Called sleep-related eating disorder, this condition often strikes women on a diet, who go to bed hungry.

Sleep aid: Benzodiazepines (aka tranquilizers) can sometimes help, and so does getting more sleep. As long as your nocturnal adventures don't involve anything risky (like, for example, baking cookies), you may not need medication, Rosenberg says: "Just make sure you safety-proof your home by clearing out clutter and stowing away sharp objects." If you're a nighttime roamer, let your partner know that the ideal approach is to gently lead you back to bed.

RELATED: Best and Worst Foods for Sleep

 

 

 

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