Workout Music 

Love Me Harder (153 BPM Workout Remix)

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Fat Loss 

Instagram photo by Jimmy Smith • Jul 18, 2016 at 11:33am UTC

Women and #cardio Women burn more fat during exercise and use more glucose at rest than men who burn more glucose during activity but burn more fat at rest. This is another reasons why women burn less glycogen during training and can recover faster than men. Most male coaches just give their female clients less overall food and dont acknowledge the fat that women burn more fat during exercise but need carbohydrate as rest to recover. An additional study points to how women burn fat during exercise programs. Aerobically while…

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Fat Loss 

Women burn more fat during exercise and use more glucose at rest than men who bu…

Women burn more fat during exercise and use more glucose at rest than men who burn more glucose during activity but burn more fat at rest. This is another reasons why women burn less glycogen during training and can recover faster than men. Most male coaches just give their female clients less overall food and dont acknowledge the fat that women burn more fat during exercise but need carbohydrate as rest to recover. An additional study points to how women burn fat during exercise programs. Aerobically while women are superior…

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Workout Music 

Love me Harder (Remix by Boris Mills 128 bpm)

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Strong Abs Start With This 7-Minute Workout

www.popsugar.com/fitness/7-Minute-HIIT-Workout-30492060

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Get the printable version of this seven-minute HIIT workout here!

When it comes to high-intensity interval training (HIIT), the pros definitely outweigh the cons. While it may feel unpleasant to push your body to go faster and harder for that short time period, the rewards are worth it: HIIT helps you blast more belly fat, save time, and burn way more calories (even after your workout is long over) than a lower-intensity workout alone. A study published in the American College of Sports Medicine’s Health and Fitness Journal found that a few minutes of training at almost your max can accomplish all of this in way less time than a traditional workout. How much less? Try just seven minutes total.

The ACSM’s interval workout consists of 12 exercises, which should be done at an intensity of eight on a scale of 10; each exercise lasts 30 seconds, with a 10-second rest in between. Repeat the circuit if you’d like a longer workout. Keeping the intensity up — and the rest periods short — is key, so keep reading to learn the moves and then get going! You’ll need a mat and a chair or bench.

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Uncategorized 

Lack of Sleep Could Be Doing This to Your Heart

www.popsugar.com/fitness/How-Lack-Sleep-Affects-Your-Body-Heart-42871144

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We’ve all pulled the occasional all-nighter without a second-thought about what might happen to our bodies in the process. Our friends at Shape Magazine share their findings about lack of sleep’s health consequences.

What do new moms, college students, paramedics, and ER docs all have in common (besides having to deal with puke on a regular basis)? They all routinely need to make it through the day on no or very little sleep. And while no one thinks pulling an all-nighter is good for your health, there’s actual evidence that it hurts your heart.

Getting less than three hours of sleep during a 24-hour period causes immediate heart problems, according to a new study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. Researchers looked at 20 healthy adults, testing their hearts before and after they worked a 24-hour shift during which they weren’t allowed to drink coffee, take caffeine, or eat anything that might have a stimulant effect, including nuts and chocolate (possibly the hardest 24 hours ever). After missing just one night of sleep, people’s hearts showed signs of increased strain, they had increased blood pressure, and their heart rates were elevated — all warning signs of cardiovascular problems. The researchers also found increased levels of thyroid hormones and cortisol, indicating high levels of stress, another known contributor to heart disease.

The results clearly showed that working when you should be sleeping takes a short-term toll on your heart, said study author Daniel Kuetting, M.D., of the Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology at the University of Bonn in a press release. But, he added, more research needs to be done to see how long the negative effects last and how much sleep it takes to return to normal. It makes sense, however, that repeatedly skipping sleep would set you up for ongoing health problems, especially when done the way most people do it in the real world — with gallons of coffee, diet soda, or other stimulants, which make the heart work even harder.

Bottom line? When in doubt, sleep it out. And if your job (or kid) requires you to be up all night, try to do it as infrequently as possible and make sure you’re doing other things to keep your ticker in top shape, like exercising and eating a heart-healthy diet. (Try these Top 20 Best Foods For Your Heart!)

More from our friends at Shape Magazine:

15 Toppings and Ingredients That Boost Your Smoothie Bowl
Pulling Just 1 All-Nighter Might Have Some Serious Health Consequences
Workleisure: Activewear You Can Actually Wear to the Office

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9 Things to Cut Out in 2017 to Be Healthy

www.popsugar.com/fitness/Healthy-New-Year-Resolution-Tips-42870719

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It’s time for New Year’s resolutions, and we know many of you are planning on cutting back on the unhealthy things in your life. But that doesn’t always mean junk food or sweets — we’ve got some habits that might be holding you back from your healthy goals that you should definitely consider eliminating this year.

Here’s what we’re cutting out in 2017 to have our healthiest year yet.

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Negative self-talk: Stop being mean to yourself. Just stop. You are enough! You ARE strong! You’re capable. Start giving yourself more compliments, and make this year about no negative self-talk — ever. The more you berate and degrade yourself, the harder your year will be; you’ll also have a much harder time reaching your healthy goals.

Your scale: Look, quantifiable goals are great, but the scale can be an evil enemy, and doctors agree! If you’ve been obsessed with the scale and every decimal point on your weight, it’s time for that thing to go. In the trash. Forever. Remember that a number on a scale doesn’t reflect the hard work you’re putting in, and the numbers absolutely do not define you.

Workouts you hate: Not everyone likes running, and that’s OK. Forcing yourself into a workout that you hate definitely won’t encourage you to keep working out. There are alternatives to running — and so many other kinds of cardio exercises. If you hate bootcamp classes, try barre. Hate barre? Stop doing it! Try yoga. If something’s not working, try a new studio or new instructor. Keep going until you find something that clicks, but absolutely do not keep going to a class or attempting a workout you don’t like.

Exercising to “fix” or change a part of your body: Working out because you “hate” your body is the worst thing you can do. Exercise makes you feel good — it celebrates your body, makes you feel empowered, and sends a rush of feel-good endorphins through your body. Working out will boost your energy, improve your health, and can change your mood for the better, alongside so many other benefits. Celebrate your body, don’t try to “fix” it.

Kale (or that one food you just can’t stand): A lot of you hate kale. So stop forcing it! You don’t need kale to be healthy! Maybe it’s not kale, but it’s another healthy food you’ve been forcing yourself to eat under the pretense that it’s healthy and you “need it” to be healthy yourself. This just isn’t true, and if your diet consists of things you don’t love, you’re not going to stay on that diet for very long. For a more sustainable diet, experiment more with other healthy foods to find out what you do love. You’ll be eating healthier all the time!

Perfectionism: Striving for a goal is great; striving for perfection is unhealthy. Giving yourself unrealistic or unattainable goals is detrimental to your mental and your physical health. That desire for perfectionism can often be a defense mechanism, when you’re either consciously or subconsciously protecting yourself from the judgment of others. Focus that energy on progress, not perfection, and you’ll have a much better year.

Calorie counting: This year, stop obsessing over calories — especially if it has created a negative relationship with food. Food is fuel, and we need calories to have strong muscles, bones, and a functioning body! There are so many ways to track your food and eat healthy without calorie counting. If you need the data and numbers to stay in control of your healthy eating, try looking into counting macros — you’ll have a healthy balance of protein, fats, and carbohydrates each day.

Stress: Whether you have clinical anxiety or you’ve been stressing way too much in 2016, your compromised mental health can have a seriously negative impact on your health. Stress can cause weight gain, bloating, physical pain, skin problems, and more. Quite a setback for your healthiest year yet, right? To relax and cut out stress in 2017, get yourself a great therapist, or try a self-care practice like diffusing essential oils.

Everything that is holding you back: What is keeping you from being your best self and living your best life? Is it an unhealthy relationship, a terrible job that drains you of your energy, or a deep-seated fear? Let. It. Go. Cut the people out who don’t support you. Say goodbye to work that doesn’t make you feel good — or worse, makes you feel bad. Remove unnecessary obligations that keep you from reaching your physical, mental, and personal goals. This is YOUR time! Replace these things with activities that help you reach your goals, a job that fosters your creativity and empowers you, and relationships with people who build you up.

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Why The Biggest Loser Contestants Gain Back the Weight

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It’s an unfortunate truth that many people who lose a significant amount of weight will gain it back. But a new study of contestants of the popular reality show The Biggest Loser suggests that a slowed metabolism—not a lack of willpower—is largely to blame.

In new research to be published in the journal Obesity, researchers followed contestants from The Biggest Loser season 8 for six years to see what happened to them after they lost so much weight, the New York Times reports. Led by Kevin Hall, a scientist at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the researchers found that people’s resting metabolism—how many calories they burn when they’re at rest—changes dramatically after weight loss.

The men and women had normal metabolisms for their weight when they were obese, the Times reports. However, once they dropped a massive amount of weight, their resting metabolisms slowed so significantly that they were not burning enough calories to maintain their new size. This is a normal reaction to weight loss; what was surprising was that as time passed and the people gained back weight, their metabolisms continued to slow, making the process harder.

The winner of season 8, Danny Cahill, lost nearly 240 pounds in less than a year. Since then, he’s gained back 100 pounds, the Times reports. But the findings may also apply to people who lose less.

The new study adds to a growing body of research aimed at understanding why it’s so difficult for people to lose weight, and why some are more successful than others. Other recent studies have suggested that people’s bodies respond dramatically differently to the same foods. In the future, weight loss advice may need to be more personalized, some experts suggest.

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

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5 Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me Before I Started Running

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When I first got into running, I experienced everything from painful blisters to chafing to unsupported bosoms — no wonder I hated it. I wish someone had sat me down and told me these basic tips and tricks to help smooth my transition from nonrunner to runner. If you’re just starting out on your own journey pounding the pavement or treadmill belt, here are things you should know about running.

It Gets Easier

As with most things, the more you do it, the easier it becomes. To strengthen your muscles, acclimate your heart and lungs, and increase your endurance, run at least three times a week. Start off with a doable distance such as two miles. Once that distance feels good, gradually increase your mileage. The key is to move at a comfortable pace for a reasonable amount of time. If you do too much too soon, you could end up with an injury or a deep hatred for the sport.

You Don’t Have to Wear Two Sports Bras

If you’re well-endowed, running can be painful. I wore two sports bras for the longest time because I couldn’t find one that prevented the uncomfortable bounce. A cheap cotton sports bra from Target just won’t do. You might have to spend $50 or more, but it’s worth it when you only have to wear one bra you trust.

Don’t Skimp on Gear

For my first run, I picked up a $25 pair of sneaks and a pack of cheap cotton socks and wondered why I had screaming blisters. You don’t need a ton of gear, but what you do need, you shouldn’t skimp on. Spring for a trusty pair of well-fitting sneaks ($60-$120), a good pair of wicking socks ($10-$15), a super supportive sports bra ($30-$70), a seamless tank and long-sleeve to prevent chafing ($20-$40), and a lightweight pair of running shorts or tights to avoid wedgies ($20-$40). Technical gear specifically designed for running makes a huge difference and could make or break your new running career.

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There Are Apps to Chart Your Run

I often drove running routes in my car to figure out mileage until my hubby introduced me to the wonderful world of iPhone running apps. The GPS not only keeps track of your distance, but it’ll also chart your workout time, pace, calories burned, and elevation and give you a map of your run. Being able to track your workout might motivate you to keep going so you can beat your personal records.

Running Outside Is Harder Than the Treadmill

My power was out one morning — meaning no treadmill time for me — so I decided to run outside instead. It was so much harder! The real hills, the uneven terrain, the wind, the sun, the heat — it all makes running tougher than it already is. But I’ll tell you, once I started running outside, I saw a huge improvement in my strength and endurance. I even lost the five extra pounds I could never quite shake, and my muscle definition was noticeable to others (“Damn, look at your calves!”). I know people are in love with their treadmills, but I wish someone suggested I run outside because the difficulty made me a better runner.

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18 Nutrition and Fitness Experts Reveal Their New Year's Resolutions

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Eat better, join a gym, drink more water, get eight hours of sleep every night…many of the most popular New Year's resolutions are focused on living a healthier, more balanced life. But what do those people who are already extremely healthy (in fact, it's their job to be) want to improve upon? We polled 18 wellness influencers, from nutritionists to celebrity trainers to healthy start-up founders, to find out what their self-improvement goals are for the upcoming year. From being more mindful to carving out time for themselves to working out a little less (if only we all had that problem), here are their resolutions for 2017.

RELATED: 21 New Year's Resolutions You'll Actually Keep

Embrace mindfulness and live in the now

"Be even more mindful with the words I use, making sure they are influential in a positive, hopeful, and inspiring way; not just for the clients I train, but for everyone I interact with, including myself." 
—Tanya Becker, co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of Physique57

"Furthering my meditation practice. I find that mindfulness not only allows me to react more calmly in stressful situations, but it also helps me feel happier overall and more in the moment, whether I’m eating, being active, or spending time with my hubby and pets."
Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, Health's contributing nutrition editor

"I resolve to listen closer, breathe deeper, and be more present. I hope to think less and risk more. And while focusing on all these things, I hope to empower others to do the same. I'm very excited for 2017!"
—Olivia Young, founder of box + flow

"My New Year's resolution is to commit—to be more instinctual and trust my gut. To work harder, and to live in the now."
—Derek DeGrazio, celebrity trainer and managing partner at Barry's Bootcamp Miami

RELATED: 13 New Year's Resolutions You Shouldn't Make

Pay it forward

"My New Year's resolution is to advocate on more result-oriented ways and less social ways to educate and support people's lives. This is an important year in health and I feel a strong commitment to providing people tools that help them invest in their health and their futures. I feel that the trends in fitness will be taking a backseat to people wanting life-long solutions that pay it forward in a really meaningful way."
—Tracy Anderson, Health contributing fitness editor, celebrity fitness trainer, and founder of the Tracy Anderson Method

"To do a random act of kindness every day. [It] forces you to think about how you can be more compassionate all day, so you can realize the perfect moment to act on it."
—Danielle DuBoise, co-founder of SAKARA LIFE

Carve out more personal time

"I want to make sure to spend more quality time with my closest friends and call my mom and sister more often. I’m going to work on improving my cooking skills. Professionally, I’m going to hire an assistant. And physically, I’m going to take more rest days. I’m on my feet working six out of seven days a week. I’d like to change that to five days a week." 
—Lacey Stone, celebrity trainer and founder of Lacey Stone Fitness

"Put more 'me' time on the calendar. It can be difficult to manage the work/life balance when you own a business because you're emotionally invested. This year, I'm going to make more of an effort to put the computer away and take time for myself."
—Tracy Carlinsky, founder of Brooklyn Bodyburn

"I am so busy and pulled in so many directions—single parent to twin girls, business owner—I don't take enough time to decompress. I know doing so will make me more grounded, balanced, and ultimately more productive."
—David Kirsch, celebrity fitness and wellness expert

RELATED: 28 New Year's Resolutions to Look and Feel Better

Schedule in restorative workouts

"Take it down a notch! As a fitness pro, I often push myself as hard as possible in every. single. workout, choosing the most advanced poses or sequences. Movement is my 'drug of choice' and I'm working on sometimes allowing that movement to be peaceful or restorative rather than only the most intense."
—Amy Jordan, founder and CEO of WundaBar Pilates

"Being an athletespecifically a boxer and a runnermy body is always tight, and I often don't take much time to stretch and recover, as I'm in a go-go-go mentality. I want to try out new yoga classes a few times a week and get into my own stretching routine so I can feel better doing what I love."
—Ashley Guarrasi, founding trainer of Rumble Boxing

Stress less

"Learn to only focus on controlling the things I can control. Too often we stress about things we really can't control, and it just makes us put unnecessary worry and pressure on ourselves."
—Skylar Diggins, Dallas Wings guard 

Fuel up the right way

"Be more mindful of how I'm fueling my body. Being 38 years old, it's getting harder to bounce back from eating badly consecutive days in a row. My goal is to incorporate a more Paleo-based way of eating, with lots of chicken and fish!"
—Alonzo Wilson, founder of Tone House

"Most resolutions focus on things to cut out. Here's what I plan to add more of in 2017: more colorful veggies on half of my plate, more outdoor workouts, and more books (for fun!)."
—Erika Horowitz MS, RDN

"I like to set my New Year's resolution to be realistic and achievable, so my nutrition plan is based on the 80/20 rule: stick to the Ketogenic diet six days a week, and one day a week splurge with my cheat food of choice (rhymes with "rasta")."
—Ross Franklin, CEO and founder of PureGreen Cold Pressed Juice

RELATED: 57 Ways to Lose Weight Forever, According to Science

Take a risk and try new things

"Trying new sports and workout classes. I want to break out of my comfort zone a bit more! I've never been rock climbing or snow skiing, so I'd like to try those. I would also like to make more of an effort to prioritize recovery. I work out hard and throw around some pretty heavy weights. Somewhere along the line I've started to skimp on stretching, foam rolling, and resting. Not okay!"
—Melody Scharff, instructor at the Fhitting Room

"I'm going to find a better balance between my strength training, mobility, and Jiu Jitsu. I tend to hyper focus on one type of training and my body needs the variety to perform and feel optimal. I'm committed to sitting down before the new year and re-structuring my schedule to reach my goals. If you don't plan, it won't happen!"
—Ashley Borden, celebrity fitness trainer

"Although I work out (and I'm lucky to LOVE working out), my exercise was all over the place in 2016 and I want to take it up a notch in 2017. This includes getting in a few races, planning a few hiking trips, and being consistent with four intense workouts a week."
—Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, and founder of Nutritious Life and the Nutrition School

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