Fat Loss Weight Loss 

Ebook: Reverse and Cure Type 2 Diabetes

Product Name: Ebook: Reverse and Cure Type 2 Diabetes Click here to get Ebook: Reverse and Cure Type 2 Diabetes at discounted price while it’s still available… All orders are protected by SSL encryption – the highest industry standard for online security from trusted vendors. Ebook: Reverse and Cure Type 2 Diabetes is backed with a 60 Day No Questions Asked Money Back Guarantee. If within the first 60 days of receipt you are not satisfied with Wake Up Lean™, you can request a refund by sending an email to…

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Fat Loss Weight Loss 

(1) The Diabetes Solution – Reverse Diabetes

Product Name: (1) The Diabetes Solution – Reverse Diabetes Click here to get (1) The Diabetes Solution – Reverse Diabetes at discounted price while it’s still available… All orders are protected by SSL encryption – the highest industry standard for online security from trusted vendors. (1) The Diabetes Solution – Reverse Diabetes is backed with a 60 Day No Questions Asked Money Back Guarantee. If within the first 60 days of receipt you are not satisfied with Wake Up Lean™, you can request a refund by sending an email to…

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Fat Loss Weight Loss 

How To Improve Kidney Function | Natural Treatments to Reverse Kidney Disease Problems By Diet

Product Name: How To Improve Kidney Function | Natural Treatments to Reverse Kidney Disease Problems By Diet Click here to get How To Improve Kidney Function | Natural Treatments to Reverse Kidney Disease Problems By Diet at discounted price while it’s still available… All orders are protected by SSL encryption – the highest industry standard for online security from trusted vendors. How To Improve Kidney Function | Natural Treatments to Reverse Kidney Disease Problems By Diet is backed with a 60 Day No Questions Asked Money Back Guarantee. If within…

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People Who Suffer From Hair Loss Can Eat These 9 Foods To Reverse The Process…

People Who Suffer From Hair Loss Can Eat These 9 Foods To Reverse The Process Source by nmorrow81384

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Dynamic warm up routine

www.judgeweightloss.com/sixpackabs

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

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Warm up your muscles with September cover model Alexa Towersey’s favourite warm up sequence.

 

Alexa always incorporates a structured dynamic warm-up before every training session. It’s the perfect opportunity to prime the nervous system and prepare the muscles, reinforce correct movement patterns and identify and address any structural imbalances or weaknesses. Learning how to switch ‘off’ the wrong muscles, and switch on the ‘right’ muscles, for the workout to come is the key to making your workouts more efficient and effective.

HOT TIP

 

If your hip flexors are tight, they can inhibit the glutes from firing, so you need to include a dynamic warm-up that focuses on opening up the hips first and then isolating and activating the glutes.

Overhead Reverse Lunge x 10

Alexa-Overhead-Reverse-Lunge1.jpg

Alexa-Overhead-Reverse-Lunge2.jpg

 

Step back into a reverse lunge, bringing the knee down to graze the ground as you reach your arms up and out of your hips towards the ceiling. Emphasise driving the pelvis underneath you to create length along the front of the hip. Alternate legs.

Photographer: James Seneviratne (@jamesjoel)

Dressed in: P.E. Nation

Shot at: F45 Bondi

 

 

 

 

 

Band-resisted lateral monster walk x 20 each way

Alexa-Band-Lateral-Walk-`.jpg

 

 

Place the band under your mid foot, cross it over and bring it up around the front of your shoulders. Feet are hip-distance apart with hip, knee and second toe lined up. Without compensating with the upper body, exaggerate a step to the side – essentially stepping with one foot and resisting with the other. You can perform variations with feet facing forwards, turned out and turned in to make sure you hit the glutes from all angles.

Photographer: James Seneviratne (@jamesjoel)

Dressed in: P.E. Nation

Shot at: F45 Bondi

 

 

 

 

Single-leg glute bridge x 15 each leg

Alexa-Single-Leg-Glute-Bridge-1.jpg

Alexa-Single-Leg-Glute-Bridge-2.jpg

Set your heels up in line with your sit bones, having the hip, knee, second toe in alignment – you should be able to touch your heels with your fingertips. Pull one knee into the chest, drawing the thigh towards the ribs. Hold it tight as you drive the hips up towards the ceiling, pushing the heel of your foot through the ground. The knee drawn in helps to disengage the lower back, allowing you to isolate the glutes.

Photographer: James Seneviratne (@jamesjoel)

Dressed in: P.E. Nation

Shot at: F45 Bondi

 

 

Check out Alexa’s top three training tips here.

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Also check out healthywithjodi.com

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Booty-building with trainer Tahlia Seinor

www.judgeweightloss.com

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

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Activate your glutes with this booty-building workout by Tahlia Seinor. 

buildbodyparts1a

Given the glutes’ lack of use during our day-to-day life, Seinor suggests working them every time you are in the gym – either in isolation or as part of your leg training or full body workout of that day.

“My girls are also instructed to complete sets of glute bridges every night before bed,” says Seinor. “If you don’t use it, you lose it. But also be sure to listen to your body and never overdo it.”

Seinor suggests varying your training to ensure all areas of the glute muscle are hit during exercise.

“There is no ideal training protocol for glute development, as they contain both fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibres. Developing both types requires a variety of training intensities, including low reps and heavier weights, and high repetitions with lighter weights,” says Seinor. “The glutes are a major muscle group in the body, so don’t be afraid to set the weight high.”

And on the ‘ass-to-grass’ debate, Seinor says to keep squatting low.

“Partial-range training has its benefits, but when it comes to gluteal development, you should perform exercises throughout a full range of motion,” she says.

“If exercises such as back squats, deadlifts, split squats and step-ups are executed with limited range, it could create structural imbalances that can adversely affect posture and athletic performance.”

 

Her sessions are all individual but her methods strongly follow that of Charles Poliquin. Feel free to add this to your training regime either as a whole program or worked in with your other exercises.

Rotate Day 1 and 2 throughout the week so you are completing it five to six times.

 

Tempo guideline:

keytempo

DAY 1

A) Wide Stance Squats

5 sets of 6 to 10 reps with a tempo of 4010. 3-minute rest between sets.

B) Reverse Hypers

3 sets of 10 to 12 reps with a tempo of 20X0. 2-minute rest between sets.

C) 45-degree back extension 

2 sets of 20 to 25 reps with a tempo of 10X0. 1-minute rest between sets.

 

 

DAY 2

A) Paused rack pulls in rack

5 sets of 6 to 8 reps with a tempo of 22X0. 3-minute rest between sets.

B) Drop lunges with weight

3 sets of 8 to 10 reps with a tempo of 2010. 2-minute rest between sets.

C) Romanian Deadlifts 

3 sets of 12 to 15 reps, tempo 3010. 1-minute rest between sets

 

Tip: ‘X’ refers to exploding from the bottom of the movement to the top of the movement, as quickly as possible.

 

NEXT: Want more booty building exercises? Add the yogi squat into your workouts today!

 

 

 

 

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Unhappy at Work in Your 20s? You May Be Unhealthy in Your 40s

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MONDAY, Aug. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Millennials, take heed: Job dissatisfaction in your 20s or 30s can undermine your health by mid-life, new research suggests.

But really rewarding work may pay health dividends.

“Those who are, on average, very satisfied versus satisfied tend to have better health in their 40s,” said study lead author Jonathan Dirlam. He is a doctoral candidate in the department of sociology at Ohio State University.

By their 40s, disenchanted workers had worse mental health. They were more likely to suffer from routine sleep trouble and anxiety compared with satisfied or increasingly satisfied participants, the study found.

Seth Kaplan, an associate professor in industrial/organizational psychology at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., said, “We know that there are some major job-related factors that contribute to poor psychological health.”

According to Kaplan, who wasn’t involved in the study, “Having an abusive supervisor, not having control over one’s work, and having to worry about losing one’s job—and the corresponding financial repercussions—are among the big ones.”

Kaplan added, “If at all possible, try to avoid jobs with those characteristics.”

For the study, Dirlam’s team analyzed survey responses from more than 6,400 men and women participating in a long-running study that began in 1979. Between the ages of 25 and 39, these adults were asked annually whether they liked or disliked their jobs.

Answers were correlated with mental and physical health outcomes when participants entered their 40s.

Roughly 45 percent consistently expressed “low” job satisfaction. On average, Dirlam said, this reflected relative dissatisfaction, rather than outright dislike for their work.

By contrast, 15 percent of respondents consistently noted they were “happy” with their jobs.

In addition, nearly one-quarter indicated that their satisfaction with work got worse over time, while 17 percent said they became more satisfied, the findings showed.

Once the participants reached their 40s, mental health status was gauged in terms of depression, sleep trouble and anxiety.

Overall physical health was also ranked, along with incidence of high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, arthritis, heart disease, chronic lung disease, back and leg trouble, stomach and liver complications, and anemia.

The researchers found that physical health appeared to suffer among those who consistently expressed low satisfaction with work or whose satisfaction fell over time.

These people reported more difficulty with certain issues, such as back pain and cold frequency. However, the researchers saw no impact on their overall ability to function physically, or in their risk for serious illnesses such as diabetes or cancer.

Nor was consistently low job satisfaction or falling satisfaction linked with a greater likelihood for developing depression.

However, these dissatisfied workers were more likely to be in poorer mental health overall, the findings showed.

The research team theorized that mental health difficulties could actually trigger more physical health complications as participants’ age.

But no negative impact on physical or mental well-being was seen among those who reported greater satisfaction with work over time, the study authors said.

Still, the investigators did not examine health status after age 49. They also acknowledged that the relationship is complex and said it’s not possible to establish cause and effect.

For example, “[early] health problems may lead to lower levels of job satisfaction rather than the reverse,” the authors said.

Dirlan noted that “those in manual labor jobs may have lower job satisfaction and increased physical health problems as a result of their jobs in later life. We are unable to rule out this possibility.”

For those desiring more satisfaction from their work, Kaplan highlighted the concept of “job crafting.” This embraces the notion “that we can, to some extent, objectively and subjectively change our jobs to make them more meaningful.”

Dirlam and his colleagues were scheduled to present their findings Monday in Seattle at a meeting of the American Sociological Association. Data and conclusions presented at meetings are usually considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

More information

The American Psychological Association has more about job satisfaction.

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5 equipment free exercises to tone your upper body

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If you don’t have access to a gym, there are many ways you can get your daily workout in. Start off with our list of ** upper body exercises. 

week1strength3.jpg

 

Clap push up

 

Choose your appropriate option for the clap push-up depending on your fitness and strength ability. These can be done on either your toes, knees or eliminate the clap altogether and just keep it a simple push-up. 

Start in a plank position and use your arms to lower your chest towards to floor – a nice deep push-up will get great results. Push your chest back up as you would with a normal push-up but with more force, springing off the ground for a clap. Land with soft elbows to prevent injury and do your next rep.

 

 

 

 

full-body-toning-circuit-chair-dipl.jpg

 

Chair dip

Face away from the chair.

Place your hands behind you on the edge of the seat, shoulder-width apart. With your hands securely in place, step a foot or two away, and straighten your legs and keep heels in contact with the floor. Straighten your arms so that your body is lifted. This is your starting position.

Bend your elbows and lower yourself until your elbows are 90 degrees, hold, and re-straighten back to the starting position. Repeat.

 

 

plank-to-palms.jpg

Plank to palms 

Not only works your abs but targets your shoulders and triceps.

 

Get into a prone position on the floor, supporting your weight on your toes and your forearms. Your arms are bent and directly below the shoulder.

Leading with one arm, push upwards while keeping your core on tight and have your other arm follow the lead.

Reverse the action with the leading arm to take you back to the starting plank position.

Repeat 5 reps with one leading arm before swapping to the opposite arm to lead.

Keep your body straight at all times.

Repeat this exercise for 5 reps (each side) and 3 sets. 

 

 

 

 

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Arm cincher & butt lifter

Not only tones arms but tones your butt and tightens your core

Begin in a high plank position, drawing a straight line from your shoulders to your knees. Lift your left leg up as you lower your right knee to the ground. Next, perform a tricep push-up by kissing your elbows to your waistline.

Complete 10 reps as you keep your left leg up and lifted. Repeat on the other side.

Words: Katrina Hodgson and Karena Dawn

Photography: Ashley Streff.

brooke-stacey-arm-workout-triangle-push-up-1.jpg

Triangle push-up

Begin the move by positioning hands on the mat directly under chest with fingers spread and thumbs and forefingers touching, making a triangle shape. Straighten legs in a plank position (harder) or knees on ground (easier). Make sure the back is flat and abs are engaged as you bend the elbows, lowering until your chin or chest touches the mat. At the bottom of the movement your elbows will naturally flare out to the side. Press back up to starting position while keeping a rigid torso through entire movement.

Check out these 14 exercises for toned arms. 

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Full-body succession workout

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The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

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Designed to faciliate optimal body composition to burn maximum calories, this workout will help you build strength and tone. 

 

 

 

succession-training

The circuit training component targets muscular endurance and improves cardiovascular fitness by working the heart and lungs at a higher rate. It involves performing one set of each exercise with little or no rest in between until all the exercises have been completed.

 

“Traditional-style (succession) strength programs are when all sets of the first exercise are performed before progressing to the next exercise,” says trainer Nichelle Laus.

“By adding a succession routine to your current full-body circuit, it will help in maximising your strength and adding lean muscle mass.”

 

When choosing your dumbbell weight, err on the heavy side. “Succession programs generally use higher weights than circuit training,” Laus says. “This is key to building metabolically active lean tissue.”

 

What you’ll need:

» Workout bench

» 1 set of medium to heavy dumbbells

What you’ll do:

For Day 1 

Start with the Upper Body exercises. Perform one set of each exercise, then move on to the next exercise without rest. At the end of the Lower Body exercises, rest one minute, then repeat for a total of three circuits.

For toning, aim at 12 to 15 reps for each exercise.

For increasing strength and maximising muscular power, aim for 10 to 12 reps for each exercise.

For Day 2 

Start with the Lower Body exercises. Perform one set of each exercise, then move on to the next exercise without rest. At the end of the Upper Body exercises, rest one minute, then repeat for a total of three circuits.

For toning, aim at 12 to 15 reps for each exercise.

For increasing strength and maximising muscular power, aim for 10 to 12 reps for each exercise.

For Day 3 

Start with the Upper or Lower Body exercises. Complete three sets of the first exercise before moving on to the next. Repeat until all the exercises of the Upper and Lower Body exercises have been completed.

For toning, aim at 12 to 15 reps for each exercise, resting 60 seconds in between sets. For increasing strength and maximising muscular power, aim for 10 to 12 reps for each exercise, resting 90 seconds in between sets.

Exercises:

Upper Body

•Shoulder Press

•One-Arm Dumbbell Row

•Alternate Incline Dumbbell Bicep Curl

•Bench Dips

•Decline Push-ups

Lower Body

•Bench Hops

•Prone Glute Lifts

•Step-up with Knee Raise

Let’s get started!

Model: Chanel Sabovitch 

Words: Nichelle Laus

Photography: Dave Laus // davelaus.com

Shot on location at: Studio Two22

Hair and make-up: Two Chicks & Some Lipstick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shoulder presses (shoulder, triceps)

dumbellshoulder_succession.jpg

 

Hold a dumbbell in each hand and sit on a bench, with back support if possible.

Plant your feet firmly on the floor hip-width apart. Bend your elbows and raise your upper arms to shoulder height so the dumbbells are at ear level. Push the dumbbells up and in until the ends of the dumbbells touch lightly above your head. Lower back down to the starting position and repeat for amount of desired repetitions.

 

 

 

One-arm dumbbell row (middle back, biceps)

 

onearmdumbell-succession.jpg

 

Place a dumbbell on the left-hand side at one end of a flat bench.

Position yourself on the left side of a flat bench with your right knee and right hand resting on the bench.

Pick up the dumbbell with your left hand using a neutral grip. Slowly pull the dumbbell up as far as possible.

Pause and squeeze your shoulder blades together, and then slowly lower the dumbbell back to the starting position.

Repeat for amount of desired repetitions, and then repeat for your other side

 

 

 

 

Alternate incline dumbbell bicep curls (biceps)

 

alternateincline-succession.jpg

 

Grab a pair of dumbbells and sit down on an incline bench positioned at a 45-degree angle. Pull your shoulder blades back and let the dumbbells hang at your sides with your palms facing forward.

Curl one of the dumbbells up, bending the elbow and bringing the weight to your shoulder. Pause, then lower your arm back to starting position. Repeat for the amount of desired repetitions. Repeat with the other arm. 

 

 

 

 

Bench dips (triceps)

 

benchdips-succession.jpg

 

 

Position your hands shoulder-width apart on a secured bench. Move your feet out as far out in front of you as possible. Straighten out your arms and keep a little bend in your elbows in order to always keep tension on your triceps and off your elbow joints. Slowly lower your upper body down towards the floor and keep your elbows tucked into your sides. Once you reach the bottom of the movement, slowly press off with your hands and push yourself back up to the starting position with your triceps. Repeat for desired amount of repetitions.

 

 

 

Decline push ups (chest)

 

decline-pushups.jpg

 

Get in the standard push-up position with your feet elevated on a bench (or other surface) and hands slightly wider than shoulder width. Your elbows should be completely locked out. While keeping your body straight, lower your chest to the floor. Pause and push back to the starting position. Repeat for desired amount of repetitions.

 

 

Bench hops (quads, glutes, core)

 

benchhops-succession.jpg

 

Stand to one side of a flat bench with feet together. Holding the front of the bench, lean your weight into your hands and keep your feet together. Quickly jump up and over the bench. As soon as your feet touch the ground, jump back again. Continue jumping back and forth for desired amount of repetitions.

 

 

Step-ups with knee raise (glutes, hamstrings, quads)

 

stepups-succession.jpg

 

 

Stand facing a bench with your feet together. Step up, putting your left foot on the top of the bench. Extend through the hip and knee of your front leg to stand up on the bench. As you stand on the bench with your left leg, flex your right knee and hip, bringing your knee as high as you can. Reverse this motion to step down off the bench, and repeat the sequence on the opposite leg. Repeat for the desired amount of repetitions.

 

 

Prone glute lifts (glutes, hamstrings)

 

glute1-succession.jpg

glute2-succession.jpg

 

Lie face down on a flat bench, hands holding under the front of bench.

Lift both legs upward and extend them in a ‘V’ position, keeping feet about six inches (15 cm) from the bench, squeezing the glutes until your lower abdomen is slightly elevated from the bench. Lower down and repeat for desired amount of repetitions. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Workout tips for toned arms

 

If you’re looking to mix up your arm workouts, supersetting is key.

Try: Supersetting Antagonising

Supersetting antagonising is the pairing of two opposite muscle groups such as chest and back, triceps and biceps and quads and hamstrings. The science behind this technique is to loosen one muscle while its antagonist contracts. This allows more weight to be used, or additional reps performed.

How: Give this little workout a go:

a. Dumbbell external rotation 10 reps – 4 sets, tempo 3; 0; 2; rest 30 seconds
b. Incline dumbbell preacher curl 10–12reps – 4 sets, tempo 3; 0; 1
c. Tricep rope pushdowns 15 reps – 4 sets, tempo 2; 0; 2; rest 45 seconds
d. Scott curl reverse biceps curls 8–10 reps – 4 sets, tempo 2; 0; 2
e. Overhead dumbbell triceps extension 12–15 reps – 4 sets, tempo 2; 2; 1; rest 45 seconds

Why: Supersetting agonist and antagonist muscle groups is not only time efficient and great for building lean, toned arms, but it also increases the afterburn effect of your workout by up to 24 hours.

Insider’s tip: Try and finish off your arms day with 3 x 500m sprints on the rower to really get your arms burning.

Check out our workout section for fitness tips, exercises and workouts.

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