The Ketogenic Diet: An Ultimate Guide. This infographic shows some of the benefi…

The Ketogenic Diet: An Ultimate Guide. This infographic shows some of the benefits of a Ketogenic Diet alongside a meal plan for 7 days featuring breakfasts, lunches, and dinners. You can find all of this info and a lot more on keto and low carb living in the main article at nutritionadvance…. Source by sabrinashealthynutritionguide

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Fat Loss 

Research Shows That Neck Pain is More Common in Women

Neck pain is a lot more prevalent in women compared to men, regardless of occupation or age. Stressed younger women suffer from more neck pain in comparison to their male counterparts. Women also perceive everyday life to be more stressful. Source by dralexjimenez

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Fat Loss 

From Pot Belly to Ripped Abs in 7 Weeks: This Father of 5 Shows You How It’s Done | Hiit Blog

Adapted from The Daily Mail. Julius Kieser, a 34 year old former personal trainer and fitness writer from Australia who understands how hard fitness can Source by cativirlan

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Fat Loss 

When paired with diet and exercise, YOUTH™ 7-Keto DHEA supplement has been…

When paired with diet and exercise, YOUTH™ 7-Keto DHEA supplement has been shown to accelerate fat loss 300% without any negative stimulant effects on the body. Unlike first generation DHEA which converts into androgens and estrogens, 7-Keto DHEA shows no conversion to male or female sex hormones. This new process makes it a safe alternative, and allows you to safely reap the benefits, such as: •Increased metabolism •Anti-aging effects •Increased energy and stamina •Strengthened immune system Source by formutech

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Fat Loss 

Image that shows what the male and female bodies look like depending on body fat…

Image that shows what the male and female bodies look like depending on body fat percentage 2014-02-19-bodyfatpercentagepicturemenwomen.jpg #weightlossmotivation Source by wimbishh

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Here's How Much You Need to Exercise If You Sit at a Desk All Day, According to Science

http://www.popsugar.com/fitness/Exercise-Formula-Counteract-Sitting-42113170

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

The perils of sitting all day aren’t good. Researchers have shown that remaining stationary for extended periods of time (like at your 9-to-5 desk job) can be detrimental to your health. While exercise is a big part of offsetting the harmful effects of sitting, it was unclear how many gym sessions were needed to help — until now.

A new study, published in The Lancet, shows the ideal formula for counteracting the negative effects of a sedentary job. Instead of a fixed number of hours spent exercising, the ratio depends on how much you sit: people who work a typical eight-hour day should spend at least one hour each day moving; if you sit six hours a day, you should spend half an hour exercising. The research also indicated that the exercise doesn’t have to be all at once — or rigorous. It can be spread throughout the day and be as simple as walking.

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The team behind the study analyzed data from a pool of a million adults over the age of 45 in Western Europe, the United States, and Australia. Using previous data, the researchers examined data from 16 published studies and used it to determine how much exercise is required to compensate for sitting. Their recommended daily exercise goal is higher than previous advice but not necessarily less attainable, given it can be completed throughout the day.

Fitting in an hour of exercise a day sounds especially daunting if you have a desk job, but there are plenty of workouts you can complete before and after work. Even if it means taking a 10-minute walk during lunch, your body will thank you in the long run.

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Fitbit vs. Apple Watch For Exercise: Here Are Our Thoughts

http://www.popsugar.com/fitness/Apple-Watch-Fitbit-Charge-2-Workouts-42841710

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

Fitness trackers are one of the hottest holiday gifts — and for good reason! They motivate, inspire, and can help incite massive physical (and mental) changes. Whether you’re trying to encourage more movement or help someone learn about their heart rate during exercise, a tracker can help.

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I got the chance to compare my Apple Watch Series 2 and my Fitbit Charge 2 side by side, worn simultaneously (yes, I looked like a tool in my SoulCycle classes and on my runs and in my kettlebell class). Since trackers have been helping me on my fitness journey, I wanted to see what the user experience was like for each and what kind of data I could access after my workout. Let’s take a look.

Aesthetic

If you’re worried about the look of your tracker, you have two great options to choose from. You either lean more toward the aesthetic of a traditional tracker/fitness band with the Fitbit Charge 2, or the digital watch styling of the Apple Watch. With both, you can choose the metal accent color (gold, silver, etc.) and change out the bands if you’d like to wear them every day beyond your workouts. Fitbit has a blush pink leather that I’m particularly fond of, and I may switch up my Apple Watch with a new color of silicone band if I get tired of the light gray.

General Features (of Note)
HRM. Both trackers offer a heart rate monitor, which is ideal for data tracking and learning more about your body. It also provides a more accurate account of how many calories are burned per workout.

Waterproof (or not). The Apple Watch Series 2 is waterproof, the Fitbit Charge 2 is not. You will definitely have to take it off in your post-workout shower.

Music Storage. Additionally, the latest Apple Watch has music storage capabilities, meaning you don’t have to bring your phone, and you can listen to your workout playlist — provided you have Bluetooth headphones.

Tracking Your Workout

The first time I used my Fitbit Charge 2, I had no idea how to start tracking my workouts — I was simply wearing it for step tracking and my heart rate. But when I wore it to SoulCycle, it somehow miraculously knew that I was doing a cycling workout from the moment I started — from there, it logged my heart rate every second of the way, and provided me with an in-depth analysis of my workout. Once the Fitbit synced with my phone, the app showed a workout logged as “Bike.”

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I wrongfully assumed my Apple Watch Series 2 would do the same, and went into another SoulCycle class with it, only to be disappointed not only at its lack of intuitive tracking, but zero data to be found anywhere. It didn’t log my heart rate more than once or twice throughout the 45-50 minutes of the workout, and I had no data to track, no exercise counted toward my day. I get it — first world problems. But as someone who loves tracking all of my exercise and activity, this was sorely disappointing.

If there’s enough movement, the Apple Watch will sense it. I went to a hip-hop workout class, and though the Watch knew I was exercising (it logged minutes toward my daily exercise goal), it did not log any particular exercise nor give me the option to.

With the Fitbit, you can retroactively track your workout. Because the tracker is more closely monitoring your heart rate, you can enter the data and say, “I worked out from 12:00 p.m. to 12:45,” and it will populate your workout with the data from that time. This is not an option on the Apple Watch Series 2, as far as I can tell.

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Both trackers give you the option to log a workout if you hit a button and “start” your run, cycling class, general cardio, or weight lifting (Fitbit has a weight-specific workout you can select, Apple Watch you’ll have to select “other”). However, neither tracker gives you the option to edit your stop time of your workout — so if you forget to hit the “stop” button and hours have passed, you’re stuck with wonky data and skewed average heart rate information (and a several-hour-long “workout” on your records).

Data and Accuracy

Each tracker displays the average heart rate, total calories burned, and the length of the workout — I wore both of mine at once (in the same type of class, three times, just to be sure) to see how close they were in terms of data accuracy, and I still have no idea which one was correct. Take a look — these are three cycling classes, about 50 minutes long (with the cooldown), both logged at the same time, with the same height/weight/age data in the system.

As you can see, they never lined up 100 percent. Although similar in average heart rate and caloric burn, it’s impossible to tell which one is accurate, which can be frustrating.

In terms of getting a better insight as to what’s happening in your workout, the Fitbit wins by a mile. The heart rate data is so much more nuanced, and it can even show you how many calories you burned in each minute of your workout. I love that it shows you how long your heart rate was in different zones, and the graphs really animate the physiology of your workout, so you get more of an inside look into what’s happening in your body. It’s great. Unfortunately, with the Apple Watch, you’re stuck with average numbers and no fun graphs.

Price

The Apple Watch Series 2 ranges from $369 to $399, and the Fitbit Charge 2 ranges from $150 to $180.

Overall Impression

If you’re looking for data, the Fitbit really does win by a long shot. The data it provides is so much more detailed, and the intuitive exercise tracking makes for much more hassle-free workouts. This is a specialty piece of equipment specifically created and designed for exercise — whereas the Apple Watch was designed with a lot of other things in mind. I do wish they’d provide a feature that lets you cut off your workout time if you actually forget to stop your tracking, though.

While the Apple Watch Series 2 provides a lot more of the bells and whistles (It’s waterproof! You can text on it! It stores your playlists!), in terms of tracking, it’s just not as smart as the Fitbit when it comes to fitness, data, and overall wellness. However, if you’re looking to use it as a running tracker, I’d highly recommend it in that case.

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