Fat Loss 

Email Submission 85 lbs down and counting! Height: 5’10” SW:… – yourweig…

Email Submission 85 lbs down and counting! Height: 5’10” SW:… – yourweightlossmet… – #weight loss #diet #fitness motivation #before after #workout #fat loss #diet #abs #belly #diet plans #motivation Source by jaseycocos

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The Weight Loss Motivation Bible: How To Program Your Mind For Sustainable Fat Loss

Product Name: The Weight Loss Motivation Bible: How To Program Your Mind For Sustainable Fat Loss Click here to get The Weight Loss Motivation Bible: How To Program Your Mind For Sustainable Fat Loss at discounted price while it’s still available… All orders are protected by SSL encryption – the highest industry standard for online security from trusted vendors. The Weight Loss Motivation Bible: How To Program Your Mind For Sustainable Fat Loss is backed with a 60 Day No Questions Asked Money Back Guarantee. If within the first 60…

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Forget calorie counting: Try this calorie control guide for men and women | Precision Nutrition

Precision-Nutrition_Palm-Sized-Portions_Steak-Example_Male Source by healy0886

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Fat Loss 

Isadora’s Weight Loss Success Story

170 lbs to 106 lbs (64 lb weight loss) over 8 month period via calorie counting, running daily, and once weekly Pilates. Source by anubix

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1 Way to Hit Your Weight-Loss Resolution Every Month

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The weight-loss goal is easily the most popular New Year’s resolution of all time. Gyms flood in January, and markets are cleared out of their healthy staples like kale and quinoa. Then sometime around early February, no one remembers what a New Year’s resolution even is, let alone what they’re doing for their weight-loss goals.

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The best way to approach this? Make yourself a strategy. Use one of these tips for each month of the year and fill out your calendar for 2017 with what you plan to do, January through December. These weight-loss tips have been proven to be effective — and they’re impossibly simple to implement.

One month you’ll be drinking more water, and the next trying new veggie recipes — but the common theme throughout the year is that you’ll be hitting your weight-loss goals. Try these 12 tips in 2017 to have your most successful year yet . . . and don’t forget about that gym membership you paid all that money for!

Join a gym (or a boutique studio that you love): One of the first steps to moving more is committing yourself to a routine. Whether this is your local gym, or a yoga studio near your office, make it convenient. You won’t go if it’s too far away or has crazy hours that don’t work with your schedule. Also, ensure that you love the style of exercise if it’s a studio — you also won’t go if you hate the workout!
Get a tracker: Like a Fitbit or an Apple Watch, specifically! These trackers serve as constant reminders that you need to move more. You’ll get little vibrations and notifications telling you to stand and move — some even tell you to run! Like tying a string around your finger to remind you of a task, these trackers go with you everywhere to remind you to make healthier choices.
Try a new workout: Mixing it up is often the key to success — especially if you’ve hit a plateau. Challenge your body in new ways by trying a workout you’ve never done before. One month, pick this new activity you’re interested in, and stick it out for the whole four weeks. Do it regularly, even if it’s a challenge. Not only will you learn a new skill and mix things up for your body, but you’ll feel stronger and more empowered, too.
Try four new veggie recipes: Adding more vegetables to your diet is essential to weight loss. Find the ones you actually love, and your favorite way to prepare them so you can fall back on your own staple healthy recipe all year long. Not a fan of brussels sprouts? Try a zucchini recipe. Keep going until you find what you love.
Add a vegetable to every meal: We spoke with one woman who told us this was one of the keys to her success — and she lost over 100 pounds! Adding something green to each meal (yes, even breakfast!) will help you get the nutrients you need all day long and create better, long-lasting, healthy habits.
Cut out sugar for one week: Longer if you can! If you find that you’re totally addicted to sugar, that can be a major obstacle in your weight-loss journey. Set aside a week to eliminate processed and added sugarsnatural sugar is OK! If you can keep going, aim for three weeks; that’s how long it’ll take you to really break a habit.
Learn how to count macros . . . and track them for one week to start: Macros are the fats, protein, and carbohydrates in your diet — and the way you balance them can help you lose weight. Start with recipes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner to get a better idea of what your food can look like with macro counting.
Drink a glass of water before every meal: Did you know that our brains often confuse thirst for hunger? Drinking more water — especially before meals — can help control appetite and help you lose weight.
Get eight hours of sleep every night: Celebrity trainer Harley Pasternak listed sleep as a massive component to weight-loss success. You’ll have more energy for your workouts and more alertness to make better dietary choices.
Eat more (healthy) breakfasts: Make it your goal to always eat a healthy breakfast, but one month this year, learn a new breakfast recipe, and make it at least twice a week. Breakfast can kickstart your metabolism, curb a sweet tooth, and control appetite — all leading to weight loss!
Practice mindful eating: Slow down, pause, put your fork down between bites. If overeating or eating too quickly has been a challenge for you, this is an essential practice to take up. Choose a month to practice your mindful eating with every single meal. You might be able to stop food cravings for good!
Focus on digestion: Take one month to focus on digestion-friendly foods (lots of fiber!), probiotics, and even a digestion-aiding practice like acupuncture or traditional Chinese medicine. By keeping things regular, you’ll feel better, lighter, and slimmer.

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9 Things to Cut Out in 2017 to Be Healthy

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It’s time for New Year’s resolutions, and we know many of you are planning on cutting back on the unhealthy things in your life. But that doesn’t always mean junk food or sweets — we’ve got some habits that might be holding you back from your healthy goals that you should definitely consider eliminating this year.

Here’s what we’re cutting out in 2017 to have our healthiest year yet.

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Negative self-talk: Stop being mean to yourself. Just stop. You are enough! You ARE strong! You’re capable. Start giving yourself more compliments, and make this year about no negative self-talk — ever. The more you berate and degrade yourself, the harder your year will be; you’ll also have a much harder time reaching your healthy goals.

Your scale: Look, quantifiable goals are great, but the scale can be an evil enemy, and doctors agree! If you’ve been obsessed with the scale and every decimal point on your weight, it’s time for that thing to go. In the trash. Forever. Remember that a number on a scale doesn’t reflect the hard work you’re putting in, and the numbers absolutely do not define you.

Workouts you hate: Not everyone likes running, and that’s OK. Forcing yourself into a workout that you hate definitely won’t encourage you to keep working out. There are alternatives to running — and so many other kinds of cardio exercises. If you hate bootcamp classes, try barre. Hate barre? Stop doing it! Try yoga. If something’s not working, try a new studio or new instructor. Keep going until you find something that clicks, but absolutely do not keep going to a class or attempting a workout you don’t like.

Exercising to “fix” or change a part of your body: Working out because you “hate” your body is the worst thing you can do. Exercise makes you feel good — it celebrates your body, makes you feel empowered, and sends a rush of feel-good endorphins through your body. Working out will boost your energy, improve your health, and can change your mood for the better, alongside so many other benefits. Celebrate your body, don’t try to “fix” it.

Kale (or that one food you just can’t stand): A lot of you hate kale. So stop forcing it! You don’t need kale to be healthy! Maybe it’s not kale, but it’s another healthy food you’ve been forcing yourself to eat under the pretense that it’s healthy and you “need it” to be healthy yourself. This just isn’t true, and if your diet consists of things you don’t love, you’re not going to stay on that diet for very long. For a more sustainable diet, experiment more with other healthy foods to find out what you do love. You’ll be eating healthier all the time!

Perfectionism: Striving for a goal is great; striving for perfection is unhealthy. Giving yourself unrealistic or unattainable goals is detrimental to your mental and your physical health. That desire for perfectionism can often be a defense mechanism, when you’re either consciously or subconsciously protecting yourself from the judgment of others. Focus that energy on progress, not perfection, and you’ll have a much better year.

Calorie counting: This year, stop obsessing over calories — especially if it has created a negative relationship with food. Food is fuel, and we need calories to have strong muscles, bones, and a functioning body! There are so many ways to track your food and eat healthy without calorie counting. If you need the data and numbers to stay in control of your healthy eating, try looking into counting macros — you’ll have a healthy balance of protein, fats, and carbohydrates each day.

Stress: Whether you have clinical anxiety or you’ve been stressing way too much in 2016, your compromised mental health can have a seriously negative impact on your health. Stress can cause weight gain, bloating, physical pain, skin problems, and more. Quite a setback for your healthiest year yet, right? To relax and cut out stress in 2017, get yourself a great therapist, or try a self-care practice like diffusing essential oils.

Everything that is holding you back: What is keeping you from being your best self and living your best life? Is it an unhealthy relationship, a terrible job that drains you of your energy, or a deep-seated fear? Let. It. Go. Cut the people out who don’t support you. Say goodbye to work that doesn’t make you feel good — or worse, makes you feel bad. Remove unnecessary obligations that keep you from reaching your physical, mental, and personal goals. This is YOUR time! Replace these things with activities that help you reach your goals, a job that fosters your creativity and empowers you, and relationships with people who build you up.

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4 Ways Feeling Grateful Can Improve Your Life

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Fill your marriage with gratitude: It’s been shown to boost commitment.

Showing appreciation, counting your blessings—whatever you call it, gratitude is a key component of physical and emotional well-being. In fact, feeling thankful translated to better mood, higher sleep quality, and reduced inflammation in heart-failure patients, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association. And day-to-day perks like these make the habit all the more worth it.

RELATED: 9 Ways Gratitude Can Make You Happier, Fitter, and Richer

It improves your week

Try jotting down those “Hooray!” moments as you go through your day. A study from gratitude expert Robert Emmons, PhD, showed that people who kept weekly gratitude journals were more optimistic and happier overall than folks who recorded hassles or uneventful happenings.

It tightens our bonds

When college students who were mentoring high schoolers received a handwritten thank-you note from their mentee, they rated the mentee as having a warmer personality, found a 2015 study in Emotion. And they were more apt to give the high schooler their contact information.

RELATED: This Is the Secret to a Long and Happy Marriage, According to Research

It makes you resilient

Undergrad students who expressed gratitude—by thanking others, for example—tended to have higher self-esteem and, in turn, appeared less vulnerable to depression or hopelessness, according to 2015 research published in the Scandinavian Journal of Psychology.

It bolsters your patience

In a study published in Psychological Science, participants who were asked to recall a time they felt grateful, then choose between getting a smaller monetary reward soon or a bigger one later, were more willing to wait for the bigger payout than those who didn’t think thankful thoughts.

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We Tried Cricket Chocolate Chip Cookies So You Don’t Have To

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CRICKET cookies. Yes, you read that right. Entomophagy is by no means a new practice to those of other countries, but the eating of insects is quickly gaining momentum in the Western world. They say it’s the future of low-fat, high-protein cooking. Plus, you eat the whole thing. Sustainable much?

Get this: Just 100 grams of cricket contains a whopping 12.9 grams of protein. Ounce for ounce, you get nearly twice the protein of beef. They’re also a complete protein, which means they contain all nine of the essential amino acids. It’s hard to argue with stats like that.

Still not convinced? We figured. We know these critter cookies aren’t for the faint of heart, so that’s why we gave them a try for you.

RELATED: DIY Breakfast Tarts

On one recent, fateful day in our food studios here in Birmingham, Alabama, we developed and taste-tested a recipe for chocolate chip cookies that included 2 cups of cricket flour. “Oh, whew, cricket flour. That’s not so bad,” you say? Well, we also tossed in an additional 1/2 cup of dry, roasted whole crickets with the chocolate chips just for the fun of it. So. Fun.

After shooting the video and baking the cookies, it was time to ensue the taste test. Our team of pro chefs and bakers gathered around the large tasting table and stared at the plate of bug cookies piled high in the center. The conversation went something like this:

“Yeah, these are Fear Factor cookies right here.”

“Come on guys, be brave and grab a good one. You want to see some real crickets in there.”


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RELATED: The Top 10 Newbie Cooking Mistakes

(Everyone grabs a cookie)

“I don’t think I got enough cricket.”

“No, no…the less body parts the better.”

“I want to really taste the cricket. I need more cricket.” (Grabs a different cookie)

 “That one’s a whole abdomen. Uh, yep. That’s a cricket family.”

(Counting to 3, they all take a bite simultaneously.)

“I think I can feel legs between my teeth.”

“It’s just like walnuts. Little crunch. Definitely crispy.”

“I can basically feel it, like, moving in my mouth. Hmm. It’s pretty nice.”

“Honestly, these are pretty good. They taste like normal chocolate chip cookies with a nutty undertone.”

“Just okay. They taste kind of grainy. Is that the crickets?”

“I think it’s good.”

“They taste very earthy and nutty, just like what you’d expect from a wheat flour chocolate chip cookie. I could have done without the addition of the dry, roasted crickets.”

(More thoughts later on…)

“If you just grabbed the cookie and didn’t know what it was, you honestly wouldn’t know.”

“Not the best chocolate chip cookie I’ve ever had.”

“I took them home to my 12-year-old son, and he ate it because he’s adventurous and loves trying new things. He thought they were fun. My 8-year-old daughter also tried it. She didn’t spit it out.”

“I wasn’t worried about the bugs. I knew I was about to eat a cricket cookie, so the bugs didn’t freak me out.”

Overall? Our editors actually gave these cricket cookies a thumbs up. Check out the video from the official tasting.

This article originally appeared on MyRecipes.com.

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This Is the Compelling Science Behind Fitness Trackers

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I wear a fitness tracker that monitors how many steps I take each day. Ask me why, and I’ll tell you I’m not quite sure. Push me, and I’ll say it’s fun. It sort of appeals to my sense of achievement to know if I hit my Fitbit-suggested target every day of 10,000 steps.

My dichotomous enjoyment/ambivalence isn’t unusual. The companies making the trackers claim that counting your steps leads to better health. But as a user the evidence feels shaky. Stacey Burr, vice-president of wearable sports electronics for the German sneaker maker Adidas, makes a powerful argument that such nitpicking misses the point. How to use the collected information is “the next frontier,” she says. “Right now it’s about how to get people moving more and to stay with it.”

The data backs up Burr’s assertion. Just 1% of the U.S. population engages in regular vigorous exercise, she says. Seventy percent is “inactive,” a description that applies to an appallingly high percentage of children. View fitness trackers from that perspective, and the focus shifts from ‘what does this information mean?’ to ‘just getting inactive people moving is a good thing.’

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Burr, a founder of a sensor-based clothing business called Textronix that Adidas bought, spoke Wednesday at a lunch panel on “The Exercise Cure: The High-Tech Science of Fitness” at Fortune’s Brainstorm Health conference in San Diego. She says a huge opportunity for combating childhood obesity is teaching kids to be active. School systems have begun experimenting with heart-rate monitors, for example, that kids wear during gym class. Grades are based on minutes of elevated heart-rate activity, and baseline measurements can shift for children of different athletic abilities. Burr says educators have found correlations between more activity and better attendance, behavior, and academic achievement.

Yes, there’s a commercial angle here. Adidas ADDYY -6.07% has released a wrist-based heart-rate monitor for kids called Zone. It’ll be good for kids if the product succeeds.

Maybe this fitness-tracker thing really is about more than fun.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com.

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How to Start a Gratitude Habit in 21 Days

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Why give thanks? Plain and simple, feeling grateful is good for us. Research shows that counting your blessings has many benefits, from better sleep to reduced depression. “It helps you connect to others and be more optimistic and less likely to ruminate over the negative,” says Emiliana Simon-Thomas, PhD, science director of the Greater Good Science Center at the University of California, Berkeley. Cementing the habit takes minimal effort. Follow this 21-day path to more appreciative living. 

Week 1: Notice the good

“Gratitude isn’t one-size-fits-all,” says sociologist and happiness expert Christine Carter, PhD. These tips help you be thankful in a way that makes sense for you. 

Think in threes: Start off each morning by identifying three things you’re grateful for (your kids, your comfy bedsheets, your cute toes—anything). Try not to repeat things, advises Carter, and get more specific and detailed as you go: “For a daily gratitude practice to really be effective, there needs to be novelty so you don’t just get on autopilot,” she says. 

Choose your weapon: For some, journaling about the three good things works; others may prefer sharing them with a friend via text or using the voice recorder on their smartphone. 

Talk the talk: The most grateful people have learned to use language that emphasizes gifts, blessings, fortune, and abundance, says gratitude expert Robert Emmons, PhD. “Less grateful people are preoccupied with burdens, deprivations, entitlements, and complaints,” he explains. Instead of saying, “Ugh, I cannot believe I had to wait so long to get a day off,” try, “What an opportunity this free time is.”

RELATED: How You Answer This Question Says a Lot About Your Happiness

Week 2: Go beyond yourself

Improve how you dish out thanks toward your loved ones and community, still keeping in mind the gratitude guidelines from week one. 

Upgrade “thanks”: Express appreciation to someone every day this week, being super specific. "Thank you for taking care of the kids while I was away on business" is much more powerful than "Thanks for everything this weekend."

Pen a letter: Write a heartfelt note to a mentor, family member, or friend detailing how he or she has impacted your life in a positive way. If possible, read it aloud in person, or schedule a video chat session to share it.

Be of service: "Most people end up feeling extra grateful for their own blessings when they give back in some way," says Simon-Thomas. Find a volunteering opportunity that interests you and schedule time to participate.

RELATED: 22 Ways to Get Happy Now

Week 3: Think outside the box

Now it’s all about seeing good fortune everywhere. 

Look for unexpected heroes: Don’t journal just about people who’ve helped you, says Emmons, but also about those who’ve been there for your loved ones. When you list your three good things this week, call out these indirect joy bringers (like the caretaker who assists your ailing mom, the teacher who is endlessly patient with your child or the great guy about to marry your BFF).

Find silver linings: Write down three less-than-perfect experiences and consider how they actually benefited you. Perhaps quitting a bad job opened the door to a new opportunity. Or maybe you’re thankful that an ex was brave enough to end your relationship when you both knew it wasn’t working anymore.

Take it to the office: "The workplace is one of the places gratitude is lacking the most," says Simon-Thomas. Show a boss, peer, or intern some appreciation this week. Don’t be surprised if the good vibes come back to you. Gratitude often has a boomerang effect.

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