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Lips Are Movin (161 BPM Workout Remix)

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Workout Music 

Lips are Movin (Remix by Gareth Cleys 128 bpm)

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It May Be Freezing, but Here's How 1 Girl Makes Winter Workouts Happen

http://www.popsugar.com/fitness/How-Work-Out-When-Cold-Dark-35881493

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‘Tis the season to lose all fitness motivation . . . I’m serious! Once the cold weather hits and the holidays are in clear sight, my healthy eating goals go out the window, and so do my workouts. And with more hours of dark than daylight, just getting out from under my comforter can seem like too much effort. Luckily, I’ve learned my lesson — if I can get my butt to the gym or out the door to start a run, I can accomplish it — it’s just finding the motivation that’s truly a struggle. These seven tricks have helped jolt me back in to my routine, so give them a try!

Related: Hate Morning Workouts? You Should Probably Read This

Let There Be Light

When it’s dark in the morning, my first inclination is to just keep hitting snooze until I finally drag myself out of bed. To combat my early morning laziness, I’ve found one trick that seems to really work: turning on my light. As soon as my first alarm goes off, my arm shoots up and flips the switch, forcing me to be bathed in a warm glow. Soon, I’m out of bed and ready to get outdoors.

Warm Up Indoors

If I’m headed out on a run when the temperatures have dipped down, I wake up my mind and body with a quick warmup in the lobby of my apartment building. Sure, it looks a little silly if a neighbor catches me doing a few jumping jacks and high knees, but it’s well worth it.

Related: Reasons to Exercise Outside in the Winter

Gear Up

Most of the year, my go-to outfit is shorts and a t-shirt. But when I’m struggling to make it out in the chilly weather, cozy clothes make everything just a little bit better. Stylish outerwear built for the cold like warm jackets (with reflective strips if possible) or even running gloves make my time spent outdoors much more bearable.

Plug In

OK, this may seem like cheating, but on days when I’m struggling to get myself off the couch and into the gym, I’ll treat myself. I tote along my phone and play a favorite Netflix show while I hit the bike or elliptical. Getting engrossed in a favorite series is a foolproof way to distract you from a workout, and it’s a great way to get yourself up and off the couch — no watching unless your feet are moving!

Get Set to Sweat

I’m always cold during the Winter, so the one thing I really look forward to is getting toasty. Whether it’s hitting up a Bikram yoga class or just spending a few extra minutes in the sauna post-cycling class, just the thought of basking in the heat is enough to get me going.

Lug Your Gym Bag to Work

Winter nights are the death of evening workouts. When I leave the office in the pitch dark, all I can think about is curling up under my covers with a hot chocolate in one hand and a book in the other. But if I make sure to tote my gym bag to the office, I’ll know that the entire walk home I’ll have a constant reminder that the gym is just a quick walk away.

Recruit a Buddy

Yes, I know I’ve shared my love for running alone in the past, but desperate times call for desperate measures. During the Winter, one of the biggest tricks you can pull is recruiting a buddy to hit the gym with you. No matter what you do or at what time of day, enlisting a partner will mean that the moment you start to drag your feet on the way to work out, you’ll have no choice but to make it there anyway.

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The Surprising Way Arguing With Your Partner Affects Your Health

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Do you enter a fit of rage when arguing with your partner? Or do you completely shut down? Either way, you’re not doing any favors for your health. According to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley, and Northwestern University, how you react during a conflict with your partner might have serious consequences to your health.

For the study, published in Emotion, researchers looked at the relationships of 156 middle-aged and older heterosexual couples. Robert Levenson, the study author, tracked these couples since 1989. Every five years, the couples came into a lab and gave testimonials about what was happening in their lives, as well as the agreeable and tenuous points of their relationships. The interactions were coded and tracked for behavioral analysis and the spouses completed detailed surveys about their health.

Researchers looked for lips pressed together, knitted brows, tight jaws and raised or hushed voices as signs of anger. Signs of “stonewalling,” or shutting down emotionally during conflict, included a stiff face, rigid neck muscles and avoidance of eye contact.

At the end of the decade-long study, researchers found a distinctive link between these two conflict reactions and overall health: those who experienced outbursts of rage in reaction to their partner during the testimonials were more likely to have a cardiovascular problem at the end of the study. Those who stonewalled their partners had an increased risk of musculoskeletal ailments like back and muscle pain. Researchers found this effect even after controlling for age, education, exercise, smoking, alcohol use and caffeine consumption. The correlation was true for both partners, but was more pronounced for husbands.

The conflict that lasted just 15 minutes or less predicted the development of health problems for husbands 20 years in the future, said Claudia Haase, study author, in a statement. Researchers could, effectively, guess which ailment would strike which partner all based on how they reacted to the disagreement.

Need help keeping your anger (whatever way it manifests) at bay? Here, 16 ways to manage your frustration, whether you have a quick temper of a biting sense of humor.

Also check out http://healthywithjodi.com

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Next Week’s Supermoon May Be a Once in a Lifetime Event

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Fall 2016 is proving to be an exciting season for stargazers, with three consecutive supermoons (which happen when the moon is closest to Earth) occurring in October, November, and December. But the upcoming supermoon on Monday, Nov. 14 will be particularly special, due to a unique alignment of the Earth, moon, and sun. The moon will be the closest it's been to the Earth since January 26, 1948—the next similarly large supermoon won’t occur until November 25, 2034. In short: You won't want to miss it.

On the night of the supermoon, the diameter of the moon could appear up to 14 percent larger and the total area of the moon may look up to 30 percent larger and brighter, according to Jonathan Kemp, a telescope specialist at Middlebury College Observatory. The moon appears so large due to its positioning on its orbit.

“The moon’s orbit is not a circle, but rather an ellipse, just as with the planets,” Kemp says. “On average, the moon is about 239,000 miles away from the Earth. When it is at perigee, or its closest point to Earth, it can be about 225,000 miles away. When this happens during full moon, the apparent size of the moon, as seen from Earth, appears to increase.”

This month, the full moon will occur within about two hours of the moon’s perigee, causing the extra-special supermoon. And because there is typically one supermoon per year, the fact that there are three in three months is also pretty spectacular.

The best way to view the supermoon is look for it low in the sky (as it rises or sets near the horizon) with foreground reference points (like buildings) to provide some context, Kemp says. Because it’s a full moon, it will rise as the sun sets, and set as the sun rises. With binoculars, you’ll get an even more exciting sight.

“When the moon is full, the larger craters show 'ray' features, which look like lines pointing away from the crater, spanning much of the surface of the moon,” says Jason Kendall, who is on the board of the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York. "These 'rays' are streams of rock that were ejected when the crater was formed by a colliding asteroid long, long ago."

 

This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

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Love Ashley Graham? Here Are 9 Other Body-Positive Activists You Should Follow Too 

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Boosting your own body confidence starts with knowing you’re not the only one with cellulite, stomach rolls, or any other totally normal imperfections. That’s why seeing daily Instagram and Snapchat posts from body positive activists like Ashley Graham can be an instant mood- and confidence-booster—they show that health, beauty, and fitness come in all sizes. Here, we share our favorite curvy-girl role models who serve up lots of fierce full-body shots, sweaty gym mirror pictures, and the occasional selfie. Trust us, you’ll want to follow them all.

Candice Huffine

You may know Huffine as the first plus-size model to grace the pages of the iconic and risqué Pirelli calendar. Besides serving up super sexy editorial shots, she shares photos of her doing her favorite form of fitness—running. Huffine religiously uses the hashtag #getmovinghavefun, so her posts are sure to lift your spirits.

 

Nadia Aboulhosn

Have trouble fitting into those straight-sized Lululemon leggings? You and your booty will love model, fashion blogger, and designer Nadia Aboulhosn. She recently launched a fierce clothing line with Canadian plus-size brand Additionelle and isn’t afraid to make out-of-the-box fashion decisions. One scroll through her Instagram and you’ll want to be rocking body-con dresses, athleisure-inspired bodysuits, and short-shorts just like Aboulhosn does.

 

RELATED: Ashley Graham Has Something to Say About Her Body

Katie Willcox

If you feel like skinny girls are the only ones being portrayed as healthy on your social feeds, it’s time to give Katie a follow. She’s a model and the CEO and founder of Healthy Is the New Skinny, a movement that focuses on health and wellness rather than size. She posts lots of workout clips (even when she was pregnant!), and inspiring body-positive messages.

 

Bo Stanley

Surfer chick Stanley will have you feeling empowered by what your body can do, rather than what it looks like. Her Instagram is filled with beachy bikini photos, action shots of her surfing, and outdoor strength training and yoga videos. Stanely will inspire you to do what you love, regardless of what you look like doing it and most importantly, she’ll remind you to make working out fun.

 

Leah Kelley

This model isn’t afraid to speak out against the modeling industry’s unfair body standards. Her honesty will leave you feeling empowered to live a healthy lifestyle while loving your body. Plus, her second Instagram account, thickandtoned, features all of her go-to workouts—all the fitspo you need.

 

Denise Bidot

This curvalicious model recently launched her own self-love campaign, called There Is No Wrong Way to Be a Woman. Whether she’s showing off her stretch marks, posting the occasional workout photo, or snapping adorable selfies with her daughter, Bidot proves a woman can be anyone she wants to be—and that message is infectious as any.

 

RELATED: This Is What Happens to Your Body When You Stop Exercising

Tara Lynn

Plus-sized model Tara Lynn proves curves are always in style thanks to her mix of high-fashion editorial and behind-the-scenes snapshots. She consistently shares the hasthag #FashionDemocracy and believes women of all sizes should have access to fun clothing options. Trust us—you’ll want to take lots of fashion risks after scrolling through Lynn’s feed.

 

Marquita Pring

If being close friends with Ashley Graham isn’t enough to convince you to follow this model, her upbeat, fun-loving posts are sure to do the trick. Hit "follow" and your feed will be filled with fierce runway walks, workout sessions, and Pring-Graham best friend moments.

 

Jessamyn Stanley

In a world where women are often shamed for having belly fat, Stanley reminds us there’s nothing wrong with having a little more in the middle, and even to own our figures. The inspiring yogi proves size and shape don’t matter when it comes to practicing your favorite form of exercise. Follow her to flood your feed with expert-level yoga poses, rants that question fit-girl stereotypes, and overall body-positive realness.

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Natural Cures That Really Work

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Will placing a tea bag on a cold sore make it disappear? Can you ease hot flashes with herbs? And does putting yogurt on your nether parts have a prayer of curing a yeast infection? It used to be that you'd hear about these kinds of home remedies from your mom. These days, they're touted on websites, blogs, and online forums. In fact, 61% of American adults turn to the Internet to find help in treating what's ailing them, a 2009 study reveals. But do these natural moves actually work … and, just as important, could they do more harm than good? Health asked medical experts to weigh in on the Internet's most popular home cures.

The online claim: Yogurt can stop a yeast infection

Is it true? No

Yeast infections— and their symptoms, from intense vaginal itchiness to cottage cheese–like discharge—, are caused by an overgrowth of the fungus candida. Because studies show that yogurt can promote the growth of healthier strains of bacteria in the stomach and intestines, people have long assumed it might also keep candida in check. And that rumor keeps circulating, thanks to the Internet.

Unfortunately, "no study shows conclusively that eating yogurt cures or even lessens the severity of yeast infections," says Michele G. Curtis, MD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston. Neither will douching with yogurt, or (yikes!) dipping a tampon in the stuff, freezing it, and inserting it—a remedy suggested on some websites. In fact, douching can cause yeast infections, Dr. Curtis says, especially if youre using yogurt; its sugars could actually help yeast grow.

If youre sure you have a yeast infection, based on a past experience, Dr. Curtis recommends using an over-the-counter medication, such as Monistat. But, she points out, "everything that itches is not yeast!" So see your gyno when in doubt: That itching might actually be bacterial vaginosis, for instance, which requires treatment with antibiotics.

The online claim: Black cohosh eases hot flashes

Is it true? Yes

Commonly known as bugwort or rattle root, this herb is derived from a plant called Actaea racemosa. While it may sound like something from Harry Potters wizarding world, this remedy is not all hocus-pocus: Some studies suggest that black cohosh may indeed reduce hot flashes, according to guidelines re-released last year by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. "It appears to have an anti-inflammatory effect," says Philip Hagen, MD, coeditor of Mayo Clinic Book of Home Remedies.

In fact, the herb is often prescribed in Europe; its a key ingredient in Remifemin, a popular drug there, which is also available in the United States. While U.S. studies haven't conclusively proven that black cohosh works, Dr. Curtis says it cant hurt to try the herb—just consult with your doctor about the dosage first, and stick with it for 12 weeks, she says. (Make sure you're getting black cohosh, not blue cohosh, which could potentially be harmful, she adds.)

The online claim: Pop calcium pills to quell PMS cramps

Is it true? Yes

Since theres scientific evidence that PMS sufferers have lower levels of calcium in their blood, its not a stretch to think that loading up on it would ease the cramps, headaches, and bloating that come at that time of the month. Indeed, research has shown that taking 600 milligrams of calcium twice a day can reduce PMS symptoms. And getting the nutrient in your food (such as calcium-packed dairy) may keep them at bay altogether: In a recent study conducted at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, women who consumed four servings a day of skim or low-fat milk reduced their risk of developing PMS by 46%.

Note: Some women's cramps are so severe that only prescription medication can curb them, Dr. Curtis says. So if calcium doesn't make a difference with yours, see your doctor.

The online claim: Tea tree oil can zap your zits

Is it true? Maybe

One brand of tea tree oil sold online is dubbed "Pure Liquid Gold," and it just may be, at least in the case of acne. A study published in the British Journal of Dermatology found that applying the extract to pimples reduced inflammation. "Tea tree oil is antifungal and antibacterial," says Debra Jaliman, MD, a New York City–based dermatologist. "Its so effective that many of my patients prefer it to benzoyl peroxide."

Other experts are not so keen. "The oil can cause rashes and even blistering," warns Jerome Z. Litt, MD, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland and the author of Your Skin from A to Z. If you're nervous about using tea tree oil, Dr. Jaliman says, instead try a face wash for oily skin that contains salicylic or glycolic acid.

The online claim: Steam clears up sinus headaches

Is it true? Yes

This old-school treatment—touted in more than 400,000 Google results!—really works. "Inhaling steam flushes out your nasal passages, relieving sinus pressure," explains Neil Kao, MD, head of research at the Allergic Disease and Asthma Center in Greenville, South Carolina.

Add a few drops of peppermint or eucalyptus oil to make it more potent. "The minty smell causes a tingling sensation in the nasal membrane, and this has a decongestant effect," says Dr. Kao, who also suggests dabbing Vicks VapoRub at the lower rim of your nostrils. Another natural alternative: Using a neti pot to irrigate the nostrils with saline solution, which can also ease sinus symptoms, according to one study.

The online claim: Black tea bags help cold sores disappear

Is it true? No

If left alone, cold sores usually clear up in a few weeks—but who wants to wait? Online remedies for the blisters range from the absurd (like earwax) to the less silly, like placing a damp black tea bag on the sore. "Black tea leaves have tannins, compounds that may inhibit the growth of viruses and bacteria, but no studies have verified this," Dr. Hagen says. Tea bags may also have an anti-inflammatory effect, he says. But your best bet to shorten healing time is an OTC treatment like Abreva or a prescription med like Valtrex.

To prevent sores from popping up, stay out of the sun, and use a high-SPF sunscreen around your lips: "Sunlight can trigger cold sores if youre prone to them," Dr. Hagen says.

The online claim: Drinking cranberry juice prevents UTIs

Is it true? Yes

This popular home cure isn't just an old wives tale: Major medical institutions, including the National Institutes of Health, agree that drinking cranberry juice can be effective for treating urinary tract infections (UTIs). "The berries contain proanthocyanidins, which keep E. coli from attaching to the bladder wall and causing an infection," Dr. Hagen says.

If youre prone to UTIs, drink one to two glasses of cranberry juice daily to help prevent them. Doing so also works when you have symptoms—like a constant need to pee, or a burning sensation when you do—to speed recovery. (Theres also evidence that peeing immediately after sex can help prevent UTIs by flushing out bacteria.) Stick to juice that's at least 20% pure cranberry—or try supplements, taking up to six 400-milligram pills twice a day an hour before or two hours after a meal. If your symptoms don't end within 24 to 48 hours, see your physician—, especially if you have a fever or chills. "That points to something serious," Dr. Hagen says, "and means you should not be messing with a home remedy."

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Don’t Worry, Be Gloomy: Negative Feelings Have Benefits Too

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It’s been 53 years since the smiley face—that bright yellow circle with the schematic grin and black-dot eyes—first appeared.

Hundreds of millions of “Have a Nice Day” buttons, T-shirts, and coffee mugs later, it’s as iconic as the red, white, and blue. (And why not? After all, the “pursuit of happiness” is front and center in America’s Declaration of Independence.) 

In the digital age, the smiley face morphed into the emoticons and emojis that pop up everywhere. And with each advance—or, some might say, regression—in our consumer culture, in which marketers hustle to fulfill desires we didn’t even know we had, the blissed-out state of Mr. Smiley becomes ever more the Holy Grail, the organizing principle of our existence. 

Wait a minute. Isn’t happiness why we’re here? Isn’t happiness good for us?

Given a choice, we’d probably prefer to be slaphappy all the time, and there are advantages to that pleasurable state. More “positive” emotion is linked to a lower risk of various psychological illnesses, including depression, anxiety, and borderline personality disorder. 

Positive emotions also drive us to success, help us make better decisions, reduce the risk of disease and allow us to live longer. In some cases, they even help broaden how we think and act by directing our attention to new information and opportunities. They help build vital social, physical and cognitive resources that lead to positive outcomes and affiliations. 

Considering all of this, you might presume happiness ranks right up there with food and sunshine in its contribution to human well-being. But it is possible to have too much of a good thing—to not only be too happy but also experience the wrong types of happiness, and to go about trying to find happiness in the wrong ways and at the wrong time. 

I’m not saying it’s better to go around in a funk all the time. But I hope to get you to keep the pursuit of happiness in perspective, and to see your “negative” emotions in a new and more accepting light. In fact, I strongly submit that describing them as “negative” only perpetuates the myth that these useful feelings are, you know, negative. 

RELATED: How You Answer This Question May Say A Lot About Your Happiness

The downside of happiness

When we’re overly cheerful, we tend to neglect important threats and dangers. It’s not too big a stretch to suggest that being excessively happy could kill you. You might engage in riskier behaviors like drinking too much (“A fifth round on me!”), binge eating (“Mmm, more cake!”), skipping birth control (“What could possibly go wrong?”), and using drugs (“Let’s party!”). An excess of freewheeling giddiness and a relative absence of more sober emotions can even be a marker for mania, a dangerous symptom of psychological illness. 

People with high happiness levels sometimes exhibit behavior that is actually more rigid. That’s because mood affects the way our brains process information. When life is good, and when the environment is safe and familiar, we tend not to think long and hard about anything too challenging—which helps explain why highly positive people can be less creative than those with a more moderate level of positive emotion. 

When we’re in an “everything is awesome!” mood, we’re far more likely to jump to conclusions and resort to stereotypes. The happy more often place disproportionate emphasis on early information and disregard or minimize later details. This typically takes the form of the halo effect, in which, for example, we automatically assume that the cute guy we’ve just met at the party is kind, just because he wears cool clothes and tells funny jokes. Or we decide that the bespectacled, middle-aged man with a briefcase is more intelligent or reliable, say, than the 22-year-old blonde wearing hot pink Juicy Couture shorts. 

Our so-called negative emotions encourage slower, more systematic cognitive processing. We rely less on quick conclusions and pay more attention to subtle details that matter. 

(OK, the guy is hot, and he seems into you, but why is he hiding his wedding-ring hand behind his back?) Isn’t it interesting that the most famous fictional detectives are notably grumpy? And that the most carefree kid in high school is rarely valedictorian? 

“Negative” moods summon a more attentive, accommodating thinking style that leads you to really examine facts in a fresh and creative way. It’s when we’re in a bit of a funk that we focus and dig down. People in negative moods tend to be less gullible and more skeptical, while happy folks may accept easy answers and trust false smiles. Who wants to question surface truth when everything is going so well? So the happy person goes ahead and signs on the dotted line. 

The paradox of happiness is that deliberately striving for it is fundamentally incompatible with the nature of happiness itself. Real happiness comes through activities you engage in for their own sake rather than for some extrinsic reason, even when the reason is something as seemingly benevolent as the desire to be happy. 

RELATED: 9 Simple Steps to Happiness

Striving for happiness establishes an expectation and confirms the saying that expectations are resentments waiting to happen. That’s why holidays and family events are often disappointing, if not downright depressing. Our expectations are so high that it’s almost inevitable we’ll be let down. 

In one study, participants were given a fake newspaper article that praised the advantages of happiness, while a control group read an article that made no mention of happiness. Both groups then watched randomly assigned film clips that were either happy or sad. The participants who had been induced to value happiness by reading the article came away from viewing the “happy film” feeling less happy than those in the control group who had watched the same film. Placing too high a value on happiness increased their expectations for how things “should be,” and thus set them up for disappointment. 

In another study, participants were asked to listen to Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring,” a piece of music so discordant and jarring that it caused a riot at its 1913 debut. Some participants were told to “try to make yourself feel as happy as possible” while they listened to the music. Afterward, they evaluated themselves as being less happy compared with a control group that was not chasing Mr. Smiley. 

The aggressive pursuit of happiness is also isolating. In yet another study, the higher the participants ranked happiness on their lists of objectives or goals, the more they described themselves as lonely on daily self-evaluations. 

Happiness also comes in a variety of cultural variations that open up the possibility of being happy in the wrong way. In North America, happiness tends to be defined in terms of personal accomplishment (including pleasure), whereas in East Asia, happiness is associated with social harmony. Chinese Americans prefer contentment, while Americans with European backgrounds prefer excitement. Japanese culture is built around loyalty, with its connection to guilt, whereas American culture embodies more socially disengaged emotions, such as pride or anger. To be happy within a given culture depends more than a little on how in sync your feelings are with that culture’s definition of happiness. 

In short, chasing after happiness can be just as self-defeating as brooding and bottling up your emotions. It’s yet another coping mechanism for discomfort with “negative” emotions and our unwillingness to endure anything even remotely associated with the dark side. 

RELATED: Your Guide to Positive Thinking

Good news about bad moods

While it’s certainly not healthy to constantly stew in negative emotions, there are some positive things that sadness, anger, guilt, or fear can do. 

Help you form arguments. You’re more likely to use concrete and tangible information, be more attuned to the situation at hand and be less prone to making judgment errors, all of which lends an aura of expertise and authority that can make you a more persuasive writer and speaker. 

Improve your memory. One study found that shoppers remembered much more information about the interior of a store on cold, gloomy days when they weren’t feeling so exuberant than they did on sunny, warm days when life felt like a breeze. Research also shows that when we’re in a not-so-good mood, we’re less likely to inadvertently corrupt our memories by incorporating misleading information. 

Encourage perseverance. When you already feel great, why push yourself? On academic tests, an individual in a more somber mood will try to answer more questions—and get more of them right—than he or she will when feeling cheerful. 

Up your generosity. Those in negative moods pay more attention to fairness and are more apt to reject unfair offers. 

Boost your ability to reason. In a study of people with strong political opinions, those who were angry chose to read more articles that opposed their positions instead of practicing confirmation bias, the common tendency to seek out info that supports what we already believe to be true. After exploring these contrary views, they were more willing to change their minds. It seems that anger produces a “nail the opposition” mentality that encourages us to explore what the other guy has to say in order to tear it apart—ironically leaving the door open to being persuaded.

 

From Emotional Agility by Susan David, published on September 6, 2016, by Avery, an imprint of Penguin Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House, LLC. Copyright :copyright: 2016 by Susan David. 

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Full-body succession workout

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Designed to faciliate optimal body composition to burn maximum calories, this workout will help you build strength and tone. 

 

 

 

succession-training

The circuit training component targets muscular endurance and improves cardiovascular fitness by working the heart and lungs at a higher rate. It involves performing one set of each exercise with little or no rest in between until all the exercises have been completed.

 

“Traditional-style (succession) strength programs are when all sets of the first exercise are performed before progressing to the next exercise,” says trainer Nichelle Laus.

“By adding a succession routine to your current full-body circuit, it will help in maximising your strength and adding lean muscle mass.”

 

When choosing your dumbbell weight, err on the heavy side. “Succession programs generally use higher weights than circuit training,” Laus says. “This is key to building metabolically active lean tissue.”

 

What you’ll need:

» Workout bench

» 1 set of medium to heavy dumbbells

What you’ll do:

For Day 1 

Start with the Upper Body exercises. Perform one set of each exercise, then move on to the next exercise without rest. At the end of the Lower Body exercises, rest one minute, then repeat for a total of three circuits.

For toning, aim at 12 to 15 reps for each exercise.

For increasing strength and maximising muscular power, aim for 10 to 12 reps for each exercise.

For Day 2 

Start with the Lower Body exercises. Perform one set of each exercise, then move on to the next exercise without rest. At the end of the Upper Body exercises, rest one minute, then repeat for a total of three circuits.

For toning, aim at 12 to 15 reps for each exercise.

For increasing strength and maximising muscular power, aim for 10 to 12 reps for each exercise.

For Day 3 

Start with the Upper or Lower Body exercises. Complete three sets of the first exercise before moving on to the next. Repeat until all the exercises of the Upper and Lower Body exercises have been completed.

For toning, aim at 12 to 15 reps for each exercise, resting 60 seconds in between sets. For increasing strength and maximising muscular power, aim for 10 to 12 reps for each exercise, resting 90 seconds in between sets.

Exercises:

Upper Body

•Shoulder Press

•One-Arm Dumbbell Row

•Alternate Incline Dumbbell Bicep Curl

•Bench Dips

•Decline Push-ups

Lower Body

•Bench Hops

•Prone Glute Lifts

•Step-up with Knee Raise

Let’s get started!

Model: Chanel Sabovitch 

Words: Nichelle Laus

Photography: Dave Laus // davelaus.com

Shot on location at: Studio Two22

Hair and make-up: Two Chicks & Some Lipstick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shoulder presses (shoulder, triceps)

dumbellshoulder_succession.jpg

 

Hold a dumbbell in each hand and sit on a bench, with back support if possible.

Plant your feet firmly on the floor hip-width apart. Bend your elbows and raise your upper arms to shoulder height so the dumbbells are at ear level. Push the dumbbells up and in until the ends of the dumbbells touch lightly above your head. Lower back down to the starting position and repeat for amount of desired repetitions.

 

 

 

One-arm dumbbell row (middle back, biceps)

 

onearmdumbell-succession.jpg

 

Place a dumbbell on the left-hand side at one end of a flat bench.

Position yourself on the left side of a flat bench with your right knee and right hand resting on the bench.

Pick up the dumbbell with your left hand using a neutral grip. Slowly pull the dumbbell up as far as possible.

Pause and squeeze your shoulder blades together, and then slowly lower the dumbbell back to the starting position.

Repeat for amount of desired repetitions, and then repeat for your other side

 

 

 

 

Alternate incline dumbbell bicep curls (biceps)

 

alternateincline-succession.jpg

 

Grab a pair of dumbbells and sit down on an incline bench positioned at a 45-degree angle. Pull your shoulder blades back and let the dumbbells hang at your sides with your palms facing forward.

Curl one of the dumbbells up, bending the elbow and bringing the weight to your shoulder. Pause, then lower your arm back to starting position. Repeat for the amount of desired repetitions. Repeat with the other arm. 

 

 

 

 

Bench dips (triceps)

 

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Position your hands shoulder-width apart on a secured bench. Move your feet out as far out in front of you as possible. Straighten out your arms and keep a little bend in your elbows in order to always keep tension on your triceps and off your elbow joints. Slowly lower your upper body down towards the floor and keep your elbows tucked into your sides. Once you reach the bottom of the movement, slowly press off with your hands and push yourself back up to the starting position with your triceps. Repeat for desired amount of repetitions.

 

 

 

Decline push ups (chest)

 

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Get in the standard push-up position with your feet elevated on a bench (or other surface) and hands slightly wider than shoulder width. Your elbows should be completely locked out. While keeping your body straight, lower your chest to the floor. Pause and push back to the starting position. Repeat for desired amount of repetitions.

 

 

Bench hops (quads, glutes, core)

 

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Stand to one side of a flat bench with feet together. Holding the front of the bench, lean your weight into your hands and keep your feet together. Quickly jump up and over the bench. As soon as your feet touch the ground, jump back again. Continue jumping back and forth for desired amount of repetitions.

 

 

Step-ups with knee raise (glutes, hamstrings, quads)

 

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Stand facing a bench with your feet together. Step up, putting your left foot on the top of the bench. Extend through the hip and knee of your front leg to stand up on the bench. As you stand on the bench with your left leg, flex your right knee and hip, bringing your knee as high as you can. Reverse this motion to step down off the bench, and repeat the sequence on the opposite leg. Repeat for the desired amount of repetitions.

 

 

Prone glute lifts (glutes, hamstrings)

 

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Lie face down on a flat bench, hands holding under the front of bench.

Lift both legs upward and extend them in a ‘V’ position, keeping feet about six inches (15 cm) from the bench, squeezing the glutes until your lower abdomen is slightly elevated from the bench. Lower down and repeat for desired amount of repetitions. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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