Fat Loss 

Understanding Your Body Type for Ultimate Fat Loss and Muscle… (Diary of a Fit Mommy)

Understanding Your Body Type for Ultimate Fat Loss and Muscle… Source by jyv92

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Fat Loss 

Diary of a Fit Mommy: NEW 4 Week Home Programs & Clean Eating Meal Plan Pre-RELEASE SALE!

30 day ab home workout program. No gym required! #sixpack #abs #tummypooch Source by diaryoffitmom

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Fat Loss 

Diary of a Fit Mommy » 5 Exercises to Build Your Booty

Before and after butt workout – the only butt workout you'll ever need – 5 fat burning exercises for your booty. Source by kaneshamoore

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Weight Loss 

Diary of a Fit Mommy » Get Beach Body Ready NOW!!

Before and after doing the Booty & Thigh Blaster workout from the 12 week workout program. Source by diaryoffitmom

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Fat Loss 

Diary of a Fit Mommy » At Home Thigh Slimming Exercises for Pregnancy

How to reduce pregnancy thigh weight gain.. I always gain fat in this area!! Source by diaryoffitmom

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Fat Loss 

Diary of a Fit Mommy: NEW 4 Week Home Programs & Clean Eating Meal Plan Pre-RELEASE SALE!

20lb weightloss in 12 weeks. #transform #weightloss #workout Source by Tracy05112013

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Fat Loss 

Diary of a Fit Mommy » Get Beach Body Ready NOW!!

Before and after butt workout – the only butt workout you'll ever need. Source by jenmichelitch

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Uncategorized 

7 of the best fitness social media accounts to follow now

www.judgeweightloss.com

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

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There’s no denying our Instagram feeds are a prime source of motivation. So we’ve sourced seven of the best social media accounts to help you stay motivated and inspired, grouped by your goals.

For fat-loss fortitude  

A Google search of ‘fat loss’ will see enough returns to bring on a migraine. We’ve sorted the sensible from the silly so you can maximise your shred.  

Alexa Towersey @actionalexa

Alexa_14.jpg

What you get: 

Along with inspiring quotes and epic action shots (no squatting in a G-string here, folks), Towersey posts weekly examples of fat-burning circuits and booty-building exercises for you to try at home. And as a woman with years of experience and who trains some of Sydney’s top models, you are inclined to take her advice. With a scientific yet readable caption style, Towersey regularly reminds you of why rest, recovery and stress management are integral to your fat-loss goals – ’cause, let’s face it, it’s easy to forget come Monday morning.  

What you don’t get: 

Half-naked selfies or long opinionated rants, thank goodness. Just knowledge, working examples and ancillary training methods so you can max your goals.

Top tip: 

“Train for your objective. Training to put on muscle is very different to training for strength, which is different to training for weight loss and different again to training for a specific sport. Remember, movement is not always progress. You can run in place and never get anywhere.”

Tom Venuto burnthefatblog.com 

What you get:

Tips on leaning out from a natural bodybuilder – because why wouldn’t you take advice from those whose job it is to eradicate fat? A science boffin, Venuto posts about once a week and covers current fitness controversies – from the science behind eating more fat to whether you should be performing a crunch. If you’re looking for less-ordinary tips with the backing of a lab coat and academic studies to give you an edge, Venuto is your man.

What you don’t get: 

One-size-fits-all workouts, training programs or nutrition plans. This blog is all about current research and the underlying factors affecting progress than cookie cutter routines. Sure, there are example workouts scattered here and there, but it’s not the place to go for daily pre-workout inspiration. You will have to plan your training yourself.

Top tip:  

“Doing nothing but cardio is a mistake. But cutting out cardio completely is also a mistake. The truth lies in the middle. Maximum fat burning occurs when you combine cardio training and weight training together. For health and weight maintenance, I would suggest three short cardio workouts per week, about 20 to 30 minutes per session. But for maximum fat loss, I recommend four to seven days per week of cardio or other vigorous physical activity for 30 to 45 minutes (based on results) at a moderate pace.”

NEXT: Muscle madness

For muscle madness

If you’re looking to hit up the weights room to improve strength, tone and support fat loss (or just to look bad-ass – guilty!), these are the web accounts set to inspire. 

Lauren Simpson (Snapchat: laurensimpsonnn)

Lauren-Simpson.jpg

What you get: 

This young Sydney-sider is the perfect combo of body composition inspiration and information. You’ll be spoilt with regular rig/ab selfies as she preps for her next bikini comp, behind-the-scenes access to her numerous photoshoots, supplement discount codes, high-protein recipes and – our favourite – weighted workouts ripe for screen-shotting. She even encourages it. 

What you don’t get: 

Anything cardio based – she just doesn’t do it (ectomorph and naturally lean body shape perks). Simpson is renowned for her powerlifting and hypertrophy protocols to create the curves that have seen her win a recent WBFF pro card, so she may be hard to relate to for those looking to drop fat and create curves more steadily. 

Top tip: 

A recent leg workout from her Snap stream:

Superset

» Paused squat –
3 sets of 5 reps

» Hamstring curls –
3 sets of 5 reps (toes turned out, heels touching) 

» Pendulum squats –
5 sets of 15 reps

» Split squats –
4 sets of 8 reps (each side, back foot elevated)

Nia Shanks (niashanks.com)

What you get:

Blog posts from a qualified trainer about everything from staying motivated to fat loss, but we particularly love her spiels on weight training. Not only do you get specific workouts and training programs based on your goals and time constraints (often with supporting video content), she also explains why you are doing what you are doing – whether that be a certain rep range or using a particular piece of equipment. It’s probably more suited to the intermediate weight lifter – although there are some body weight posts and beginner variations if you are just starting out. 

What you don’t get: 

Blogs about hitting the weights room to improve ‘flaws’ in your physique. Conversely, you also won’t get the ‘just love yourself as you are’ psycho-babble. Shanks finds a way to balance our mental health and self-confidence with our realistic desire to improve. 

Top tip: 

“If you strength train with the primary goal of improving your performance in the gym, you are setting yourself up for success. Unlike cardio, strength training is a great way to set positive, motivating goals that will keep you going in the gym week after week, month after month, and year after year.”

NEXT: For flexi fitness

For flexi fitness

The yogi yodas need their social fill too. To bring the zen to your computer screen, here are our top picks for scientific knowledge and practical tips to deepen the stretch.

Kate Kendall @activeyogi

Kate-Kendall-2.jpg

What you get:

Let’s face it – sometimes we just want to chill on the couch, look at some pretty pictures and be inspired to hit the mat in the morning. Aussie-born and -bred yoga instructor Kate Kendall’s Instagram account is our go-to for beautiful bendy moves in obscene scenery. Her captions remind us to get outdoors, be with friends and just stretch. Plus, it’s always kind of interesting to see where her career as a Blackmores ambassador and her own yogi studio take her – whether that be instructing nighttime silent disco yoga sessions or standing side by side with other fitspo celebs.

What you don’t GET:

Actual informative tips on the practice of yoga – for that you will need to head to one of her classes. 

Top tip: 

Kate shared this quote from Sharon Gannon, founder of Jivamukti Yoga: “You cannot do yoga. Yoga is your natural state. What you can do are yoga exercises, which may reveal to you where you are resisting your natural state.” Deep.

Rachel Scott rachelyoga.com 

What you get: 

Yoga enthusiast and the director of Teachers’ College and Development YYoga, Rachel Scott’s website is all about education. With clean lines and easy-to-read spacing, her blog posts range from the quick and simple step-by-step instructions on a particular pose to a moving diary-style entry on anxiety and depression and how yoga has helped to heal. Encompassing the merging of spirituality and physicality native to true yogis, her blog posts are beautiful, short, sharp and informative, and you can pick and choose what you read depending on your mood or motives for the day – the archives are pretty extensive. 

What you don’t get:

Regular updates – admittedly her posts are usually one or two a month, but at other times they are more sparse. If consistency is key to building your relationship with your blogger, then maybe look elsewhere. 

Top tip: 

“Our mats are not places to be perfect, or even places that we have to be particularly happy. They are places to be authentic. The mat is a place where it’s okay to cry. They are places to give ourselves permission to feel, practise self-care, and use our beautiful physical bodies to potentially shift our experiences. We can move with our feelings rather than cover them up.”

NEXT: For running ragged

For running ragged

For those who love to hit the pavement, these steady-state cardio training accounts will help get the blood pumping. 

Deena Kastor @deena8050

What you get:

If you are well and truly sick of an Insta-feed filled with puppies, children (yes, he/she is adorable but…) and green smoothies, take a look at former Olympian Deena Kastor’s running Insta account. Her photographs will have you pining for an active holiday or a stroll around your nearest river with regular snaps of stunning sceneries from her track of that day. Her captions are a mix of inspiring quotes, reflections on the running life and diary entries of her favourite events and experiences. Okay and yes – the odd dog/child/green smoothie does pop up (she has all three). We love it really.

What you don’t GET:

Boring activewear selfies or overtly posed stretches. Refreshingly real, Kastor would rather give you a glimpse of nature and push you to pull on the running shoes rather than her own (albeit lithe) body.

Top tip:

“When faced with a challenge, it’s easy to feel small, but go down that trail as fast and safely as you can and feel as majestic as the mountains that stand over you.”

 

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How Posting on Facebook Affects Your Memory

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The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

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Posting about personal experiences on social media makes them easier to remember in the future, finds a new study—and no, it’s not just because Facebook reminds you of them every year.

Scientists have long known that writing down, talking about, or otherwise reflecting on events can help people recall them later. And one might assume that posting about them on social media sites—such as Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, or a personal blog—could have similar, positive effects, the study authors wrote in the journal Memory.

But social media posts could have an opposite effect, as well: Research has also shown that when we become used to having information digitally available at all times, we tend to become reliant on the Internet and forget details more easily. “Accordingly, many of our life details may no longer need to be internally stored and retrieved if we know that we can later refer to our online journals to locate the information,” they wrote.

So the researchers set out to see which of these theories was true, in the first study to look at the effects of social media on memory.

First, they asked 66 Cornell undergraduates to keep a daily diary for a week. In the diary, they briefly described the events that happened to them each day outside of their normal routines. They were also asked to record whether they had posted about each of these events on social media, and to rate their personal importance and emotional intensity.

At the end of the week and again a week later, the students were given a surprise quiz to see how many events they could recall. During both quizzes, events the students had posted about online were easier for them to remember. This was true even when the researchers controlled for importance or intensity of the event; in other words, people weren’t simply posting about significant events they’d be more likely to remember anyway.

“If people want to remember personal experiences, the best way is to put them online,” said lead author Qi Wang, PhD, professor of human development in Cornell University’s College of Human Ecology, in a press release. All types of social media provide an important outlet for sharing experiences with others, she added, which can be an important part of the memory-building process.

“The process of writing about one's experiences in the public sphere, often sustained by subsequent social feedback, may allow people to reflect on the experiences and their personal relevance,” the authors wrote.

The study also noted that sharing personal perspectives of recent events on social media also helps people create and shape their “sense of self.”

“That’s happening when we use social media, without us even noticing it,” Wang explained. “We just think, ‘Oh, I’m sharing my experience with my friends.’ But by shaping the way we remember our experiences, it's also shaping who we are.” Features that allow you to look back at memories from the past—like Facebook’s On this Day feature or the third-party Timehop app—can help reinforce that sense of self, she said.

“Memory is often selective,” Wang said. “But in this case, the selection is not done by our own mind; it’s done by an outside resource. So interactive functions on social networking sites can also shape how we view our experiences, how we view ourselves.”

In fact, the authors write, the “virtual externalization of personal memories has become commonplace” in this technology-driven age. And their study, they say, is “the first step toward a better understanding of the autobiographical self in the Internet era.”

 

This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

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How to Fall Asleep Fast, According to 6 Health Editors

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The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

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Sleep experts have tons of tricks to getting a better night's rest: go easy on the caffeine and alcohol, take a warm bath before bed, keep the thermostat set low, ban TV and mobile phones from the bedroom, and so on. But for Health's editors, the bedtime behaviors that help us fall sleep fast aren't exactly scientifically proven—and in some cases, they'd make the experts cringe. But they work for us, and research shows we're better off for it: the health benefits of sleep include sharper memory, lower stress, and lower risk of chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. Read on for our tried-and-true before-bed routines. 

Sip warm milk

"When I'm having trouble falling asleep, I go into the dark kitchen, heat up some milk and sip it in bed. The funny thing is we have published stories reporting that there is no good science to back up this folk remedy, so maybe it's just placebo effect, but it always works for me." —Lisa Lombardi, executive editor

Follow a specific routine

"I rarely have trouble falling asleep. I think it's because I follow a pretty specific routine every evening to get relaxed and ready for bed. In the hours before bedtime, I often watch a little TV, but only comedies—I've found that high-stakes dramas and gory scenes from Game of Thrones stress me out and keep me up later than I'd like. When it's time to head to bed, I wash my face and brush my teeth, and follow that up with my night cream, which is my one big beauty indulgence: Estée Lauder Resilience Lift Night ($86; nordstrom.com). The sweet floral scent helps tell my body it's bedtime. After I get into bed, I read a book until I can no longer keep my eyes open, and then roll onto my left side to fall asleep. Yes, it HAS to be my left side—not sure why!" —Christine Mattheis, deputy editor

Sniff some lavender

“Lavender is my go-to scent when I want to relax and fall asleep fast. I am obsessed with my DW Relaxing Lavender Candle ($28; amazon.com)—so much so that I’ve burned through the 13-ounce jar…twice. I’ll usually have the candle burning while I’m getting my clothes and bag ready for the next day and then I will blow it out right before I get into bed (safety first!). The lingering scent helps me drift right off to sleep.” —Lindsey Murray, assistant editor

Stretch it out

"I used to be a terrible sleeper, but I've really worked on it over the last few years since I've learned how crucial good sleep is to overall health. I stretch for around 15 minutes (also working on my flexibility, another area that needs improvement!), and drink a magnesium supplement that helps relax me (Natural Calm, $25 for 16 oz.; amazon.com). After getting ready for bed, I put coconut oil on my face, then get into bed, set my Beddit sleep tracker ($80; amazon.com), and read a book until I feel my eyes drooping. Then I smooch my husband and drift off." —Beth Lipton, food director

Jot notes in a journal

"I have a 5 Year Diary ($12; amazon.com) that I write in every night before I go to bed. Every page in the book has five paragraph entries, so you can see what you were doing on that specific date five years in a row. There's only enough space to write 3-5 sentences about your day, so it's not as daunting as a traditional journal page might be. I started mine when I first moved to New York City three years ago, and I love looking back and seeing what I've done, who I've been with, and how drastically my life has changed. As you write and gather more entries, it's a great way to gain perspective on your own life while also benefitting from the daily therapeutic benefits of journaling." —MaryAnn Barone, social media editor 

Slip into a food coma 

"Experts may not approve of my approach to falling asleep, but it works for me. I eat small meals throughout the day, and I really look forward to a robust dinner around 8:30 or 9:00 p.m. As soon as my tummy is full, I start getting sleepy. After I brush my teeth, I watch some TV on the couch. I find it really comforting to doze with the TV on if my boyfriend is still awake and actively watching it. If he’s not watching it with me, then I’ll turn the TV off and head to bed. I turn onto my stomach and usually fall asleep within 10 minutes or so." —Janet Lawrence, senior video editor

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