Weight Loss 

M/23/5’11” [220.4lbs > 169.7lbs = 52.7lbs] (5 months) My weight loss is minor compared to most others here but I wanted to share. I followed a strict CiCo diet with a 1 hour walk everyday for 5 months. I’m feeling confident for the first time in years!

M/23/5’11” [220.4lbs > 169.7lbs = 52.7lbs] (5 months) My weight loss is minor compared to most others here but I wanted to share. I followed a strict CiCo diet with a 1 hour walk everyday for 5 months. I’m feeling confident for the first time in years! View Reddit by dolandor – View Source

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Weight Loss 

F/21/5’3″ [138lbs > 133lbs = 5 lbs] Didn’t think I was making any progress until I compared progress pics! Definitely not noticeable to most but still made my day!

F/21/5’3″ [138lbs > 133lbs = 5 lbs] Didn’t think I was making any progress until I compared progress pics! Definitely not noticeable to most but still made my day! View Reddit by losingsome – View Source

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Fat Loss 

Female Fat Loss I have developed the “Female Fat Loss” to give you noticea…

Female Fat Loss I have developed the “Female Fat Loss” to give you noticeable fat loss in ten days. I understand that it’s harder for women to lose fat compared to their male counterparts, due to your different hormonal and genetic differences and females will put on body fat far easier. Read more at www.jamesmorrispt… Source by jamesmorrispt

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Weight Loss 

F/18/5″2′ [140lbs > 124lbs = 16lbs] 1 year,never noticed the difference until i compared the pictures…

F/18/5″2′ [140lbs > 124lbs = 16lbs] 1 year,never noticed the difference until i compared the pictures… View Reddit by fawizzle – View Source

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FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction

http://www.judgeweightloss.com/bikinibutt

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) — A new long-acting implant that can help treat people addicted to heroin and prescription painkillers was approved Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“Opioid abuse and addiction have taken a devastating toll on American families. We must do everything we can to make new, innovative treatment options available that can help patients regain control over their lives,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert M. Califf said in a statement. “Today’s approval provides the first-ever implantable option to support patients’ efforts to maintain treatment as part of their overall recovery program.”

Probuphine is placed in the upper arm of recovering addicts and releases a steady six-month dose of buprenorphine, an anti-addiction drug designed to combat the cravings that come with opioids like heroin or powerful prescription painkillers like Percocet or OxyContin. Buprenorphine is already available as a pill or a film that can be placed in the mouth.

The steady flow from the implant will reduce fluctuations that can occur when taking a medication once or twice daily, and it removes the need for a patient to remember to take it, said Dr. Annie Umbricht, an expert in substance abuse treatment at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

“A person suffering from addiction would not have to go through the up-and-downs of a daily medication, and therefore will feel much more normal,” Umbricht explained.

Clinical trials published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2010 showed the implant led to higher abstinence rates among addicts, with 40 percent remaining drug-free compared with 28 percent receiving a placebo.

People given the implant also were more likely to remain in treatment, about 66 percent compared with 31 percent of the placebo group.

“It really reduces or eliminates cravings, and they don’t start searching around for opiates,” said Dr. Scott Segal, president and chief medical officer of the Segal Institute for Clinical Research in Miami, one of the centers that participated in the clinical trials.

The implant provides patients with no-fail treatment during its six-month period of effectiveness, Segal said.

“Things happen in life,” he said. “You miss your doctor’s appointment, the pharmacy doesn’t have the medication and there’s problems. The implant takes relapse off the table.”

It takes about 15 minutes to place the implant, Segal said, and side effects are similar to oral buprenorphine. They include headache, depression, constipation, nausea, vomiting and back pain, according to the FDA.

“I was concerned that patients would [not] like this option, and I was dead wrong,” he said. “The patients enrolled quickly. They liked it. They tolerated it well. And they were upset when we took them off the implant at the end of the study.”

The United States is experiencing an epidemic of prescription drug abuse, and the new implant could also help counter that, Umbricht said.

There were 28,647 overdose deaths related to heroin and prescription pain killers in 2014, an average of 78 per day, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That’s because people undergo treatment and lose their tolerance for opioids, but then leave treatment with a high risk of relapse, Umbricht said.

“We know the rate of relapse after drug treatment is more than 90 percent,” Umbricht said. “These people have lost their tolerance, but they don’t realize it. They are at high risk for overdose.”

The implant can help stabilize addicts during treatment, and then provide them with support against relapse once they’ve been released, she said.

Buprenorphine provides effects that are similar to, but weaker than, opioids like heroin or methadone, according to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

But those effects level off at moderate doses, lowering the risk of misuse and addiction, SAMHSA says.

Buprenorphine also interferes with the effects of full-strength opiates, Segal said.

“It tends to saturate the receptors that respond to opiates,” he said. “Even if you were to take opiates with it, you won’t get high. It provides pain relief, but doesn’t give them the buzz or high that heroin would.”

The implant eliminates one other concern associated with oral buprenorphine—the likelihood that someone with a prescription will share their pills with friends.

Researchers estimate that as much as 50 percent of oral buprenorphine prescriptions are “diverted,” Umbricht said.

The intent is most likely to help other people quit their drug habit, Umbricht said, but without drug counseling those addicts are not likely to succeed.

“That person is not going to get the psychosocial support they need,” Umbricht said, adding that drug sharing also maintains illegal behaviors that recovering addicts need to shake.

Addiction specialist Dr. Kevin Cotterell agreed.

“The prospect of a long-acting opiate agonist-antagonist surgically implanted for use in the treatment of addiction to opiates is very encouraging,” said Cotterell, a psychiatrist with South Oaks Hospital in Amityville, N.Y. “It will help in overcoming problems with compliance, which is a great barrier to recovery. It will enhance safety and reduce diversion if used widely.”

More information

For more on buprenophine, visit the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.


Also check out http://healthywithjodi.com

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FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction

http://www.judgeweightloss.com

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) — A new long-acting implant that can help treat people addicted to heroin and prescription painkillers was approved Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“Opioid abuse and addiction have taken a devastating toll on American families. We must do everything we can to make new, innovative treatment options available that can help patients regain control over their lives,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert M. Califf said in a statement. “Today’s approval provides the first-ever implantable option to support patients’ efforts to maintain treatment as part of their overall recovery program.”

Probuphine is placed in the upper arm of recovering addicts and releases a steady six-month dose of buprenorphine, an anti-addiction drug designed to combat the cravings that come with opioids like heroin or powerful prescription painkillers like Percocet or OxyContin. Buprenorphine is already available as a pill or a film that can be placed in the mouth.

The steady flow from the implant will reduce fluctuations that can occur when taking a medication once or twice daily, and it removes the need for a patient to remember to take it, said Dr. Annie Umbricht, an expert in substance abuse treatment at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

“A person suffering from addiction would not have to go through the up-and-downs of a daily medication, and therefore will feel much more normal,” Umbricht explained.

Clinical trials published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2010 showed the implant led to higher abstinence rates among addicts, with 40 percent remaining drug-free compared with 28 percent receiving a placebo.

People given the implant also were more likely to remain in treatment, about 66 percent compared with 31 percent of the placebo group.

“It really reduces or eliminates cravings, and they don’t start searching around for opiates,” said Dr. Scott Segal, president and chief medical officer of the Segal Institute for Clinical Research in Miami, one of the centers that participated in the clinical trials.

The implant provides patients with no-fail treatment during its six-month period of effectiveness, Segal said.

“Things happen in life,” he said. “You miss your doctor’s appointment, the pharmacy doesn’t have the medication and there’s problems. The implant takes relapse off the table.”

It takes about 15 minutes to place the implant, Segal said, and side effects are similar to oral buprenorphine. They include headache, depression, constipation, nausea, vomiting and back pain, according to the FDA.

“I was concerned that patients would [not] like this option, and I was dead wrong,” he said. “The patients enrolled quickly. They liked it. They tolerated it well. And they were upset when we took them off the implant at the end of the study.”

The United States is experiencing an epidemic of prescription drug abuse, and the new implant could also help counter that, Umbricht said.

There were 28,647 overdose deaths related to heroin and prescription pain killers in 2014, an average of 78 per day, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That’s because people undergo treatment and lose their tolerance for opioids, but then leave treatment with a high risk of relapse, Umbricht said.

“We know the rate of relapse after drug treatment is more than 90 percent,” Umbricht said. “These people have lost their tolerance, but they don’t realize it. They are at high risk for overdose.”

The implant can help stabilize addicts during treatment, and then provide them with support against relapse once they’ve been released, she said.

Buprenorphine provides effects that are similar to, but weaker than, opioids like heroin or methadone, according to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

But those effects level off at moderate doses, lowering the risk of misuse and addiction, SAMHSA says.

Buprenorphine also interferes with the effects of full-strength opiates, Segal said.

“It tends to saturate the receptors that respond to opiates,” he said. “Even if you were to take opiates with it, you won’t get high. It provides pain relief, but doesn’t give them the buzz or high that heroin would.”

The implant eliminates one other concern associated with oral buprenorphine—the likelihood that someone with a prescription will share their pills with friends.

Researchers estimate that as much as 50 percent of oral buprenorphine prescriptions are “diverted,” Umbricht said.

The intent is most likely to help other people quit their drug habit, Umbricht said, but without drug counseling those addicts are not likely to succeed.

“That person is not going to get the psychosocial support they need,” Umbricht said, adding that drug sharing also maintains illegal behaviors that recovering addicts need to shake.

Addiction specialist Dr. Kevin Cotterell agreed.

“The prospect of a long-acting opiate agonist-antagonist surgically implanted for use in the treatment of addiction to opiates is very encouraging,” said Cotterell, a psychiatrist with South Oaks Hospital in Amityville, N.Y. “It will help in overcoming problems with compliance, which is a great barrier to recovery. It will enhance safety and reduce diversion if used widely.”

More information

For more on buprenophine, visit the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.


Also check out http://healthywithjodi.com

Read More

Sugary Drinks and 'Bad' Carbs May Increase Risk of These Types of Cancer

http://www.judgeweightloss.com/sixpackabs

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

By Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) — People who consume a lot of processed carbohydrates—think snack foods and sweets—and sugary drinks may face heightened risks of breast and prostate cancers, a new study suggests.

Researchers said the study, reported Tuesday at the American Society for Nutrition annual meeting in San Diego, does not prove that “bad” carbs cause cancer.

But given that breast and prostate cancers are two of the most common cancers in the United States, the connection gives more reason for people to cut processed foods from their diets, said lead researcher Nour Makarem.

“The carbohydrate quality of your diet matters for a number of reasons,” said Makarem, a Ph.D. candidate in nutrition at New York University.

In general, health experts already recommend limiting sugary drinks and processed carbohydrates, and eating more fruits, vegetables, legumes, fiber-rich whole grains, and “good” unsaturated fats.

So the new findings—considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal—add more weight to that advice, Makarem said.

She pointed, in particular, to the link her team found between sugar-sweetened drinks (both soda and fruit juice) and prostate cancer risk. Compared with men who never drank sugary beverages, those who had them a few times a week showed more than triple the risk of developing prostate cancer.

And that was with other factors—including obesity, smoking, and other diet habits—taken into account, Makarem said.

Still, it is difficult to weed out the effects of particular diet habits on cancer risk, said Marji McCullough, strategic director of nutritional epidemiology for the American Cancer Society.

“Few dietary factors apart from alcohol and/or obesity have been consistently related to postmenopausal breast cancer and prostate cancer,” McCullough said.

The question of whether carbohydrate quality affects cancer risk—independent of obesity—is important, according to McCullough. But it’s also a “challenging” one to answer, she said.

The new findings are based on nearly 3,200 U.S. adults whose diet habits and cancer rates were tracked for more than 20 years. During that time, 565 people were diagnosed with cancer.

At first glance, higher carb intake was tied to a lower risk of breast cancer. But the picture changed when carb quality was considered, Makarem noted.

She said that women whose diets emphasized healthy carbs—vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and legumes—were 67 percent less likely to develop breast cancer, compared to women who favored refined carbs. Refined carbs include many baked goods, white bread and white potatoes.

When it came to prostate cancer risk, men who regularly drank sugary juices or soda were more than three times as likely to develop disease versus men who steered clear of those drinks, the findings showed.

That does not prove sweet drinks directly contribute to prostate cancer, Makarem acknowledged. Still, she said, many studies have implicated the beverages in the risks of obesity and type 2 diabetes—so there are other reasons to cut back.

“Plus,” Makarem said, “it’s an easy change to make in your diet.”

The American Beverage Association took issue with the findings.

“The authors of this study abstract acknowledge their findings do not show that beverages cause any disease,” the group said in a statement. “Moreover, the study was limited to one demographic group that is not reflective of the population of the United States.” (Most study participants were white.)

The beverage association also said that the American Cancer Society cites multiple potential risk factors for breast, prostate and colon cancer, so singling out diet is difficult. The group also said that because the study hasn’t been published in a peer-reviewed journal, “very few study details are available” and it’s therefore tough to draw firm conclusions.

Sugary drinks weren’t the only diet factor that mattered, though, according to the researchers. Prostate cancer risk was also heightened among men whose diets were generally high in “glycemic load”—which, Makarem said, basically means they ate a lot of refined carbs.

The study also implicated “processed lunch foods,” including pizza, deli meats, and burgers. Men who ate those foods four or more times a week were twice as likely to develop prostate cancer, compared to men who had them no more than once a week, the researchers found.

According to McCullough, it’s hard to know whether certain foods, per se, contribute to breast or prostate cancers—or whether, for example, it’s overall calorie intake and weight gain that are the true culprits.

But the bottom line, Makarem said, is that whole, “high-quality” foods are a generally healthier choice than processed ones.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more on diet and cancer risk.


Also check out http://healthywithjodi.com

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This Is the Year I'm Actually Going to Run a Marathon

http://www.popsugar.com/fitness/How-Run-Your-First-Marathon-42855054

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

This is the year I’m actually going to run a marathon. There. I said it! In fact, it’s one of my New Year’s resolutions. It was last year’s, too . . . but I chickened out. Now, before all you millions and billions of strangers (hey, guys!), I’m claiming it: I WILL run a marathon in 2017.

And now that I’ve said it, I can admit that I’m completely terrified. Though I ran my first five half marathons in less than two years, this is a big, lofty, scary goal for me. Instead of leaving one huge, daunting goal looming in the distance of 2017, I decided to give myself more actionable objectives to better structure my year for success (hello, I’m an A-type, nice to meet you).

And I know it might seem like I’m a fitness editor, and that this is no big deal since I work out literally every day, but please keep in mind that in 2014, I couldn’t run a mile in under 15 minutes without stopping to take several breaks. I’ve proven myself wrong before, broken down walls internally, and surprised myself in ways I never could’ve dreamed of — and if I can do it, anyone can do it!

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Are you thinking of taking on this big challenge in 2017? Let’s do it together! Here are some benchmarks I’m giving myself to set myself up for my first big 26.2 . . . and all the miles leading up to it.

Buy the damn bib. Step one of making sure I don’t back out of something: spend a lot of money. How else do you think I get up at 6 a.m. for SoulCycle? I can’t lose $32! Once you commit financially, you’ll be less likely to back out. I have my sights set on the Big Apple, so I’ll most likely be signing up for a Team in Training to get myself a spot in the race.
Get a second opinion . . . on shoes. Earlier this year I went on a run with Nike running coach Blue Benadum (he’s run almost 60 marathons!). And although I’ve done some shoe fittings that indicated I need more of a stability shoe, he analyzed my mid- to forefoot strike and told me I was wearing too much cushion in the heel. Apparently it’s time for a reevaluation! Ultramarathoner and coach Robin Arzon also emphasized to me the importance of choosing the right shoe, so I’ll be going through several fittings. Checking this off my list will help me feel more prepared and secure in my decision.
Schedule out other races this year. One way to make this race less scary is to schedule a handful of longer races and half marathons before the date of my full marathon. I’m already registered for a 10.6 miler at the Big Sur International Marathon (yay for checking things off my list of goals!), and I’m hoping to do a Disney half marathon at some point, too. Although these will still be HUGE victories and major goals for me (it’s still a lot of miles!), compared to the big race, they’ll be my mini victories along the way — or as Robin Arzon calls them, “micro successes.
Commit to cross-training. This race isn’t just about running — I want to make sure my body is strong enough and my endurance is *all the way up* so that I don’t feel destroyed at the end of this thing. I especially need to focus on my leg strength, as I have some run-induced patella inflammation that could potentially sideline me. Physical therapy, leg day, and foam rolling will be of the utmost importance this year.
Don’t wait for a certain date to start training. I talked with 11-time Ironman finisher and coach Marni Sumbal about this new adventure I’m embarking on, and this was her advice: don’t wait, start now. “Think of every day between now and your future half marathon as available time to get stronger and improve your endurance.” It made so much sense — waiting to start training is like procrastinating on a project you’re afraid of. I’ve already started running a little bit more than usual to get 2017 off on the right foot.
Choose the right training program. Although I plan on starting my training nearly a year in advance of my marathon, you can bet I’ll be following a strict beginner marathon training program about five months out. Commitment to this program is a goal within a goal.
Make mental health a priority. I may or may not have an emotional breakdown during training — knowing that ahead of time and preparing for “the worst” in a sense will remind me to cut myself some slack when things don’t go according to plan. Don’t beat yourself up if you miss a run, or you don’t make a certain time, or you don’t feel your best on one of your training days; this is a marathon, not a sprint! Literally! Your commitment to this huge physical and mental goal is a gift to yourself; you’re celebrating your health and your body, so don’t get hung up on missteps or bumps in the road, and cherish every step on your journey to 26.2.

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What to Do If You Catch a Tummy Bug

http://www.popsugar.com/fitness/Stomach-Bug-Symptoms-Treatment-7454914

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

There are so many unpleasant procedures (think dentist and ob-gyn visits) that seem like a party when compared to the symptoms of a stomach bug. From stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, to the muscle aches, headaches, and fever, these bugs are just dreadful.

Although the actual vomiting element only lasts a day, but sometimes up to three, a stomach virus can leave you feeling tired, achy, and with digestive and intestinal troubles for up to 10 days after. A stomach bug really wrecks a person, and it can take over a week until you begin to eating your normal diet.

Unfortunately the best thing you can do when downed by a virus is let nature take its course and let your body do what it needs to do. You probably won’t feel much like eating, so stick to clear fluids such as water, seltzer, ginger ale, ginger tea, and ice chips. If you do feel like eating a little, stick to bland foods like bread, crackers, broth, or white rice. Avoid dairy products, caffeine, and alcohol, since they’ll just aggravate your entire digestive system. Rest as much as you can (between visits to the bathroom), and if you’re really feeling awful, taking some Pepto Bismol, Tums, or other over-the-counter stomach-easing remedies may help.

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You do need to watch out for dehydration caused by losing too many fluids. Not only will dehydration make you feel worse with symptoms including dizziness, dry mouth, and fatigue, but it could also lead to seizures or permanent brain damage if left untreated. Be sure to drink clear fluids often — even popsicles help. Sip small amounts, so they’re more likely to stay down. And just keep in mind that with time, you’ll be back to your old self.

Once you experience a stomach virus, you want to do everything in your power to prevent it from happening again. Since these viruses are highly contagious, wash your hands often, especially when you’re touching public items such as door handles and elevator buttons. Also, keeping up with your healthy diet and regular exercise routine will strengthen your immune system, so if you come in contact with a bug, your body can fight it off.

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