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This Was the Top-Searched Diet of 2016 (and Chances Are You've Never Heard of It)

http://www.popsugar.com/fitness/What-GOLO-Diet-42858470

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Have you heard of the GOLO diet? To be frank — none of us at POPSUGAR Fitness had heard this term until Google shared their top diet searches for 2016 . . . and “GOLO Diet” was at the top of said list. We had a collective “wait, what?” moment, before frantically researching to see what this was about.

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First stop: find the experts (aka, chat with our dietitian friends). They must know something about it, right? Well, RD and MPH Lisa Eberly had “No idea . . . I work with 70 RDs who chit chat all day long about new diets and research, and I’ve never heard it come up.” Interesting. We found that “insulin resistance” was a term that came up often with “GOLO diet,” so we asked Lori Zanini, RD and certified diabetes expert. “Honestly, I have never heard of it until right now . . . I have never had any clients that have tried it.” Lori also mentioned she was with another RD when we called her, who had also never heard of the GOLO diet. WHAT IS GOING ON?

So we opted for our own internet research. We were off to a suspicious start, but wanted to give this the benefit of the doubt. Maybe it’s really helping people! After all, enough people searched this diet to make it the #1 search on Google in 2016 . . .

Here’s what we know:

What Is the GOLO Diet?

According to GOLO.com, a “scientific breakthrough reveals the real cause of weight loss and how to reverse it.” Sounds promising! The cause in question? Insulin, said Jen Books, GOLO’s VP of marketing. “GOLO was developed by a team of doctors and pharmacists over the course of five years,” Brooks told POPSUGAR, via email. “Their research led them to develop a natural solution for weight gain based on managing insulin, the main hormone that controls weight loss, weight gain, metabolism.”

Brief overview: no counting calories, just managing insulin. They say this is the key to sustainable weight loss and maintenance.

The diet was created by psychiatrist Dr. Keith Ablow — who has a specialty in anxiety and depression — and a team of (unnamed) doctors and pharmacists, according to the website. The site describes the diet as a “natural, healthy solution that specifically targets weight gain.” Dr. Albow is a New York Times best-selling author, so that offers some promise as to the legitimacy of the program.

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But . . . what is it? From what we’ve gathered, it’s a diet intended to optimize your insulin levels — the program is entirely rooted in insulin regulation as a means of weight loss. You start a “30 Day Rescue Plan” for $39.95, which includes literature and a GOLO supplement intended to kickstart your program for “adopting the GOLO lifestyle.”

How Does it Work?

Here’s how they describe it: “GOLO works to optimize your body’s insulin levels, keeping them steady all day so you burn fat, maintain energy, and eliminate the crashes that cause hunger and cravings.” The site also reports an average weight loss of 48.6 pounds in a year. So is it a matter of just monitoring your blood sugar levels and eating foods that have a low glycemic index?

“Its effects almost entirely depend on your genetics — So if you don’t know your DNA it’s a crap shoot.”

There are three “tiers” to the program: “Intervention” (plant-based supplements), Meal Plan (“Metabolic Fuel Matrix”), and “GOLO For Life (Roadmap).”

The plant-based supplements contain magnesium oxide, zinc oxide, chromium, and a proprietary blend of roots and fruit extracts. GOLO’s site calls it “a weight-loss supplement that actually works.” Could the promise of a “diet pill” actually be real? It’s hard for us to tell. Consumerscompare.org noted that they also have not been able to find customers outside of company-controlled websites to ask. Brooks told us that the “Release” supplement helps to “optimize insulin performance” and “provide metabolic support.”

Our registered dietitian Lisa saw the ingredients list and told us “it’s like a low-key laxative.” She noted that this is effective for those with diabetes, or prediabetes. “Magnesium can have effects on insulin resistance, but only in people who actually have prediabetes or diabetes. The only major effects in people with healthy insulin are diarrhea and potentially a calming and relaxing effect. It can lower blood pressure in certain circumstances, too. Its effects almost entirely depend on your genetics — So if you don’t know your DNA it’s a crap shoot.”

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As for the meal plan, the site guarantees results, saying “You will see amazing results in the first seven days and realize that there is a smarter, healthier solution.” It’s described as “the right combination of proteins, carbohydrates, vegetables, and fat to promote weight loss.” We haven’t seen any recipes to verify this, but from from what we’ve seen on Pinterest, they seem to be in line with the low-glycemic index diets — something that Harvard has actually verified as an effective way to lose weight. The site itself refers to the recipes as simple, with insulin-friendly foods. “Meals are based on our patented Fuel index which measures the metabolic effect of food so they are balanced to have the exact amount of protein, fat, carbohydrates that maximize energy without spiking insulin or storing fat,” said Brooks.

The “Roadmap” is a “FREE membership” to myGOLO. GOLO guarantees that “Whether you need motivation to get fit, guidance on changing eating habits, want to take charge of your health, or need to reduce stress or overcome emotional eating, we give you the tools to help you reach your goals.”

In Sum

A diet that says you can eat bread, pasta, and butter — with no calorie counting — and a pill that boosts weight loss sounds very enticing. Especially one that was created by a doctor, that guarantees results within the first seven days.

The thing is, we just can’t find anyone who has tried this — or even knows what it is. We found a few YouTube user reviews on their personal success with the program, yet still, we can’t find enough substantial information outside the company’s own website to give you the real go-ahead.

If you’ve got an extra 40 bucks a month to experiment, it doesn’t seem like there are any adverse side-effects to this program.

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Sugary Drinks and 'Bad' Carbs May Increase Risk of These Types of Cancer

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By Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) — People who consume a lot of processed carbohydrates—think snack foods and sweets—and sugary drinks may face heightened risks of breast and prostate cancers, a new study suggests.

Researchers said the study, reported Tuesday at the American Society for Nutrition annual meeting in San Diego, does not prove that “bad” carbs cause cancer.

But given that breast and prostate cancers are two of the most common cancers in the United States, the connection gives more reason for people to cut processed foods from their diets, said lead researcher Nour Makarem.

“The carbohydrate quality of your diet matters for a number of reasons,” said Makarem, a Ph.D. candidate in nutrition at New York University.

In general, health experts already recommend limiting sugary drinks and processed carbohydrates, and eating more fruits, vegetables, legumes, fiber-rich whole grains, and “good” unsaturated fats.

So the new findings—considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal—add more weight to that advice, Makarem said.

She pointed, in particular, to the link her team found between sugar-sweetened drinks (both soda and fruit juice) and prostate cancer risk. Compared with men who never drank sugary beverages, those who had them a few times a week showed more than triple the risk of developing prostate cancer.

And that was with other factors—including obesity, smoking, and other diet habits—taken into account, Makarem said.

Still, it is difficult to weed out the effects of particular diet habits on cancer risk, said Marji McCullough, strategic director of nutritional epidemiology for the American Cancer Society.

“Few dietary factors apart from alcohol and/or obesity have been consistently related to postmenopausal breast cancer and prostate cancer,” McCullough said.

The question of whether carbohydrate quality affects cancer risk—independent of obesity—is important, according to McCullough. But it’s also a “challenging” one to answer, she said.

The new findings are based on nearly 3,200 U.S. adults whose diet habits and cancer rates were tracked for more than 20 years. During that time, 565 people were diagnosed with cancer.

At first glance, higher carb intake was tied to a lower risk of breast cancer. But the picture changed when carb quality was considered, Makarem noted.

She said that women whose diets emphasized healthy carbs—vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and legumes—were 67 percent less likely to develop breast cancer, compared to women who favored refined carbs. Refined carbs include many baked goods, white bread and white potatoes.

When it came to prostate cancer risk, men who regularly drank sugary juices or soda were more than three times as likely to develop disease versus men who steered clear of those drinks, the findings showed.

That does not prove sweet drinks directly contribute to prostate cancer, Makarem acknowledged. Still, she said, many studies have implicated the beverages in the risks of obesity and type 2 diabetes—so there are other reasons to cut back.

“Plus,” Makarem said, “it’s an easy change to make in your diet.”

The American Beverage Association took issue with the findings.

“The authors of this study abstract acknowledge their findings do not show that beverages cause any disease,” the group said in a statement. “Moreover, the study was limited to one demographic group that is not reflective of the population of the United States.” (Most study participants were white.)

The beverage association also said that the American Cancer Society cites multiple potential risk factors for breast, prostate and colon cancer, so singling out diet is difficult. The group also said that because the study hasn’t been published in a peer-reviewed journal, “very few study details are available” and it’s therefore tough to draw firm conclusions.

Sugary drinks weren’t the only diet factor that mattered, though, according to the researchers. Prostate cancer risk was also heightened among men whose diets were generally high in “glycemic load”—which, Makarem said, basically means they ate a lot of refined carbs.

The study also implicated “processed lunch foods,” including pizza, deli meats, and burgers. Men who ate those foods four or more times a week were twice as likely to develop prostate cancer, compared to men who had them no more than once a week, the researchers found.

According to McCullough, it’s hard to know whether certain foods, per se, contribute to breast or prostate cancers—or whether, for example, it’s overall calorie intake and weight gain that are the true culprits.

But the bottom line, Makarem said, is that whole, “high-quality” foods are a generally healthier choice than processed ones.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more on diet and cancer risk.


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50+ Lunch Recipes That Help With Weight Loss (and Are Under 500 Calories!)

http://www.popsugar.com/fitness/Best-Lunch-Recipes-Weight-Loss-39281763

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You’re trying to lose weight, so you pack a salad for lunch. But by 2 p.m., you’re famished! In order for a lunch to be filling and help you lose weight, experts say to eat between 20 and 30 grams of protein and at least eight grams of fiber. These under-500-calorie lunches are perfect!

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13 Things You Need to Know About the Zika Virus

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By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

What is Zika?

Zika is a virus first discovered in 1947 and named after the Zika forest in Uganda. The first human cases of Zika were detected in 1952, but until last year there had been only isolated outbreaks occurring mainly in tropical locales.

How is it transmitted?

Zika is spread primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus mosquito. Mosquitoes become infected by drinking the blood of a person infected with Zika, and then spread the disease to other people.

A man infected with Zika can transmit the virus through sexual intercourse. Also, people can be infected if they are given a blood transfusion tainted with Zika.

Who faces the greatest health risk from Zika?

Four out of five people infected with Zika do not develop any symptoms. Those who do most often suffer from mild symptoms that include fever, rash, joint pain, or red eyes.

The true risk of Zika is to a developing fetus. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed that Zika can cause terrible birth defects if a pregnant woman is infected with the virus.

What kind of birth defects does Zika cause?

Microcephaly is the most common birth defect caused by Zika, and it involves abnormally small development of the head and brain. Zika also causes other brain-related birth defects, and can result in miscarriage, according to the CDC.

What are the chances Zika exposure during pregnancy will cause microcephaly?

Not every fetus exposed to Zika develops a birth defect. Women infected with Zika have given birth to apparently healthy babies, although health experts can’t guarantee that these babies won’t develop problems later in life. No one knows what the odds are that a birth defect will occur. This is one of the CDC’s ongoing areas of research.

What can a woman who’s pregnant or trying to get pregnant do to protect herself?

Women of child-bearing age who live in an active Zika region should protect themselves from mosquito bites by wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants, using mosquito repellent when outside, and staying indoors as much as possible.

Women should use condoms or refrain from sex with a male partner if they are living in an active Zika area. They also should follow these precautions for at least 8 weeks if the man has traveled to an active Zika area, or for at least 6 months if the man has been diagnosed with Zika.

What can be done if a pregnant woman is infected with Zika?

There is no cure or vaccine for Zika. Pregnant women infected with Zika will be monitored by doctors, who will closely track fetal development.

Will a Zika infection threaten all future pregnancies?

The CDC has said there’s no evidence that a past Zika virus infection will endanger future pregnancies. It appears that once the virus has been cleared from a person’s bloodstream, it poses no risk to any subsequent pregnancies.

What other illnesses can Zika cause?

Zika has been associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a rare disease of the nervous system in which a person’s immune system attacks nerve cells. The disease causes muscle weakness and, less frequently, paralysis. Most people recover fully, but some have permanent damage and about one in 20 die.

CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden has said it is very likely that Zika causes GBS, given that the syndrome also is triggered by a number of different bacterial or viral infections. However, the link has not been confirmed. The CDC is investigating.

Where in the U.S. is Zika likely to become active?

Zika already is active in the territory of Puerto Rico, where one death has been reported, as well as American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Public health officials expect Zika to strike first in the continental United States in Florida, Louisiana or Texas, once the mosquito season gets underway. The A. aegypti mosquito can range as far north as San Francisco, Kansas City and New York City, although health officials have said infections that far north are unlikely.

What can I do to reduce the risk of Zika becoming active in my neighborhood?

People can help reduce their area’s risk by eliminating mosquito habitats from their property. Get rid of any source of standing water, such as buckets, plastic covers, toys or old tires. Empty and change the water in bird baths, fountains, wading pools and potted plants once a week. Drain or fill with dirt any temporary pools of water, and keep swimming pool water treated and circulating, according to the CDC.

Report any mosquito activity in your neighborhood to your local mosquito control program.

What should I do if I think I’ve been exposed to Zika?

The CDC recommends that people contact their health care provider if they are suffering from Zika-like symptoms, particularly if they are pregnant. Tests are available that can confirm Zika infection.

Is there a vaccine for Zika?

No, but the CDC is working with pharmaceutical companies to ramp up research into a vaccine for the virus.


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Most Americans Think Burgers Are Healthy

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A new survey reveals that 82% of Americans who eat hamburgers think that the sandwich is a good source of nutrients.

Researchers with the market research group Mintel polled 1,767 Americans who had ordered a burger from a restaurant in the last three months. 62% of the people said they love burgers—and the numbers were strong even among Millennials, the generation most likely to say that menu healthiness is important to them when they choose a restaurant. Americans’ obsession with burgers isn’t surprising, but the sandwich’s perceived healthiness is, given the fact that the World Health Organization (WHO) recently announced that processed meat is a carcinogen and red meat likely causes cancer.

While burgers are good sources of protein, iron and vitamin B12, they come with a lot of problems, according to nutrition experts—particularly the fatty meat, sugary ketchup and refined grain buns.

The new survey did find that even burger lovers know they could choose a healthier sandwich. People want more chicken and turkey burgers, the survey found, which are considered healthier options.

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

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How to Eat If You're Trying to Lose Weight, According to a Dietitian

http://www.popsugar.com/fitness/Should-I-Eat-Certain-Times-Lose-Weight-40845844

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Like most people trying to lose weight, I listened to the experts. Instead of eating breakfast, lunch, and dinner, I started scheduling meals and snacks so I was eating five or six times a day. This worked out to noshing on something every couple hours — 7 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. snack, 12 p.m. lunch, 3 p.m. snack, 5:30 p.m. dinner, and sometimes a late-night snack. The purpose was to ensure my hunger was satiated to prevent feeling so famished at each meal that I’d overeat. But then I realized I was eating all day long and never feeling hungry. I was also not losing weight. I was watching the clock instead of listening to my body. So which is better?

When I asked certified dietitian Leslie Langevin, MS, RD, CD of Whole Health Nutrition to answer that question, she said, “It’s better to eat when you are hungry. This is the concept of mindful eating.” Every time you go to put something in your mouth, ask yourself if you are hungry.

She also adds that it’s important to know what hunger is, since feeling hungry is important for weight loss. “Some people have stomach growling, some have salivation and increased food thought.” Being aware of the hunger scale will help you decide when it’s time to eat. You want to eat when you’re at about a three on the hunger scale, feeling hungry with a growling belly. And the important thing here is to eat enough until you’re at about a six on the hunger scale, where you feel satisfied but not stuffed or tired from eating too much.

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Eating when you’re hungry and eating just enough to feel satiated is the key. So instead of watching the clock and eating exactly at certain times of the day, eat when your body tells you it’s ready to eat. That might mean eating three times a day, and that might mean eating six times a day.

Leslie does say that, “I think if you are a person who is a meal skipper or someone who doesn’t really feel that hungry, setting times is a good idea.” Some people forget to eat because they’re so busy, or their work schedule only allows them to take breaks at certain times, so for these instances, it’s important to schedule snacks and meals. But overall, if you’re schedule allows for it, “go for the hunger/mindful eating approach.”

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Why The Biggest Loser Contestants Gain Back the Weight

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It’s an unfortunate truth that many people who lose a significant amount of weight will gain it back. But a new study of contestants of the popular reality show The Biggest Loser suggests that a slowed metabolism—not a lack of willpower—is largely to blame.

In new research to be published in the journal Obesity, researchers followed contestants from The Biggest Loser season 8 for six years to see what happened to them after they lost so much weight, the New York Times reports. Led by Kevin Hall, a scientist at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the researchers found that people’s resting metabolism—how many calories they burn when they’re at rest—changes dramatically after weight loss.

The men and women had normal metabolisms for their weight when they were obese, the Times reports. However, once they dropped a massive amount of weight, their resting metabolisms slowed so significantly that they were not burning enough calories to maintain their new size. This is a normal reaction to weight loss; what was surprising was that as time passed and the people gained back weight, their metabolisms continued to slow, making the process harder.

The winner of season 8, Danny Cahill, lost nearly 240 pounds in less than a year. Since then, he’s gained back 100 pounds, the Times reports. But the findings may also apply to people who lose less.

The new study adds to a growing body of research aimed at understanding why it’s so difficult for people to lose weight, and why some are more successful than others. Other recent studies have suggested that people’s bodies respond dramatically differently to the same foods. In the future, weight loss advice may need to be more personalized, some experts suggest.

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

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Here’s the Best Way to Prevent Blisters

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Whether you’ve walked miles in hiking boots or a new pair of high heels, you know the pain of a blister. “People have been getting blisters as long as we’ve been outside,” says Dr. Grant Lipman, clinical associate professor of emergency medicine at Stanford Medicine.

Experts still disagree on how to prevent them. But in a new study published in the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, Lipman and his colleagues found that the cheapest solution may also be the best: surgical paper tape.

To find out if paper tape really helps stop blisters from forming, Lipman decided to study ultramarathon runners. “Their feet are just getting wrecked,” Lipman says. Blisters are the single most devastating factor affecting an ultramarathon runner’s performance.

In RacingThePlanet, a grueling 155-mile ultramarathon across four deserts, a team of medical assistants followed 128 runners who were carrying their own food and gear. The medical team applied Micropore paper tape—the kind available in drugstores—to blister-prone areas of one foot per runner. The other foot served as a control.

At the end of the race, paper tape reduced blisters by 40%. Only 30 of the taped feet got blisters, while 81 of the untaped feet got blisters. And when taped-up feet did get blisters, they got them much later on in the race.

When a spot on the skin is repeatedly rubbed, the skin layers can separate and fill with fluid, which becomes a blister. The way to prevent them is to make the area of the foot more slippery, which eases friction, Lipman explains. Some methods seem to work, but they come with drawbacks; while antiperspirant does the trick for many people, it also irritates their skin, according to past studies. Fancy adhesive pads and high-tech gels can work, but they’re expensive.

Paper surgical tape not only works, but comes with lots of advantages. “It’s not too adhesive, so it won’t rip the underlying blister’s roof off,” Lipman says. “One roll of this over-the-counter ubiquitous cheap little tape can last for years.”

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

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