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Before and After 2 Years Natural Body Transformation INTERVIEW. See his routine …

Before and After 2 Years Natural Body Transformation INTERVIEW. See his routine and inspiring transformation video! #bodytransformation #beforeandafter #weightgain #bodybuilding muscletransform.com Source by bodytransform1

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Interview with a Nutritarian: Anthony : Disease Proof

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Iskra Lawrence Opens Up About Her Past and Reminds Us That We Are the Only Ones in Control of Our Lives

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When Iskra Lawrence was just 16 years old, her modeling agency dropped her for being too curvy; now, at 26 years old, when we hear her name we immediately think of body positivity and confidence. For Iskra and many other women, her journey to feeling this way was tough, and now she’s opening up about how she got to this place in her life in the January/February cover feature of SELF magazine.

The British model has gathered over 2.9 million Instagram followers thanks to her authenticity and genuine ability to keep it real, all while radiating sexiness and humor. When she stripped down to her bra and underwear on a New York City subway to spread a message about vulnerability, it didn’t matter that she wasn’t wearing clothes because everyone was blown away by her message. Iskra tried every diet under the sun when she was younger, but eventually realized she wanted to embrace being different in the modeling industry, and that’s when her message spread like wildfire.

“Once I convinced myself I could do this, I was able to convince them,” she told SELF, referring to modeling agencies. “I saw it as a way to express myself and show that I’m more than a set of measurements.” Iskra jokes about her “tiger stripe stretch marks” and “cellulite lightning bolts,” but above all of that, she’s changing the lives of so many women.

From her appreciation for McDonald’s to her ability to control her own future, Iskra is telling all, and it’s motivating us to bring on 2017 with confidence, humor, and an unwavering feeling of self-love. Keep reading to see everything Iskra had to say about her journey and the amazing ways she’s transformed.

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Newsweek Writer Says Tweet Caused Epileptic Seizure

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There's no question certain tweets can throw you for a loop. But can a tweet actually cause a seizure?

Newsweek senior writer Kurt Eichenwald—who has publicly revealed that he has epilepsy—says a troll sent him a malicious tweet meant to do exactly that, and it worked.

After Eichenwald appeared on Tucker Carlson Tonight last Thursday, he wrote a series of tweets referencing his acrimonious interview with the Fox News anchor. Apparently the seizure occurred later that night: Newsweek reports that another user sent Eichenwald an image of a strobe light with the message, "You deserve a seizure for your postings." 

On Friday, Eichenwald announced that he would be taking a break from the social media platform: "I will be spending that time with my lawyers &  law enforcement going after 1 of u…" 

"This not going to happen again," he wrote in another tweet. "My wife is terrified. I am … disgusted."

According to Newsweek, Eichenwald's lawyer has filed a criminal assault complaint with the Dallas Police Department, and plans to file a similar complaint in the jurisdiction of the user once that person is identified.

RELATED: 6 Things That Can Trigger a Seizure Even If You Don't Have Epilepsy

So how could a tweet trigger an epileptic seizure? We asked Derek Chong, MD, director of the epilepsy program and vice chair of neurology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, to explain: "There are some people who are very susceptible to strobes and flashing lights. If you open the message and it automatically plays and you’re really susceptible to it, you could potentially have a seizure." (Dr. Chong is not familiar with the specifics of Eichenwald's experience.)

This would fall into the category of photosensitive epilepsy, one of several reflex epilepsies—epiliepsies where an outside stimulus brings on seizures, Dr. Chong explains. The stimulus can be something in the environment, like a certain smell or noise, or can involve more complex behaviors such as reading, bathing, eating, doing math, or even thinking about certain topics. (Sometimes, a specific type of music can trigger seizures—one woman on Long Island had seizures whenever she heard Sean Hall on the radio, says Dr. Chong.) Reflex epilepsies account for about 5% of all cases of epilepsy; photosensitive epilepsy comprises 3% of total cases. Flashing lights are "a well-known trigger," says Dr. Chong. 

RELATED: 9 Foods That May Help Save Your Memory

Other factors besides an outside stimulus can trigger a seizure. If Eichenwald had already had a stressful day, for instance, and the level of excitability in his brain was already pushed very high, then "this could have been the straw that broke the camel’s back,” Dr. Chong explains. 

Fortunately, Eichenwald seems to be okay. Earlier today, he reiterated his outrage on Twitter, and tried to put the seriousness of the attack in context: "Folks, if a blind man says things you don't like politically, it is not okay to direct him toward the edge of a cliff. Find some humanity."

The writer's metaphor is no exaggeration. Each year, some 50,000 people in the United States die as a result of seizures. In general, people with seizures have up to triple the risk of dying than someone without.

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5 Times Ronda Rousey Got Real About Her Body

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It’s been a big week for Ronda Rousey. On Sunday the MMA fighter was crowned one of three cover models for this year’s Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issueand became the first athlete ever to be featured on the cover. Then on Monday, she appeared on The Ellen Degeneres Show and bravely revealed that she experienced suicidal thoughts after her shocking UFC title loss to Holly Holm last fall. “I was sitting in the corner and I was like, What am I anymore if I’m not this?” she explained in the emotional interview.

Opening up about such a heartbreaking experience couldn’t have been easy. But Rousey’s honesty is just one of the many reasons we love her. Not only is she an incredible athlete, she’s also a feminist icon and an outspoken advocate for body positivity. Here, five of the quotes that have earned her legions of fans, and made her the role model we always wanted.

RELATED: The 10 Best Quotes from Ronda Rousey’s “Ask Me Anything” Reddit Interview

On why she wanted to model for SI

“[Sports Illustrated] has given me so much opportunity,” she said in a behind-the-scenes video at her SI cover shoot. “[They] set a precedent for what society expects out of women’s bodies, and they’re really setting a really healthy and positive standard for all women.” This isn’t the first time that Rousey has modeled for the Swimsuit Issue. In a similar behind-the-scenes video last year, she spoke about the importance of featuring women with diverse body types in the media. “I was so happy to have this opportunity because I really do believe that there shouldn’t be one cookie-cutter body type that everyone is aspiring to be,” she said. “I hope the impression that everyone sees in the next Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue is that strong and healthy is the new sexy. And that the standard of women’s bodies is going into a realistic and socially healthy direction.”

On her ideal weight

After the 2015 Swimsuit Issue hit newsstands, Rousey told Cosmopolitan.com that she chose to gain weight before she stripped down for the photo shoot“I felt like I was much too small for a magazine that is supposed to be celebrating the epitome of a woman,” she said. “I wanted to be at my most feminine shape, and I don’t feel my most attractive at 135 pounds, which is the weight I fight at. At 150 pounds, I feel like I’m at my healthiest and my strongest and my most beautiful.”

RELATED: 5 Times Ronda Rousey Seriously Inspired Us

On being called “masculine”

Last August Rousey won the UFC 190 against previously undefeated fighter Bethe CorreiaIn a video promoting that fight, Rousey responded to body-shaming critics“Listen, just because my body was developed for a purpose other than f—ing millionaires doesn’t mean it’s masculine. I think it’s femininely badass as f— because there’s not a single muscle on my body that isn’t for a purpose.”

On accepting her body

Despite her natural toughness, Rousey isn’t immune to body image issues. “I absolutely loathed how I looked until I was around 22 years old,” she said in an interview with ESPN.com last year. “What changed for me is I was always thinking I wanted to make my body look a certain way so I would be happy. But when I made myself happy first, then the body came after. It was a journey of self-discovery and trial and error.”

Rejecting the idea of a one-size-fits-all body type helped Rousey find self-acceptance: “The image in my head was the Maxim cover girl,” she said. “In the end, instead of making my body resemble one of those chicks, I decided to try to change the idea of what a Maxim chick could look like.”

RELATED: The 10 Best Body-Positive Quotes from Female Athletes Who Posed Nude for ESPN

On developing a healthy relationship with food

In an Ask Me Anything on Reddit last year, the fighter mentioned her complicated history with food. “It feels very liberating to [be] free of the guilt that used to come with every meal,” she wrote. “I feel like I have so much extra space in my brain now that I’m not constantly thinking about the next meal and trying to eat as much as possible every day while still losing weight. I feel amazing. I (think) I look amazing. And I just ate some bomb-ass french toast this morning.”

Not long after, Rousey elaborated on her struggles with disordered eating in an interview with Elle.com. Participating in judo tournaments led her to develop an “unhealthy relationship with food” in her teenage years, she explained. She had to hit a certain number on the scale to compete. “I felt like if I wasn’t exactly on weight, I wasn’t good-looking,” she said. “It was a lot to get past, and now I can say that I’ve gotten through it, I’ve never been happier with how I look [or] more satisfied with my body. It was definitely a journey to get there.”

Rousey added that she hopes she can encourage others struggling with similar issues to seek help. “These are issues that I think every girl deals with growing up, and it’s something that’s largely ignored and unaddressed. I would like that to be different for girls growing up after me. It shouldn’t have been as hard as it was.”

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4 Tips for Handling a Narcissistic Boss

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From The Office’s Michael Scott to Miranda Priestly in The Devil Wears Prada, narcissistic bosses are portrayed on TV and in movies as demanding, lacking in empathy, and pathologically self-important—which is preeetty much dead on, according to research.

In a 2011 study published in Psychological Science, researchers observed 150 people and found that those with narcissistic personalities made terrible leaders, because their self-centeredness interfered with the creative exchange of ideas and hindered group decision-making. In fact, narcissists often rise to the top precisely because they are so conceited. A study done at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln found that narcissists scored higher in simulated job interviews than equally-qualified non-narcissists. “[An interview] is one setting where it’s OK to say nice things about yourself and there are no ramifications. In fact, it’s expected,” co-author Peter Harms explained in a university press release.

The good news? Having a narcissistic boss doesn’t necessarily mean you need to give notice. Here, psychotherapist Joseph Burgo, PhD, the author of The Narcissist You Know ($25; amazon.com), shares some helpful tips for managing up.

GIf: Giphy.com

RELATED: 10 Signs You Might Be a Narcissist

Figure out who you’re dealing with

Does your boss need to be the center of attention? Hold grudges? Give (often unsolicited) advice? These are all telltale signs of a narcissistic personality. But there are also workplace-specific red flags, says Burgo. “A narcissistic boss might be unable to compromise or accept input from the rest of the team,” he says. “They may also react defensively and with hostility to even constructive criticism.”

Other signs? Look out for a manager who is highly competitive, tries to sabotage the careers of his competitors, or must win every disagreement. “A narcissistic boss may also shoot down other people’s work, or try to take credit for it himself,” adds Burgo.

Pick your battles

Perhaps an important presentation goes poorly. Or your team reports low numbers for the second consecutive month. You suspect the the problem can be traced to decisions your manager made. But how do you say so without offending?

“An unwritten part of your job description, like it or not, is to protect your boss’s ego,” says Burgo. “If you challenge him or her directly, you’ll only make yourself a target of his hostility.”

If your boss does become angry at you, it may be best to hold off on trying to reason with her until after she’s cooled down, says Burgo. Phrases like, “I didn’t mean it that way” or “I’m only trying to help” will worsen the situation. Stick with a brief, simple apology—even if you don’t think you have anything to be sorry for.

“An apology will diffuse the assault,” says Burgo. “This may sound like cowardly advice, but going up against a narcissistic boss is a losing proposition.”

Filter the feedback you get

When she’s critiquing you, listen. Just because someone is a narcissist doesn’t mean her observations can’t be legit. But if you decide her words are not intended to be constructive, try not to take them personally. It can be difficult not to internalize your manager’s negativity. But remember that her negativity is not really about you, says Burgo.

Still fuming hours later? It may help to vent your frustrations to a friend or family member. Research has found that this type of gossiping can actually be therapeutic, since it helps reduce stress and can moderate your heart rate.

If you’re tempted to talk to a colleague, don’t. Even if you think he or she can relate, it’s not worth the risk that the conversation will get back to your boss.

RELATED: Need to Spot a Narcissist? Just Ask Them

Know when it’s time to move on

“Successfully managing a narcissistic boss means having a very strong ego,” says Burgo. “So don’t let his or her attacks damage your own self-esteem.” That said, if you feel increasingly bad about yourself, have trouble sleeping, or dread going to work every day, it may be time to look for another job.

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Health and fitness with Alexa Towersey

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We chat to September cover model, Alexa Towersey about all things fitness, health, career and self-love. Check out the exclusive cover story interview below!

 

ON CAREER

I’ve been in the health and fitness industry for over 15 years. I’ve played pretty much every sport known to man including American football, boxing, soccer, skiing and horse-riding. I completed a Bachelor of Science in biology and psychology and went on to do a post-graduate diploma in sports management and kinesiology, and then I interned with an All Blacks-endorsed Pilates studio.

ON EXPERIENCES

When I was 27 I moved to Hong Kong, where I was the senior strength and conditioning coach at a mixed martial arts (MMA) gym. I decided to get into half-Ironman events and I took two years to qualify for the world champs. Living in Asia gave me the opportunity to travel and learn; I spent five years commuting between HK and the United States, learning from the legendary Gym Jones (the outfit responsible for training the cast and crew for the movies 300, The Immortals, Repo Men and Superman) and internationally recognised strength coach Charles Poliquin.

ON PASSION

When I was younger, I was bullied for being too skinny.  My nickname at school was Alexa Anorexia. I started going to the gym when I was 15 on a mission to create muscles and it was the first place I ever truly felt in control of my body and my mind. I want to be able to educate, empower and instil that passion in everyone I work with.

ON HEALTH

Both my parents passed away from lifestyle-related diseases – my mum from lung cancer and my dad from alcoholism.  This led to me giving up alcohol six years ago and is the reason I remain such a passionate advocate of living a healthy lifestyle.

ON DREAMS

For years, I was limited by own lack of self-belief. It wasn’t until I moved to Australia two years ago and immersed myself in a community of likeminded people that I really pushed myself out of my comfort zone. I truly believe that if you’re driven by passion and positivity rather than profit, then success is organic.  

ON BODY IMAGE

I think it’s a really exciting time to be in the industry as the landscape is definitely changing for the better. Women seem to be less focused on wanting to lose weight and be a size zero and more excited about getting stronger, feeling better in their own skin and wanting to develop shape.  

ON CREATING CURVES 

I love celebrating the strength of the female form. For me, as both a trainer and a female, there’s nothing more rewarding than seeing a woman become empowered in the gym and watching how this translates into the rest of her life. 

ON SELF-LOVE 

I have a very holistic approach with both myself and my clients. I’m a big advocate for learning to listen to your body and trusting your gut instincts. Your body is a very clever instrument and it will tell you in no uncertain terms what it likes and dislikes.

ON WHAT’S NEXT

I’m rolling out my Creating Curves workshops internationally, including Kuwait, the US and New Zealand. I’ve almost finished my second e-book program with Renae Ayris (former Miss Universe Australia). I’ve also recently started public speaking on behalf of the charity Livin, which is an organisation aimed at educating people about mental health issues and suicide prevention. I love being able to be involved in such an incredible and relevant cause. Twenty-sixteen is shaping up to be a huge year, so watch this space!

 

Alexatowersey.com // @actionalexa

Photography: Emily Abay // @emilyabay_photographer

Hair & Make-up Artist: Mae Taylor // @maetaylor_makeupartist

Dressed in: PE Nation // @p.e.nation courtesy of StyleRunner // @stylerunner

 

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Healthy living with blogger Lauren Patterson

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You may recognise her as having some of the funniest Instagram tales at ___@laurenkate with her two kids Madi and Max. We caught up with Lauren to chat about healthy living, pregnancy and life post-babies.

At the time of the interview Max was six months old and Madi was three and a half, whom which she attritubes her love of health and fitness and the overcoming of severe mental illness to her children. A personal trainer and blogger, her Instagram is your go-to for cute-as selfies with her babies and down-to-earth posts concerining the trials and tribulations of parenthood. 

 

On healthy living

Leading an active and healthy lifestyle helps to manage my anxiety and just makes me feel good. Before having my kids, I was suffering from severe mental illness and an eating disorder and I had no goals or hope for myself. Now I am spending every day working as hard as I can to give my kids the life they deserve.

On pregnancy

Your body does whatever it wants when you’re pregnant. It flattened my boobs, created lots of deep stretch marks, a saggy belly button and loose skin – but it’s all part of the process. I think of them as my little pregnancy battle scars and I love them! On the other hand, pregnancy never stopped me from being active and that made it so much easier to get back into a routine after having Max.

On post-baby bodies

After having Madi, I joined a gym and I slowly learnt to adjust to a new routine as a mum: I found myself using a couch like a piece of gym equipment and learning how to add herbs and spices to make a meal tasty.

It takes hard work and eating well to get your body back in shape after having kids – it’s by no means easy. Loving your post-baby body is all about acceptance and remembering what it has achieved – it created a human!

Day in the life of Patterson

I love to include the kids in my exercise regimen, so we tend to walk everywhere. I try to go to the gym in the mornings because it helps to boost my energy levels during the day. If I can’t get to the gym, Max will be my weights in the lounge room and I find myself doing a lot of glute kickbacks during the advertisement breaks on television.

I always start my day with breakfast: I like to have a protein shake and oats, fruit or wholegrain toast. Lunch is normally fish and rice with broccoli. I’m not overly strict with my clean eating practices and I believe in balance; if I feel like sauce with my dinner, I’m going to have sauce!

 

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6 Mistakes You're Making With Your Contacts

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Proper contact lens hygiene is nothing to roll your eyes at: A new government report warns that bad habits (like wearing your lenses to bed) can lead to eye infections and possibly permanent injuries. 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) examined more than 1,000 cases of contact lens-related infections reported to a federal database over the last decade, and found that nearly 1 in 5 of those infections resulted in eye damage—either a decline in vision, a scarred cornea, or the need for a corneal transplant. Yikes.

But the agency also found that by simply using your contacts the way you're supposed to, you can protect your peepers: About 25% of the reported cases involved behaviors known to put a person at greater risk of eye infection.

“Contact lenses are a safe and effective form of vision correction when worn and cared for as recommended,” said Michael Beach, PhD, director of the CDC’s Healthy Water Program, in a press release about the survey. “However, improper wear and care of contact lenses can cause eye infections that sometimes lead to serious, long-term damage.” 

Below, seven mistakes you might be making, and what to do instead.

RELATED: 5 Foods for Healthy Eyes

You sleep in your contacts

The enzymes and antibodies that protect the surface of your eyes require oxygen to fight off germs. When your eyes are closed at night, the air supply is reduced; wear your contacts to bed and there's even less oxygen available. The bottom line: When the PJs come on, the contacts should come out.

You handle your lenses with dirty fingers

To avoid transferring oil, dirt, and bacteria to your eyes (ew), clean your hands before you clean your contacts.

You're not rubbing your contacts

Even if you use a ‘no-rub’ contact solution, it's still a good idea: Give your lenses a rub in your (well-cleaned) palm to remove germs and protein buildup.

You don't change your solution daily

As Reena Garg, MD, an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the Icahn School of Medicine in New York City, told Health in a prior interview, "That's like doing your laundry in dirty water." According to the CDC, you should always use fresh multipurpose saline solution (never water!), and don't mix old saline solution with new in your contact case. In fact, you should empty the case after putting in your contacts, rinse it with fresh saline, dry it with a fresh, clean tissue and store it upside down on a clean tissue (with the lids off), until you are ready to use it again.

RELATED: 9 Worst Eye Care Mistakes You're Making

You shower and swim with your contacts in

The CDC advises keeping your lenses away from water (including pool water) to avoid a rare but potentially blinding infection caused by an amoeba called Acanthamoeba, as well as other types of infections. Bacteria and parasites in water can get caught under your lenses. If you're a swimmer, you may want to invest in prescription goggles. 

You leave your lenses in too long

When you're at home and on weekends, give your eyes a break and wear your glasses, says Berkeley, Michigan-based ophthalmologist Steven Shanbom, MD. In a prior interview with Health, he recommended that lens wearers keep their contacts in for no more than 12-14 hours a day.

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The Mental Tricks Laurie Hernandez Uses to Summon Crazy Confidence

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Team USA gymnast Laurie Hernandez is blowing us away in Rio: Her talent is obviously out of this world, but what’s just as impressive is the poise and confidence the 16-year-old first-time Olympian exhibits pretty much every time she’s on camera.

Take her performances so far. At the Olympic trials back in July, Hernandez calmly stood before a huge crowd, closed her eyes, put one hand on her stomach, and breathed deeply. Then she proceeded to kill it on beam. (She took first.)

This week, as she struck her starting pose for the floor exercise, she sent the judges a smile and sneaky wink. Later, before hopping up on the beam, the camera caught her whispering to herself, “I got this.” And she was right.

But these little pre-routine behaviors aren’t just a fun part of her personality, says sports psychology consultant Robert Andrews. They’re actually valuable tools for getting in the right mindset for optimal performance—and they’re easy enough for anyone to learn, elite athlete or not.

Breathing like a champ

Andrews, who has a master’s degree in psychology and a background in fitness, runs the Institute of Sports Performance in Houston. He’s worked with hundreds of professional athletes, including Hernandez and her teammate Simone Biles; in fact, he taught Hernandez that very breathing routine she practices before competition.

“I like to say that oxygen is the cure for stress and anxiety,” says Andrews. “A lot of athletes, when they’re stressed out, start breathing a lot shallower and faster. So learning how to monitor and be aware of breathing patterns under stress is important.”

What Hernandez is doing before she competes, he explains, is called diaphragmatic or “belly” breathing. “She’s moving her diaphragm down so that her lungs can open up,” he says. “Laurie, like a lot of people, tends to hold her stress in her stomach—so she’s connecting her mind to her stomach and her breathing patterns.”

Deep, diaphragmatic breathing can release tension in the body, says Andrews, which can also relax the mind. That changes hormonal function in the brain, and lowers the production of the stress hormone cortisol.

RELATED: How 6 Olympic Athletes Deal With the Pressure

Acting confident goes a long way

Andrews also works with athletes on body language and posture, which he says can have a big psychological influence on performance. “Laurie has a very upright, straight posture when she’s getting ready for a routine,” he points out. Not only does that make an impression on the judges, he says, it can also make an impression on her own brain.

“Strong body language like that can actually increase the production of testosterone and lower the production of stress-related hormones,” he says. “It creates brain chemistry that increases assertiveness and confidence, which you need just the right amount of when you’re on the bars, the beam, the floor, wherever.”

The same goes for Laurie’s now-famous “I-got-this” pep talk. Andrews didn’t teach her those words exactly, but he says he has talked with her about the power of positive thinking.

“Where you point your mind, your body follows—so Laurie has figured out that those words are very empowering for her mind and body, and they’re going to help her bring out that fierceness that she needs,” he says. “I can’t think of a better powerful, affirmative statement of belief in herself.”

RELATED: What 5 Olympic Athletes Can Teach You About Body Confidence

You can use belly breathing too—and not just for sports

Anyone can benefit from diaphragmatic breathing before a stressful event, says Andrews—from an age-group runner competing in a race to a teenager taking an exam. The practice can help in the corporate world, too, with everything from job interviews to sales pitches to public speaking. 

“I’ve had high school and college students who report back to me that they’re making better grades on tests and giving better presentations in front of the class because they’re using these mindfulness techniques,” says Andrews. “Athletes call it their peak performance zone, but really everyone works better when they’re in a mindful, centered state.”

Ready to give it a try? Here’s what to do next time you’re in a stressful situation and feeling nervous. (If you’re not in one right now, just picture yourself there.)

Close your eyes and sit or stand up straight.
Find the spot in your body where your stress is building up. Is it in your throat? Your chest? Your stomach? Focus on that spot.
Inhale deeply, so that your stomach expands out and not up. It can help to put your hand on your stomach to feel this movement happening.
Concentrate on slowly breathing in and out, and feel your stress levels come down.

Andrews works with athletes on bringing those emotions down to the appropriate level. If 1 means no stress at all and 10 means all-out freak out, some people might perform best at a 5, others at a 3, he says. The key is to learn what works best for you.

And while Andrews says that the mental aspect of competition is especially important in Olympic sports—where a hundredth of a point or a literal split second can determine the winners—he agrees that it’s also a big part of successful performances of any type, at any level.

So next time you’re feeling unsure of yourself, try giving yourself a little mental boost a la Laurie Hernandez. Close your eyes, focus on your breath, and maybe even give a little wink. Because guess what? You’ve got this.

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