Fat Loss Weight Loss 

The Weight Loss Motivation Bible: How To Program Your Mind For Sustainable Fat Loss

Product Name: The Weight Loss Motivation Bible: How To Program Your Mind For Sustainable Fat Loss Click here to get The Weight Loss Motivation Bible: How To Program Your Mind For Sustainable Fat Loss at discounted price while it’s still available… All orders are protected by SSL encryption – the highest industry standard for online security from trusted vendors. The Weight Loss Motivation Bible: How To Program Your Mind For Sustainable Fat Loss is backed with a 60 Day No Questions Asked Money Back Guarantee. If within the first 60…

Read More
Workout Music 

Feel This Moment (feat. DJ DMX)

By Amanda Blue Download now from Itunes

Read More

Amanda's Secret to Losing Over 100 Pounds Wasn't a Diet

www.popsugar.com/fitness/130-Pound-Weight-Loss-Story-37209787

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

Our next Before & After story comes from Amanda Fraijo-Tobin, who blogs about life after losing 130 pounds on her blog Friday Love Song, which is part of our POPSUGAR Select Fitness network. Below, she shares how she lost the weight and how she keeps it off.

Amanda: Before

Growing up, I wasn’t severely overweight — sure, I had a pudgy stage, but a lot of people did! My weight wasn’t something I thought much about being a kid (as it shouldn’t be). My parents had good intentions, like most, but we certainly did not grow up eating very healthy. Snacks, soda, meals prepared without nutritional aspects considered. Soda became a very bad habit for me, especially as I got into my teens and didn’t have anyone stopping me from drinking so many.

Fast-forward to high school — like most high school girls, I thought I was fat. Even though, in retrospect, I clearly wasn’t. I didn’t let it consume my life, though I was a little on the chubby side (so I thought) and I was OK with that. Looking back, I think senior year is when the trouble began for me. Stress, changes in my life, poor eating, and not exercising (hello, gym-class-not-required-after-ninth-grade!) led me to pack on some weight. Again, I already felt like a “fat girl,” so I kept going with the mind-set of “This is me — this is who I am.” I was married young, had my first child at 20, and of course, packed on more weight. Divorced, remarried, and two more babies later — more weight.

42466972

My weight wasn’t something I paid attention to. I never weighed myself. The only time anyone took my weight was maybe once or twice a year when I had a doctor’s visit — and even then, I didn’t think much about it. This is me — this is who I am . . .

Amanda: Before

My husband is a type 2 diabetic. He had already been on tons of medications for several years to control his blood sugar and other problems associated with the disease. He got to the point of having to add insulin injections to his enormous list of meds. His doctor kept urging him to consider weight-loss surgery, telling him that, if he lost some weight, there was a possibility he may be able to stop taking some of his medications. This seemed like a great solution to my husband — I, on the other hand, disagreed. I told him repeatedly, this wasn’t the solution. If you don’t break bad habits that got you to a certain point, you could not possibly make a real change.

37137563

Insert light bulb moment. Pot calling kettle black. Even though it wasn’t something I monitored, I was surely at the heaviest point of my life. I was waking up to get my son to school and collapsing on the couch for a nap once he was off. I was having random pains in my foot. I felt gross. I knew I needed to start making changes. I needed to make changes for myself, but also for my husband, for my kids. I needed to be a better example. This wasn’t about vanity. This was about life, making a better life for myself and my family.

I knew this wasn’t going to be easy. I had packed on the weight over the course of 10 years. I knew it was going to take some time to take it back off. I knew there would be times I would feel like quitting. But from the start, I adopted a “Today I will do what I can” kind of attitude. This went for exercise as well as eating habits. I knew all my bad eating habits were not going to disappear overnight. Slowly but surely, I made mental lists of things I was doing that were awful for my body and thought of ways to change them. Drink more water, read labels of items I was eating, etc. I had been having such severe pains in my heel that some days I could not even walk on it. Some days, I may not get through an entire workout like I wanted to — that’s OK. Today I will do what I can.

Amanda: After

I chose not to be vocal about my weight-loss journey from the start. I didn’t mention it to friends. My husband and my father were about the only people who knew what I was trying to accomplish. There were many days of whining on my part to my husband about aches and pains from making my body do things it wasn’t used to doing. I admit I have no idea for sure what my starting weight was. I have a general idea based on the last time I had been weighed at the doctors — but my journey began about six months, and what I’m guessing, may even be more pounds later. I did not start out with a goal weight in mind. I didn’t want one. I wanted to be healthier. Period. Healthy is not pounds on a scale. This is not a short fix; this is a change I will continue to make for the rest of my life.

36140494

How Did I Do It?

This is common sense, things we have heard a million times again and again. Change the way you eat. Exercise. Repeat. It’s amazing to me when people want to know my “secret.” I have no secret. And I find it even funnier when people feel let down by my answer. There is no magic pill. I have not dieted. I have not counted calories. I knew from the start that was not the way I wanted to live my life. This is a lifestyle change. Know that it’s going to be challenging, but have faith that you can make the changes you want to.

Amanda: After

About two years later now and around 125 to 135 pounds down, here I am. Still chugging along. Still making it part of my life to make better decisions for my own as well as my family’s health. Honestly, I still feel a little silly writing this. I have had people tell me that they think I am an inspiration, which blows my mind. But I am here to tell you: if I can do this, you can do this. All it takes is a true commitment. Am I a superfit person? No, of course not. But every day, I strive to be a little better. I am a real person who did this. I am a mom to three children with a full-time job, a husband, two dogs, and a million other things going on. It takes work. It takes time. But you can do this. Start today, one small change at a time. This is me — this is who I am. Today I will do what I can. Will you?

Do you have an inspiring Before & After story to share? Message us on Facebook, and give us a few details about your journey. We might even profile you on the site, like Amanda!

Read More

The Flat Iron That's Meant to Be Stored in Your Freezer

www.judgeweightloss.com

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

First, there was the age-old tactic of rinsing your hair with cold water after cleansing to lock in moisture and boost shine. Then came the “cool shot,” a function on your blow dryer that blasts cold air through the nozzle to hold your style of choice in place. Today, a hairstylist from New Zealand takes the concept of cold conditioning to a new level with an innovative tool that uses sub-zero temperatures to seal the hair cuticle, delivering hydration and a glossy finish.

RELATED: This Genius Hair Tool Creates a Perfect Blowout in 20 Minutes Flat

As effective as traditional methods of cold conditioning are, each has its downside. No one enjoys the feeling of freezing water trickling down their back in the shower, and the last thing you want is to blow a hairstyle that’s taken hours to perfect out of place with a wave of cold air from the cool shot.

Instead, the Inverse Hair Conditioning System is more precise. Modeled after a small, cordless flat iron, the tool clamps sections of your hair between two frozen plates to infuse your strands with moisture. “During scientific investigations, it was observed that subzero temperatures lock in moisture, which is the basis of healthy, more manageable hair,” says David Roe, founder of Inverse. “Inverse helps balance the effects of external elements and locks in moisture to keep it strong and healthy. It will also make the hair less susceptible to damage and breakage.”

RELATED: The Hottest Spring Nail Colors Right Now

Here’s how it works. Store the Conditioning System or just the Ice Cores (the system’s plates), in the freezer for at least two hours before using it. Unlike a general flat iron, Roe recommends using the Conditioning System on wet hair. For best results, towel-dry hair after cleansing, and spritz it with Inverse Ice Mist, a leave-in conditioner that preps hair for the treatment. “Now, we can’t give away all our secrets!” said Roe when asked to divulge the key ingredients in the Ice Mist. “Essentially, it’s a special formulation that has specific pH levels that will help close the cuticles of your hair, resulting in a softer, smoother finish.” Next, pass your hair through the system’s Ice Cores in sections from roots to tips. (The plates will stay cold for about 30 minutes.) Finish by styling as usual, but if possible, resist the urge to reach for your blow-dryer. “Try to stay away from heat,” says Roe. “It causes the most damage.”

RELATED: Hyaluronic, Glycolic, Salicylic: Which Acid Is Right for Your Skin Type?

What if you’ve got curly hair? Roe proclaims that the tool was conceived with curly hair in mind. “My wife experimented with an ice rinse after being told that cold water was beneficial to hair. After one rinse, she experienced reduced frizz and increased shine. Her curls held together and clumped in a way I’d never noticed before. The result was stunning and prompted further investigation. It wasn’t until we began developing the product that we found that all textures and lengths benefit from Inverse conditioning.” Roe says Inverse will not disrupt the hair’s curl pattern or hamper volume, and shares that his users find that their curls have better definition, bounce, and less frizz.

Inverse products can only be purchased in New Zealand and Australia at the moment, so here’s hoping that they land Stateside, stat.

This article originally appeared on InStyle. For more stories like this, visit InStyle.com.

Also check out healthywithjodi.com

Read More

14 Anxiety-Control Goals For 2017

www.popsugar.com/fitness/How-Manage-Anxiety-42885535

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

If anxiety has been ruling your life in 2016, then this new year is the time for you to have a fresh start. Make mental health resolutions that will help manage anxiety and give you a greater sense of control over your brain and your life.

You can implement these 14 things throughout the year or try one or two a month. Either way, you’ll be feeling stronger, more empowered, and happier every day. We all have anxiety, some of us more so than others — these things can help us keep it in check. Let’s do this!

40114160

Practice deep breathing. Get yourself a tracker or an app, or learn some techniques from yoga. Learning good, slow breathing techniques can come in handy if you’re experiencing a panic attack or extreme anxiety.
Take up a meditation practice. Whether it’s on a meditation app, in a class, with a YouTube video, or on your own, calming yourself at least once a day can help manage your anxiety in a powerful way.
Eat more foods with anxiety-reducing minerals. Did you know that there are foods that can calm you down? Omega 3s, B vitamins, magnesium, and more can all contribute to a greater sense of calm. Many therapists and psychiatrists also recommend a diet that is rich in foods like salmon, which are chock-full of mood-boosting omegas.
Start a gratitude journal. When everything feels too overwhelming, a journal can help. Write down all your thoughts, but also remind yourself of the positives and what is rooted in reality. Bring yourself to the present moment.
Find a therapist you love. You can only do so much on your own. If anxiety is a part of your everyday life, a therapist should be, too. Honestly, we can all benefit from therapy, and we could all stand to learn a little bit more about ourselves, our brains, and how we operate as individuals. Committing to regular therapy can help give you a sense of control over your life and your anxiety; it’s a built-in a support system and a safe place to talk about what you’re going through with tools that have been proven to work.
Find a workout you love. One that actually works for you and your anxiety. While yoga is calming and centering for many, some anxiety sufferers feel like it’s too much stillness and they’re left alone with overwhelming thoughts. Maybe you need a challenging new workout where you don’t have a second to think about anything but what you’re doing in that moment. Finding a workout that forces you to be present is imperative.
Take more self-care days. Too many plans and too many people asking for things from you can agitate your anxiety. Take a weekend day where you say no to plans and give yourself a break to do exactly what you need and want to do, even if that means doing nothing all day.
Disconnect from technology more. Are constant texts, emails, and social notifications bogging you down mentally and emotionally? Turn it off. Keep your phone charger away from your bed. Take a few hours a day to disconnect.
Try a natural practice, like reiki, acupuncture, oil diffusing, forest bathing, or earthing. Each of these holistic approaches have been shown to reduce stress, anxiety, and depression. Can’t hurt to try!
Have a mantra for the year: “Anxiety does not control me.” Repeating this to yourself can serve as a constant reminder that you are in control of your life and mental illness does not rule you. Everyone has anxiety; it’s what makes us human! What matters is our relationship with it. You wouldn’t let a friend control you, so don’t let your anxiety control you either.
Get more sleep. Sleep is a huge factor in reducing anxiety and stress. Make it a goal to get at least seven or eight hours per night.Remove unhealthy relationships and nurture the good ones. There are going to be people in your life who either just don’t understand anxiety or don’t make you feel good and perhaps make your anxiety worse. You don’t need those people in your life! Foster your relationships with the people who build you up, support you, and understand when you need some time to yourself. Those people are on your team and will be there for you for life.Cut back on caffeine. If you’ve known about your anxiety for a while, you’ll already know this, but if you’re just learning, it’s especially important to know: caffeine can trigger panic attacks. If you’re a daily coffee drinker, you might be surprised at how much it’s impacting your anxiety levels. Stop feeling bad about feeling bad. You’re not a bad person, there’s nothing wrong with you, and it’s OK to have anxious feelings. Feeling guilt or shame around your anxiety is only going to make things worse — they’re useless emotions that serve no purpose! Let go of the burden and know that it’s OK to not feel happy or 100 percent all the time.

Read More

It May Be Freezing, but Here's How 1 Girl Makes Winter Workouts Happen

www.popsugar.com/fitness/How-Work-Out-When-Cold-Dark-35881493

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

‘Tis the season to lose all fitness motivation . . . I’m serious! Once the cold weather hits and the holidays are in clear sight, my healthy eating goals go out the window, and so do my workouts. And with more hours of dark than daylight, just getting out from under my comforter can seem like too much effort. Luckily, I’ve learned my lesson — if I can get my butt to the gym or out the door to start a run, I can accomplish it — it’s just finding the motivation that’s truly a struggle. These seven tricks have helped jolt me back in to my routine, so give them a try!

Related: Hate Morning Workouts? You Should Probably Read This

Let There Be Light

When it’s dark in the morning, my first inclination is to just keep hitting snooze until I finally drag myself out of bed. To combat my early morning laziness, I’ve found one trick that seems to really work: turning on my light. As soon as my first alarm goes off, my arm shoots up and flips the switch, forcing me to be bathed in a warm glow. Soon, I’m out of bed and ready to get outdoors.

Warm Up Indoors

If I’m headed out on a run when the temperatures have dipped down, I wake up my mind and body with a quick warmup in the lobby of my apartment building. Sure, it looks a little silly if a neighbor catches me doing a few jumping jacks and high knees, but it’s well worth it.

Related: Reasons to Exercise Outside in the Winter

Gear Up

Most of the year, my go-to outfit is shorts and a t-shirt. But when I’m struggling to make it out in the chilly weather, cozy clothes make everything just a little bit better. Stylish outerwear built for the cold like warm jackets (with reflective strips if possible) or even running gloves make my time spent outdoors much more bearable.

Plug In

OK, this may seem like cheating, but on days when I’m struggling to get myself off the couch and into the gym, I’ll treat myself. I tote along my phone and play a favorite Netflix show while I hit the bike or elliptical. Getting engrossed in a favorite series is a foolproof way to distract you from a workout, and it’s a great way to get yourself up and off the couch — no watching unless your feet are moving!

Get Set to Sweat

I’m always cold during the Winter, so the one thing I really look forward to is getting toasty. Whether it’s hitting up a Bikram yoga class or just spending a few extra minutes in the sauna post-cycling class, just the thought of basking in the heat is enough to get me going.

Lug Your Gym Bag to Work

Winter nights are the death of evening workouts. When I leave the office in the pitch dark, all I can think about is curling up under my covers with a hot chocolate in one hand and a book in the other. But if I make sure to tote my gym bag to the office, I’ll know that the entire walk home I’ll have a constant reminder that the gym is just a quick walk away.

Recruit a Buddy

Yes, I know I’ve shared my love for running alone in the past, but desperate times call for desperate measures. During the Winter, one of the biggest tricks you can pull is recruiting a buddy to hit the gym with you. No matter what you do or at what time of day, enlisting a partner will mean that the moment you start to drag your feet on the way to work out, you’ll have no choice but to make it there anyway.

Read More

Even Optimists Tend to Expect the Worst

www.judgeweightloss.com/bikinibutt

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

Even if you consider yourself to be pretty upbeat, it’s easy to get caught up in feelings of dread as you wait to hear about uncertain news. As the moment of truth draws nearer, people often find themselves increasingly convinced that bad results are ahead.

These emotions may feel stressful and unhealthy, but a new study suggests they’re totally normal. In fact, this instinct to brace for the worst can actually be protective and serve as a buffer against potentially bad news, say researchers from the University of California Riverside.

In previous studies, it’s been recognized that, as individuals wait for their respective results, students become increasingly convinced they’ve failed an exam, patients become increasingly convinced they have a terrible disease, and voters become increasingly convinced that their candidate will lose an election.

RELATED: Optimism Can Help You Live Longer

Kate Sweeny, Ph.D., a psychology professor at UC Riverside, wanted to see if this was true of optimists and pessimists alike. “Intuition might suggest that some people are more likely to brace than others,” Sweeny said in a press release. “In particular, happy-go-lucky optimists would seem immune to the anxiety and second-guessing that typically arise as the decisive moment draws near.”

So she and her co-author performed nine different experiments in their lab and in real-life settings. Some involved college students anticipating rankings of their attractiveness from peers, for example, while others involved law-school graduates awaiting the results of their bar exams. All participants answered questions beforehand to determine their natural disposition.

The researchers’ findings, published in the Journal of Personality, were “counter to intuition,” Sweeny said. “Optimists were not immune to feeling a rise in pessimism at the moment of truth. In fact, not a single study showed a difference between optimists and pessimists in their tendency to brace for the worst.”

RELATED: Happy People Make Their Spouses Happier

There was a difference, unsurprisingly, in overall predictions: Optimists started out with more positive expectations than pessimists. But everyone in the study tended to shift those expectations downward over time.

This may be because not getting one’s hopes up can be a natural defense. “If you expect the worst, you can lessen feelings of shock and disappointment if things don’t go as you hoped,” Sweeny told RealSimple.com, “and you’ll be pleasantly surprised if they do.”

So if you feel down right before a big announcement, Sweeny says you shouldn’t necessarily fight those feelings. Rather, she says, we should all try to be more like the optimists in this study, and save our pessimism for these strategic moments.

“It’s generally good to be optimistic about the future,” she says. “Optimists are happier and healthier in lots of different ways, and it’s true that worrying too much or for too long can lead to anxiety and rumination. But in these final moments before you get big news, optimism can be really treacherous.”

In other words, she says, making sure you’ve done everything you can to ensure your chances of success—and then putting off your worries until those final moments—may be the best balance you can strike. And if you do feel like the world’s about to end while you wait, take heart in knowing that that’s normal, too.

This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

Also check out healthywithjodi.com

Read More

The Pull-Up Guide — It's Not as Scary as You Think!

www.popsugar.com/fitness/How-Do-Pull-Up-26103734

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

Despite what you might think, pull-ups are not impossible and can be adjusted for any fitness level. This infamous exercise offers a great upper-body workout that quickly tones the back, arms, and chest. Not only will it make you stronger, but conquering this move will also give an extra boost of confidence and help you feel like you can tackle anything — because, let’s face it, you can.

Beginner Pull-Ups

Assisted Pull-Up Machine: The pull-up machine is a great way to try your first go at pull-ups. The machine uses counterbalance weights, which means the higher the weight you set the machine, the easier the exercise becomes. Start by setting the weight to 20 pounds less than your weight, complete three to five reps, and then adjust the weight accordingly. Here are step-by-step instructions on how to use the assisted pull-up machine at your gym.
Band Pull-Up: With the help of a superband — a giant, two-inch-thick rubber band — you can tackle consecutive pull-ups. All you have to do is wrap the rubber band securely around the pull-up bar, put it under one knee (or one foot for even more assistance), grab onto the bar (stepping off a stool if needed to reach), and begin your pull-up. Superbands are the same length, but the wider the band, the more assistance. Eventually, you will no longer be a “groupie” to the band and will be able to use your body weight!

5514990

Intermediate Pull-Ups

Jump Pull-Ups: Consider jump pull-ups (pull-ups with a jump start) the next level after the assisted pull-up machine. Standing under the bar, jump up to grab the bar, harnessing the momentum of the jump to pull your body and chin to the bar. If your chin doesn’t come close to the bar, don’t give up — this move often takes practice.

Advanced Pull-Ups

Traditional Body Weight Pull-Ups: Using your body weight is the most traditional, but often the most challenging, way to complete a pull-up. With palms facing away from you, grip a pull-up bar with arms extended. Keeping your core tight while engaging your back and lats, bring yourself up until your chin passes above the bar, then lower yourself down into the starting position. The trick (and challenge) to any pull-up is to avoid swinging your entire body or using your neck for added momentum.
Weighted Pull-Up: When you’re ready, let your inner gymnast shine. Following the movements for a traditional pull-up, add a weighted plate for an extra challenge. Using a weight belt or simply holding a weight between your knees, you will be the star of the gym and any workout.

35123225

Read More