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The Weight Loss Motivation Bible: How To Program Your Mind For Sustainable Fat Loss

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Instagram photo by Jimmy Smith • Jul 18, 2016 at 11:33am UTC

Women and #cardio Women burn more fat during exercise and use more glucose at rest than men who burn more glucose during activity but burn more fat at rest. This is another reasons why women burn less glycogen during training and can recover faster than men. Most male coaches just give their female clients less overall food and dont acknowledge the fat that women burn more fat during exercise but need carbohydrate as rest to recover. An additional study points to how women burn fat during exercise programs. Aerobically while…

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Fat Loss 

Weight Loss & Diet Plans: The 4 Keys to Proper Running Breathing!…

Weight Loss & Diet Plans: The 4 Keys to Proper Running Breathing! Source by julianmcgra0609

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This 12-Month "I Am Strong" Challenge Is Better Than Any New Year's Resolution

www.popsugar.com/fitness/How-Feel-Strong-42830535

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While New Year’s resolutions are often well-intentioned, the sad truth is that they usually fall out of focus sometime around February. Have you been there before? We certainly have. So what’s a more actionable way to meet your goals every month? Mix it up and have a clear objective month by month, rather than for the year overall.

This year’s mantra for us is “I am strong.” Do you need some strength in your life? Are you hoping to feel more empowered, more in control, and more self-loving? Take a look at the 12 ways we’re instilling this positive affirmation and living our strongest lives yet in 2017. You can mix up the months and customize your schedule and even fill in things that make YOU feel strong in particular.

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Each day of 2017, make it your goal to say, “I am strong” and live your life accordingly. These 12 unique monthly challenges will help you remember the end goal: self love and a happier, better life.

January Challenge: Try a New Workout

Pick a new style of workout, and commit to it all month long. It has to be something you’ve never done before! If you’ve never run before, give yourself a goal of running a mile without stopping by the end of the month. New to yoga? You’ll be amazed at how strong you get by committing to a few classes a week.

February Challenge: Compliment Yourself More

Make it a goal to give yourself five compliments a day for a month. These are words of affirmation that will build on your inner strength and self love, and they can be big things like, “I’m so intelligent,” or smaller ones like, “My hair looks fabulous!” (We picked up this tip from the inspiring health coach and fitness fashionista, Joanne Encarnacion.)

March Challenge: Set a Strength Goal

You don’t have to complete your goal in March, but you definitely have to set it and start working toward it. What strong thing do you want to accomplish this year? Complete a pull-up? 50 push-ups? Your first half-marathon? Maybe even a triathlon? Summit a mountain? Decide now what your goal will be, when you’ll complete it, and create a plan to work toward that goal.

April Challenge: Pack Your Fitness Schedule

This month, plan five workouts each week for the whole month. They can be at-home videos, group fitness at a studio, a run, a dance class, or personal training. Pick a way to move each day at the beginning of the month, and stick to your schedule.

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May Challenge: Gratitude Journal

Find a journal or notebook, and each day in May write down five to 10 things you’re grateful for. You’ll be mentally and emotionally equipped to handle anything!

June Challenge: Strong-Body Diet

This is your month to learn about macronutrients and focus on getting more protein to nourish your strong muscles. Make it a goal to learn four to six new protein-rich recipes and eat them throughout the month. When you feed your body the right foods, you’ll feel strong.

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July Challenge: Kickass Combat

Try boxing, Muay Thai, kickboxing, or a similar style of workout. You could even sign up for a self-defense class! Plan out your month and go at least four times.

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August Challenge: The Buddy System

In August, find an accountability partner. Whether it’s your best friend, sister, or co-worker, find someone in your life who wants to feel strong, too. Go to healthy lunches together, plan workouts, and shower each other with empowering and meaningful words of affirmation. “You’re so strong!” is always a good one. You’ll be stronger together, and sharing your strength with another person will make you feel incredible.

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September Challenge: Meditation and Affirmation

While we’re hoping you’ll tell yourself “I am strong” every day this year, September is your month to really drive that home. This month, try a 10-minute meditation practice each morning right when you wake up, before the day gets away from you. Body-positive superstar and Movemeant Foundation founder Jenny Gaither says she creates a new mantra for herself each week, like, “love continues to flow in and out of me,” for instance. Repeat your daily, weekly, or September mantra to yourself as you clear your mind through mental-strengthening meditation.

October Challenge: Learn a New Skill

While fitness is a surefire way to create a sense of strength, you can find it in other ways, too! By learning something new and challenging yourself, you’ll feel so empowered. This can be as simple as, “I’m going to learn how to poach an egg,” or “I’m going to learn five phrases in Italian this month.” If fitness is the only way for you, then loop back to the challenge from January, and pick up a new kind of workout, or an exercise move you’re trying to master — maybe a Turkish Get-Up?

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November Challenge: Heat Things Up

As the weather gets chilly, choose workouts that make you really, really sweaty. Whether it’s hot yoga or an intense indoor cycling class, bring on the sweat! Also, if you haven’t yet, make sure you’re completing your strength goal from March.

December Challenge: Give Back

Choose a charity, cause, or nonprofit to focus your efforts on. You can even commit to a random-act-of-kindness challenge. Adopting more charitable habits, giving more of yourself, and doing something to help others will help you feel strong — especially when you know someone else needs a little extra strength. The power you’ve created all year long is ready to explode and impact the world in a great way. You did it!

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Why You Should Be Putting Lemonade In Your Coffee

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As cooling caffeine-delivery systems go, your standard issue cold brew is pretty hard to beat. Hard… but, it turns out, not impossible. The evidence? Consider the Thunderbolt, an icy, tart, insanely refreshing drink that’s just a simple combo of espresso and lemonade. (And which I’ll be drinking every afternoon from now until November.)

I first encountered the Thunderbolt two years ago at Smith Canteen, a cafe in my Brooklyn neighborhood, and was immediately hooked. Since then, I’ve discovered that the formula, though inspired, is not wholly original—and actually has a devoted following among coffee geeks everywhere from Sweden to Mexico.

RELATED: 4 Genius Breakfast Ideas That Start With Avocado

The best part about this new breed of icy beverage? It really couldn’t be easier to make at home—no fancy gear required. Just grab yourself a glass, fill it with ice, and combine lemonade with a shot or two of chilled espresso or cold brew concentrate. Store-bought lemonade is fine (I’m partial to Newman’s Own) as long as it’s not too sweet.

Or, if you really want to play around, try swapping out the still stuff for some sparkling lemonade instead. Indeed, while its origins are hard to pin down, with its tart, citrusy edge, the Thunderbolt does have a lot in common with the espresso tonic, another (seemingly Swedish-derived) coffee trend that’s been the darling of craft coffee shops for a few summers now. (For the uninitiated, it is exactly what it sounds like: a glass of tonic water over ice, topped with a shot of espresso.)

RELATED: 14 Trader Joe’s Items That Will Basically Change Your Life

Coffee and soda hybrids of all stripes might just be the “it” drinks of the summer. During a recent swing through Charleston, SC, I stopped in at the Daily and sat in the sun sipping a delightful combination of grapefruit soda and espresso, garnished with a twist of orange peel. At Cocoa Cinnamon in Durham, NC, you can order a dark and sweet Kokytu, which consists of an espresso over an iced cane sugar Mexican Coke. And, at the new Stumptown cafe in New Orleans’ Ace Hotel, they’re serving the “Endless Summer,” a julep-inspired concoction made from cold brew laced with mint simple syrup and sparkling water.

But why stop there? We’re already dreaming of an amped-up espresso Dark and Stormy and a cherry cola cold brew.

This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

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9 Health Editors Share How They Practice Self Care

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Between long hours at work, weekend chores, dinner plans with friends, and time for your family, your calendar is overflowing. But can you remember the last time you took an hour, maybe even two, for yourself? If you had to think longer than a few seconds, you may want to consider taking a step back and reevaluating your schedule. Prioritizing everyone else in your life may seem honorable, but the reality is, totally neglecting yourself isn’t good for anyone. In order to take care of others, you first need to take care of yourself. (It's kind of like the safety messages on airplanes: "In the event of an emergency, please put on your oxygen mask before assisting others.”) So whether you’re facing a rough patch or simply going through the day-to-day grind, self-care should always be on your agenda. Need some inspiration on how to spend your me-time? Here are some self-care practices the editors at Health swear by.

RELATED: 5 Powerful Mantras to Help You Quiet Anxiety, Beat Self-Doubt, Manage Stress, and More

Sweat it out

"It’s the answer you always hear, but making time every day to exercise is my form of self-care. I’m a firm believer in that saying, ‘You’re only one workout away from a good mood.’ In particular, boxing is a huge physical and mental release for me, and barre classes take me back to my ballet days, which feels especially therapeutic. My other self-care move is curling up in my giant fuzzy blanket and watching Sex and the City reruns. It’s mindless and relaxing and just feels great sometimes." —Jacqueline Andriakos, associate editor

Tune in to YouTube

"When I’m feeling down, I typically turn to my favorite form of escapism: YouTube videos. Having a moment when I can just veg out, slap on a calming sheet mask, and watch a video by one of my favorite YouTubers (looking at you, Estée Lalonde and SoothingSista), allows me to momentarily get out of my own head. It might sound silly, but just like reading a good book, watching a good YouTube video takes me out of my own world and into someone else’s, even if just for 10 minutes. It’s enough time for me to put my thoughts and feelings into perspective and luckily, if I need more than 10 minutes of down time, there’s a whole YouTube world out there waiting for me to enjoy."—Julia Naftulin, editorial assistant

RELATED: 8 Relaxing Gift Ideas for a Friend Who's Stressed to the Max

Create a relaxing routine

"I’ve recently started a new nighttime self-care routine that I think has been helping me de-stress and fall asleep a little more easily. Step 1: Turn off the TV around 10 p.m. and force myself to stop refreshing my Facebook feed. Step 2: Make a cup of chamomile tea. Step 3: Turn off all lights in my bedroom, light a few candles, and set up my yoga mat. Step 4: Do the “Bedtime Yoga” sequence from Yoga by Adriene. It’s a 36-minute gentle yoga routine that includes moves to help you unwind and relax muscles, plus a short meditation to set your intentions for the following day." —Kathleen Mulpeeter, senior editor

Grab some knitting needles

"Lately I’ve been doing a lot of knitting. At first it was for practical reasons (I’m making my husband a scarf for Christmas), but I’ve found it has emotional benefits too. The repetitive motion is super soothing, almost meditative—it’s a great before-bed wind-down activity. I’m just bad enough a knitter that I have to concentrate a little on what I’m doing—I can’t knit on autopilot—so it’s very absorbing. I can be sitting on the couch or at the sidelines during my kids’ sports activities and find that 30 minutes has gone by without my even noticing. There’s the satisfaction of having something real and tactile to show for my time. Best of all, it keeps both hands busy so I stay off my phone!" —Jeannie Kim, executive deputy editor

"A few years ago I was going through a rough period in my life and I decided to take up knitting at night when I was having a hard time sleeping. My aunt had taught me the basic stitch when I was a teenager, so I went to my local Michael’s store and bought a bright chunky ball of yarn and got started. Since then, I’ve knit scarves for everyone I love, and this winter I’m planning on paying it forward with a knitting circle making scarves for homeless people in NYC." —MaryAnn Barone, social media editor

RELATED: A Meditation for Dealing With Conflict

Escape with Friends

"There is nothing better than coming home after a long day, lighting some great smelling candles, having a cup of tea and reading a good book in my bed. If I’m not in the mood to focus on a book, I’ll instead put on Friends or some other happy, funny TV show in the background and play games on my iPad. I could do that for days." —Chelsey Hamilton, editorial assistant

Pound the pavement

"If I can, I head out for a run. Especially in the cold weather, a run is very meditative for me—hearing each foot strike and a steady breath can be extremely grounding. And as someone who can’t sit still, classic meditation/breathing exercises do almost nothing for me to relax. Running is also a huge confidence boost—I feel powerful and in control of my body and mind. In training for races, I’ve forgotten how much a run can absolutely turn around my perspective. When you’re going out for a predetermined amount of miles, at a certain pace, on already tired legs, it can feel like such a chore. But last week, when I was feeling stressed and antsy, I decided to head out the door and run for however long I felt like. I came back feeling relaxed and re-centered." —Alison Mango, editorial producer

Pick up a good read

"I know it sounds cliché, but getting lost in a book is my favorite form of self-care. With a two-year-old at home, I don’t have that much time to read. But I sneak in 10 minutes here and there—on the bus, while my son naps, before bed. Right now I’m halfway through Amy Schumer’s The Girl With the Lower Back Tattoo, and it is exactly the escape I need." —Catherine Di Benedetto, features director

RELATED: 7 Health Truths We Wish We Knew In Our 20s

Laugh at what you know

"For me, self-care is curling up on the couch and watching a TV show that makes me laugh. When I’m feeling stressed, my go-tos are reruns of Seinfeld, Parks & Recreation, 30 Rock, and The Office—I’ve seen all the episodes more times than I can count, but that’s the beauty of it. Watching them helps shut off the negative part of my brain for a while." —Christine Mattheis, deputy editor

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6 ways to manage PMS

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PMS is no fun. Here, we share six ways to help and manage your PMS.

1. Food

Stabilising blood sugar will favour consistent energy levels and moods according to dietitian Melanie McGrice (melaniemcgrice.com.au). “Grains that have a low glycaemic index, which means that they provide longer-lasting energy, can also help to increase the hormone serotonin in the brain, so try some chickpeas, brown rice or quinoa,” says McGrice.

2. Diet

According to accredited practising dietitian Lisa Yates, some studies show that PMS may be exacerbated by too much caffeine, sugar and alcohol. To minimise symptoms, she suggests that you reduce your alcohol, caffeine and salt intake, and follow a low-GI diet.

3. Supplements

Professor Kulkarni says supplements such as evening primrose oil can be effective for relieving PMS symptoms and favours these as a primary intervention before resorting to the contraceptive pill. “The two supplements I suggest are vitamin B6 and evening primrose oil, which has healthy essential fatty acids. Both supplements have been shown in studies to help alleviate some symptoms in women with PMS and many women benefit from them,” Prof Kulkarni says. A study published in 2010 found that the combination of magnesium and vitamin B6 was particularly helpful for decreasing PMS symptoms. “Nuts are rich in both magnesium and B6, so I’d recommend taking 30 g unsalted nuts daily in the week prior to your period,” says McGrice.

Correcting iron deficiency may also ease syptoms as women who consume insufficient iron are at higher risk of suffering PMS according to University of Massachusetts research. Women with higher non-heme iron, which comes from plant sources, are 30 to 40 per cent less likely to experience PMS. This is possibly because low iron affects levels of serotonin, the hormone that elevates mood. Good sources of non-heme iron include silverbeet and spinach, broccoli, bok choy, soybeans and lentils.

4. The Pill

Contraceptive pills can help ameliorate symptoms of severe PMS and PMDD, but not all pills are equally effective. “Women should not take older-style progesterone pills as these can actually contribute to emotions like anger and depression,” warns Prof Kulkarni. “Some of the newer varieties of pill such as Zoely, Diane and Juliet can be very beneficial.”

To establish a more stable hormonal pattern, women may take the pill with the active hormones for three cycles then go on to a sugar pill for one week only, so that within a three-month cycle they only have one week of bleeding.

5. Hormone therapy

The next line of defence is hormone therapy according to Prof Kulkarni. Oestrogen patches or oestradiol patches and progesterone can cause a kind of hormone detour. “For some women who are very sensitive to hormones, another alternative is to deliver the progesterone via the Mirena IUD, which is placed in the uterus. This allows the hormones to go directly into the surrounding organs rather than passing through the bloodstream first, where it may cause more side effects,” Prof Kulkarni says.

6. Antidepressants

For women who feel their lives are hijacked by hormones every month, antidepressants can provide enormous relief. “The antidepressants stabilise the level of hormones like serotonin, so some women with PMS or PMDD no longer experience those huge mood swings from hormonal fluctuations,” says Davison. 

A new approach to this treatment is to take the antidepressant intermittently. “It may be taken for one week or 10 days of each month when symptoms occur,” says Prof Kulkarni. “To ensure the dose and type of antidepressant suits your system, speak to your GP about having a blood test or swab to get background on your metabolic system and guide the choice of antidepressant.” 

If antidepressants are not effective, women who suffer severe symptoms of PMS may then choose to undergo a ‘chemical menopause’, where strong hormones are used to stop ovulation and give women a break from the terrible hormonal and mood swings. “This approach sometimes needs to be permanent but can also have a kind of resetting effect on the brain,” Prof Kulkarni explains. “If women choose to come off the hormones, their impact is usually reversible and even when no longer on the therapy, the hormonal-related moods swings may be greatly reduced.” 

 

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The ‘Love Hormone’ May Help People With Ringing in Their Ears

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THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News)—People suffering from chronic ringing in the ears—called tinnitus—may find some relief by spraying the hormone oxytocin in their nose, a small initial study by Brazilian researchers suggests.

Oxytocin—dubbed the “love hormone” because it promotes social connections—might also help relieve the annoying and sometimes disturbing noises of tinnitus.

“Oxytocin has actions in the brain and the ear that may help in tinnitus treatment and provide immediate relief,” said lead researcher Dr. Andreia Azevedo. She is with the department of otolaryngology at the Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo.

But, at least one hearing specialist was unconvinced that oxytocin would help.

And, even Azevedo said it isn’t clear how oxytocin might work to relieve tinnitus. She speculated that it may have an effect in the ear, probably related to fluid regulation in the inner ear, and a brain effect that may be related to the production of the neurotransmitter dopamine.

“For some patients, tinnitus disappeared or reached a non-distress level,” Azevedo said. “As usual in tinnitus treatment, in some patients the tinnitus kept low, and for some it raised after drug therapy ended.”

Although oxytocin appeared safe, its long-term effects aren’t known, Azevedo said. “We did not have any side effects, but further larger studies are necessary to establish the role of oxytocin in tinnitus treatment,” she added.

The research team is conducting additional studies to see if increasing doses of oxytocin can improve and lengthen the response.

“We expect that these trials will raise the interest in this drug and result in larger randomized trials,” Azevedo said.

The results of the study were scheduled to be presented Thursday at the meeting of the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery in San Diego. Findings presented at meetings are generally viewed as preliminary until they’ve been published in a peer-reviewed journal.

As many as one in 10 Americans suffers from tinnitus. The disorder is characterized by hearing sounds when there are none. The sounds can be perceived as ringing, buzzing, crickets or hissing. For those who struggle with it daily, the noise is so bothersome that it interferes with thinking, emotions, hearing, sleep and concentration, according to a previously published study. That study was released online July 21 in JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery.

For the new study, the researchers randomly assigned 17 people with tinnitus, average age 63, to puffs of oxytocin or a placebo (distilled water) in each nostril.

The study volunteers were asked to assess their symptoms 30 minutes after treatment, and then again, 24 hours later.

Azevedo’s team found that patients who received oxytocin reported a significant reduction in tinnitus, compared with those who received the placebo.

Dr. Darius Kohan is chief of otology/neurotology at Lenox Hill Hospital and Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital in New York City. “It’s good people are doing research on this,” he said, “because there isn’t any one treatment that works very well.”

Kohan remains skeptical, however, about using oxytocin to treat tinnitus, because so many treatments have been tried and have failed.

“Whenever there is a medical condition and there are a thousand different treatments, it means that none of them work, because if there was one that worked we would all be doing it,” he said.

Results of this small trial are not sufficient to draw any conclusions about oxytocin as a treatment, Kohan added.

“There are too many ifs with this. Is it possible that it helps? Yes. Is it possible it’s a placebo effect? Yes,” Kohan said. “You can’t tell from this small study whether or not the treatment is effective over the long term.”

In addition, he said, the hormone can have serious side effects, including abnormal heartbeat, abnormally low blood pressure, high blood pressure, allergic reactions, breathing difficulty, nausea and vomiting.

People suffering from tinnitus shouldn’t start using oxytocin in hopes of curing themselves, Kohan said.

“This is not something you take lightly. You don’t know if it has benefits in the long term, and you can potentially have bad side effects. I would not recommend it,” he said.

More information

For more on tinnitus, visit the American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery.

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Healthy raw vegie salad recipe

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Looking for healthy lunch ideas? This raw vegie salad is such an easy and tasty way to introduce raw vegetables into your diet on a daily basis. 

Eating raw vegetables means that you’re receiving the full nutrient potential of that vegetable, as nothing is lost through the cooking process. Needless to say, selecting seasonal organic produce is ideal for this, but don’t be too worried about following the recipe to the letter – use anything you like from your crisper.

Ingredients

¼ iceberg lettuce, finely shredded
¼ small red cabbage, finely shredded
1 large beetroot, julienned
½ zucchini, finely sliced
½ red onion, finely sliced
½ granny smith apple, julienned
3 radishes, finely sliced
1 handful of snow peas, strings removed, sliced in half lengthways
1 handful of flat-leaf parsley, leaves picked and roughly chopped
1 pomegranate, cut in half
Salt flakes and freshly ground peppe
r4 tbsp birdseed mix (chia seeds, poppy seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, flaxseeds or whatever you have in the pantry)
2 tbsp roughly chopped salted cashews

Lemon dressing

75 ml good-quality olive oil
2 tsp honey
1 tsp Dijon mustard
Finely grated zest of 1 lemon and juice of 2 lemons
Salt flakes and freshly ground pepper

Method

To make the lemon dressing, combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and season to taste.

Add the lettuce, cabbage, beetroot, zucchini, onion, apple, radish, snow peas and parsley to a large bowl. Add the lemon dressing to taste and, using your hands, carefully toss.

Hit the back of each pomegranate half with a wooden spoon so that the juicy seeds pop out onto the salad. Season and gently toss.

Transfer the salad to a serving bowl and sprinkle the seed mix and cashews over the top before serving.

This recipe originally appeared in nourish magazine.

Want more healthy lunch ideas? Try this pumpkin and feta chicken salad.

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