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Fridge-o-nomics: 10 Tips for Weight Loss (Infographic) – Health Essentials from Cleveland Clinic

10 ways to stock your fridge for weight loss Source by zensorium

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FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction

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By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) — A new long-acting implant that can help treat people addicted to heroin and prescription painkillers was approved Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“Opioid abuse and addiction have taken a devastating toll on American families. We must do everything we can to make new, innovative treatment options available that can help patients regain control over their lives,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert M. Califf said in a statement. “Today’s approval provides the first-ever implantable option to support patients’ efforts to maintain treatment as part of their overall recovery program.”

Probuphine is placed in the upper arm of recovering addicts and releases a steady six-month dose of buprenorphine, an anti-addiction drug designed to combat the cravings that come with opioids like heroin or powerful prescription painkillers like Percocet or OxyContin. Buprenorphine is already available as a pill or a film that can be placed in the mouth.

The steady flow from the implant will reduce fluctuations that can occur when taking a medication once or twice daily, and it removes the need for a patient to remember to take it, said Dr. Annie Umbricht, an expert in substance abuse treatment at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

“A person suffering from addiction would not have to go through the up-and-downs of a daily medication, and therefore will feel much more normal,” Umbricht explained.

Clinical trials published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2010 showed the implant led to higher abstinence rates among addicts, with 40 percent remaining drug-free compared with 28 percent receiving a placebo.

People given the implant also were more likely to remain in treatment, about 66 percent compared with 31 percent of the placebo group.

“It really reduces or eliminates cravings, and they don’t start searching around for opiates,” said Dr. Scott Segal, president and chief medical officer of the Segal Institute for Clinical Research in Miami, one of the centers that participated in the clinical trials.

The implant provides patients with no-fail treatment during its six-month period of effectiveness, Segal said.

“Things happen in life,” he said. “You miss your doctor’s appointment, the pharmacy doesn’t have the medication and there’s problems. The implant takes relapse off the table.”

It takes about 15 minutes to place the implant, Segal said, and side effects are similar to oral buprenorphine. They include headache, depression, constipation, nausea, vomiting and back pain, according to the FDA.

“I was concerned that patients would [not] like this option, and I was dead wrong,” he said. “The patients enrolled quickly. They liked it. They tolerated it well. And they were upset when we took them off the implant at the end of the study.”

The United States is experiencing an epidemic of prescription drug abuse, and the new implant could also help counter that, Umbricht said.

There were 28,647 overdose deaths related to heroin and prescription pain killers in 2014, an average of 78 per day, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That’s because people undergo treatment and lose their tolerance for opioids, but then leave treatment with a high risk of relapse, Umbricht said.

“We know the rate of relapse after drug treatment is more than 90 percent,” Umbricht said. “These people have lost their tolerance, but they don’t realize it. They are at high risk for overdose.”

The implant can help stabilize addicts during treatment, and then provide them with support against relapse once they’ve been released, she said.

Buprenorphine provides effects that are similar to, but weaker than, opioids like heroin or methadone, according to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

But those effects level off at moderate doses, lowering the risk of misuse and addiction, SAMHSA says.

Buprenorphine also interferes with the effects of full-strength opiates, Segal said.

“It tends to saturate the receptors that respond to opiates,” he said. “Even if you were to take opiates with it, you won’t get high. It provides pain relief, but doesn’t give them the buzz or high that heroin would.”

The implant eliminates one other concern associated with oral buprenorphine—the likelihood that someone with a prescription will share their pills with friends.

Researchers estimate that as much as 50 percent of oral buprenorphine prescriptions are “diverted,” Umbricht said.

The intent is most likely to help other people quit their drug habit, Umbricht said, but without drug counseling those addicts are not likely to succeed.

“That person is not going to get the psychosocial support they need,” Umbricht said, adding that drug sharing also maintains illegal behaviors that recovering addicts need to shake.

Addiction specialist Dr. Kevin Cotterell agreed.

“The prospect of a long-acting opiate agonist-antagonist surgically implanted for use in the treatment of addiction to opiates is very encouraging,” said Cotterell, a psychiatrist with South Oaks Hospital in Amityville, N.Y. “It will help in overcoming problems with compliance, which is a great barrier to recovery. It will enhance safety and reduce diversion if used widely.”

More information

For more on buprenophine, visit the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.


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FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction

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By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) — A new long-acting implant that can help treat people addicted to heroin and prescription painkillers was approved Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“Opioid abuse and addiction have taken a devastating toll on American families. We must do everything we can to make new, innovative treatment options available that can help patients regain control over their lives,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert M. Califf said in a statement. “Today’s approval provides the first-ever implantable option to support patients’ efforts to maintain treatment as part of their overall recovery program.”

Probuphine is placed in the upper arm of recovering addicts and releases a steady six-month dose of buprenorphine, an anti-addiction drug designed to combat the cravings that come with opioids like heroin or powerful prescription painkillers like Percocet or OxyContin. Buprenorphine is already available as a pill or a film that can be placed in the mouth.

The steady flow from the implant will reduce fluctuations that can occur when taking a medication once or twice daily, and it removes the need for a patient to remember to take it, said Dr. Annie Umbricht, an expert in substance abuse treatment at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

“A person suffering from addiction would not have to go through the up-and-downs of a daily medication, and therefore will feel much more normal,” Umbricht explained.

Clinical trials published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2010 showed the implant led to higher abstinence rates among addicts, with 40 percent remaining drug-free compared with 28 percent receiving a placebo.

People given the implant also were more likely to remain in treatment, about 66 percent compared with 31 percent of the placebo group.

“It really reduces or eliminates cravings, and they don’t start searching around for opiates,” said Dr. Scott Segal, president and chief medical officer of the Segal Institute for Clinical Research in Miami, one of the centers that participated in the clinical trials.

The implant provides patients with no-fail treatment during its six-month period of effectiveness, Segal said.

“Things happen in life,” he said. “You miss your doctor’s appointment, the pharmacy doesn’t have the medication and there’s problems. The implant takes relapse off the table.”

It takes about 15 minutes to place the implant, Segal said, and side effects are similar to oral buprenorphine. They include headache, depression, constipation, nausea, vomiting and back pain, according to the FDA.

“I was concerned that patients would [not] like this option, and I was dead wrong,” he said. “The patients enrolled quickly. They liked it. They tolerated it well. And they were upset when we took them off the implant at the end of the study.”

The United States is experiencing an epidemic of prescription drug abuse, and the new implant could also help counter that, Umbricht said.

There were 28,647 overdose deaths related to heroin and prescription pain killers in 2014, an average of 78 per day, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That’s because people undergo treatment and lose their tolerance for opioids, but then leave treatment with a high risk of relapse, Umbricht said.

“We know the rate of relapse after drug treatment is more than 90 percent,” Umbricht said. “These people have lost their tolerance, but they don’t realize it. They are at high risk for overdose.”

The implant can help stabilize addicts during treatment, and then provide them with support against relapse once they’ve been released, she said.

Buprenorphine provides effects that are similar to, but weaker than, opioids like heroin or methadone, according to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

But those effects level off at moderate doses, lowering the risk of misuse and addiction, SAMHSA says.

Buprenorphine also interferes with the effects of full-strength opiates, Segal said.

“It tends to saturate the receptors that respond to opiates,” he said. “Even if you were to take opiates with it, you won’t get high. It provides pain relief, but doesn’t give them the buzz or high that heroin would.”

The implant eliminates one other concern associated with oral buprenorphine—the likelihood that someone with a prescription will share their pills with friends.

Researchers estimate that as much as 50 percent of oral buprenorphine prescriptions are “diverted,” Umbricht said.

The intent is most likely to help other people quit their drug habit, Umbricht said, but without drug counseling those addicts are not likely to succeed.

“That person is not going to get the psychosocial support they need,” Umbricht said, adding that drug sharing also maintains illegal behaviors that recovering addicts need to shake.

Addiction specialist Dr. Kevin Cotterell agreed.

“The prospect of a long-acting opiate agonist-antagonist surgically implanted for use in the treatment of addiction to opiates is very encouraging,” said Cotterell, a psychiatrist with South Oaks Hospital in Amityville, N.Y. “It will help in overcoming problems with compliance, which is a great barrier to recovery. It will enhance safety and reduce diversion if used widely.”

More information

For more on buprenophine, visit the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.


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9 Things to Cut Out in 2017 to Be Healthy

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It’s time for New Year’s resolutions, and we know many of you are planning on cutting back on the unhealthy things in your life. But that doesn’t always mean junk food or sweets — we’ve got some habits that might be holding you back from your healthy goals that you should definitely consider eliminating this year.

Here’s what we’re cutting out in 2017 to have our healthiest year yet.

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Negative self-talk: Stop being mean to yourself. Just stop. You are enough! You ARE strong! You’re capable. Start giving yourself more compliments, and make this year about no negative self-talk — ever. The more you berate and degrade yourself, the harder your year will be; you’ll also have a much harder time reaching your healthy goals.

Your scale: Look, quantifiable goals are great, but the scale can be an evil enemy, and doctors agree! If you’ve been obsessed with the scale and every decimal point on your weight, it’s time for that thing to go. In the trash. Forever. Remember that a number on a scale doesn’t reflect the hard work you’re putting in, and the numbers absolutely do not define you.

Workouts you hate: Not everyone likes running, and that’s OK. Forcing yourself into a workout that you hate definitely won’t encourage you to keep working out. There are alternatives to running — and so many other kinds of cardio exercises. If you hate bootcamp classes, try barre. Hate barre? Stop doing it! Try yoga. If something’s not working, try a new studio or new instructor. Keep going until you find something that clicks, but absolutely do not keep going to a class or attempting a workout you don’t like.

Exercising to “fix” or change a part of your body: Working out because you “hate” your body is the worst thing you can do. Exercise makes you feel good — it celebrates your body, makes you feel empowered, and sends a rush of feel-good endorphins through your body. Working out will boost your energy, improve your health, and can change your mood for the better, alongside so many other benefits. Celebrate your body, don’t try to “fix” it.

Kale (or that one food you just can’t stand): A lot of you hate kale. So stop forcing it! You don’t need kale to be healthy! Maybe it’s not kale, but it’s another healthy food you’ve been forcing yourself to eat under the pretense that it’s healthy and you “need it” to be healthy yourself. This just isn’t true, and if your diet consists of things you don’t love, you’re not going to stay on that diet for very long. For a more sustainable diet, experiment more with other healthy foods to find out what you do love. You’ll be eating healthier all the time!

Perfectionism: Striving for a goal is great; striving for perfection is unhealthy. Giving yourself unrealistic or unattainable goals is detrimental to your mental and your physical health. That desire for perfectionism can often be a defense mechanism, when you’re either consciously or subconsciously protecting yourself from the judgment of others. Focus that energy on progress, not perfection, and you’ll have a much better year.

Calorie counting: This year, stop obsessing over calories — especially if it has created a negative relationship with food. Food is fuel, and we need calories to have strong muscles, bones, and a functioning body! There are so many ways to track your food and eat healthy without calorie counting. If you need the data and numbers to stay in control of your healthy eating, try looking into counting macros — you’ll have a healthy balance of protein, fats, and carbohydrates each day.

Stress: Whether you have clinical anxiety or you’ve been stressing way too much in 2016, your compromised mental health can have a seriously negative impact on your health. Stress can cause weight gain, bloating, physical pain, skin problems, and more. Quite a setback for your healthiest year yet, right? To relax and cut out stress in 2017, get yourself a great therapist, or try a self-care practice like diffusing essential oils.

Everything that is holding you back: What is keeping you from being your best self and living your best life? Is it an unhealthy relationship, a terrible job that drains you of your energy, or a deep-seated fear? Let. It. Go. Cut the people out who don’t support you. Say goodbye to work that doesn’t make you feel good — or worse, makes you feel bad. Remove unnecessary obligations that keep you from reaching your physical, mental, and personal goals. This is YOUR time! Replace these things with activities that help you reach your goals, a job that fosters your creativity and empowers you, and relationships with people who build you up.

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Hepatitis C Now Kills More Americans Than Any Other Infectious Disease

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Photo: Getty Images

Photo: Getty Images

WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) — The number of hepatitis C-linked deaths in the United States reached a record high in 2014, and the virus now kills more Americans than any other infectious disease, health officials report.

There were 19,659 hepatitis C-related deaths in 2014, according to preliminary data from U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Those tragically high numbers aren’t necessary, one CDC expert said.

“Why are so many Americans dying of this preventable, curable disease? Once hepatitis C testing and treatment are as routine as they are for high cholesterol and colon cancer, we will see people living the long, healthy lives they deserve,” said Dr. Jonathan Mermin said in an agency news release.

He directs the CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.

If not diagnosed and treated, people with hepatitis C are at increased risk for liver cancer and other life-threatening diseases. They may also unknowingly infect others.

The new CDC study found that the number of hepatitis C-related deaths in 2013 exceeded the combined number of deaths from 60 other infectious diseases, including HIV and tuberculosis.

The numbers might even be higher, the agency said. That’s because the new statistics are based on data from death certificates, which often underreport hepatitis C.

Most cases of hepatitis C are among baby boomers—those born between 1945 and 1965. According to the CDC, many were infected during medical procedures such as injections and blood transfusions when these procedures were not as safe as they are now. Many hepatitis C-infected “boomers” may even have lived with the disease for many years without knowing it, the CDC said.

The preliminary data also suggests a new wave of hepatitis C infections among injection drug users. These “acute” cases of hepatitis C infection more than doubled since 2010, increasing to 2,194 reported cases in 2014, the CDC found.

The new cases were mainly among young whites with a history of injection drug use who are living in rural and suburban areas of the Midwest and Eastern United States.

“Because hepatitis C often has few noticeable symptoms, the number of new cases is likely much higher than what is reported. Due to limited screening and underreporting, we estimate the number of new infections is closer to 30,000 per year,” said Dr. John Ward, director of CDC’s Division of Viral Hepatitis.

“We must act now to diagnose and treat hidden infections before they become deadly and to prevent new infections,” he added.

About 3.5 million Americans have hepatitis C and about half are unaware of their infection. One-time hepatitis C testing is recommended for everyone born from 1945 to 1965 and regular testing is suggested for others at high risk, according to the CDC and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Luckily, curative drugs have advanced the treatment of hepatitis C infection over recent years. For people diagnosed with the virus, these new and highly effective treatments can cure the vast majority of infections in two to three months, the CDC said.

The new report was published online May 4 in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on hepatitis C.


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Surgeons Perform First Uterus Transplant in the U.S.

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TIME-logo.jpg

The first uterus transplant in the U.S. was performed this week by surgeons at the Cleveland Clinic, the hospital announced.

The 26-year-old woman who received the transplant is in stable condition after the nine-hour procedure, which took place on Wednesday. The hospital is not releasing further details about the woman.

The goal of the surgery is to allow women born without a uterus, or women who had theirs removed, to become pregnant and have a baby. This is the first time this surgery has taken place in the U.S. In Sweden, nine women have undergone the operation and at least four of those women have given birth.

The Cleveland Clinic said in a statement that the uterus came from a deceased organ donor. The woman who received the transplant will likely have to take anti-rejection medication for a long time to ensure the procedure is a success.

The hospital says it is continuing to screen possible transplant candidates.

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

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Here’s the Best Way to Prevent Blisters

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Whether you’ve walked miles in hiking boots or a new pair of high heels, you know the pain of a blister. “People have been getting blisters as long as we’ve been outside,” says Dr. Grant Lipman, clinical associate professor of emergency medicine at Stanford Medicine.

Experts still disagree on how to prevent them. But in a new study published in the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, Lipman and his colleagues found that the cheapest solution may also be the best: surgical paper tape.

To find out if paper tape really helps stop blisters from forming, Lipman decided to study ultramarathon runners. “Their feet are just getting wrecked,” Lipman says. Blisters are the single most devastating factor affecting an ultramarathon runner’s performance.

In RacingThePlanet, a grueling 155-mile ultramarathon across four deserts, a team of medical assistants followed 128 runners who were carrying their own food and gear. The medical team applied Micropore paper tape—the kind available in drugstores—to blister-prone areas of one foot per runner. The other foot served as a control.

At the end of the race, paper tape reduced blisters by 40%. Only 30 of the taped feet got blisters, while 81 of the untaped feet got blisters. And when taped-up feet did get blisters, they got them much later on in the race.

When a spot on the skin is repeatedly rubbed, the skin layers can separate and fill with fluid, which becomes a blister. The way to prevent them is to make the area of the foot more slippery, which eases friction, Lipman explains. Some methods seem to work, but they come with drawbacks; while antiperspirant does the trick for many people, it also irritates their skin, according to past studies. Fancy adhesive pads and high-tech gels can work, but they’re expensive.

Paper surgical tape not only works, but comes with lots of advantages. “It’s not too adhesive, so it won’t rip the underlying blister’s roof off,” Lipman says. “One roll of this over-the-counter ubiquitous cheap little tape can last for years.”

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

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This New Weight-Loss Device Removes Food From Stomach After Meals

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TUESDAY, June 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) — A new surgically implanted device to treat obese patients has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The AspireAssist device uses a tube to drain a portion of the stomach contents after every meal. It’s meant to be used by people who have been unable to lose weight and maintain weight loss using nonsurgical treatments. The FDA approval is for people 22 and older.

The device is recommended for obese people with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 55, the FDA said. BMI is a rough estimate of body fat based on height and weight measurements. A BMI of 30 or more is considered obese, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The device shouldn’t be used in people with eating disorders. It also isn’t intended for short-term use in moderately overweight people, according to the FDA.

With the AspireAssist, a tube is inserted in the stomach and connected to a port valve placed flush against the skin of the abdomen. About 20 to 30 minutes after each meal, the patient attaches an external connector and tubing to the port valve, opens the valve, and drains some stomach contents into the toilet.

The process takes five to 10 minutes and removes about 30 percent of the calories consumed in the meal, the FDA said.

The approval was based on the results of a clinical trial of 111 patients who used the AspireAssist and a control group of 60 patients who made lifestyle changes only. After one year, patients in the AspireAssist group lost an average of 12 percent of their total body weight. The control group lost an average of less than 4 percent of their weight, researchers said.

“The AspireAssist approach helps provide effective control of calorie absorption, which is a key principle of weight management therapy,” said Dr. William Maisel. He’s the deputy director for science and chief scientist in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

“Patients need to be regularly monitored by their health care provider and should follow a lifestyle program to help them develop healthier eating habits and reduce their calorie intake,” Maisel said in an agency news release.

Side effects associated with use of the AspireAssist include indigestion, nausea, vomiting, constipation and diarrhea. There are also a number of risks associated with the placement of the device, including pain, bleeding, infection, inflammation, accidental puncture of the stomach or intestinal wall, and death, the FDA said.

The device is made by Pennsylvania-based Aspire Bariatrics.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more on weight loss.


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The Best and Worst U.S. States for Your Health 

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How healthy is your state? The United Health Foundation knows: For nearly three decades, the organization has been comparing all 50 states in its annual America's Health Rankings.

This year's report is based on variables in a handful of categories, including behaviors (like smoking and excessive drinking), community and environment (access to clean water, for example, and violent crime rates), policy, clinical care, and health outcomes (such as the number of premature deaths).

The 2016 data revealed some good news, and also some alarming trends. For example, the rate of cardiovascular deaths went up for the first time since the foundation started putting out this report 27 years ago. And the national obesity rate is now 157% greater than it was back in 1990.

But on the bright side, smoking rates across the United States have dropped by an impressive 41% in that same period. And more Americans are insured today than they were five years ago.     

So where should you should move to live your healthiest life possible? Consider Hawaii. The Aloha State snagged first place for the fifth year in a row, thanks in part to its below average obesity rate and low incidence of preventable hospitalizations.

To find out where your home state landed on the list, scroll down. Below are all 50 states, ranked from healthiest to unhealthiest.

RELATED: The 50 Best Bike Rides in American, State by State

  1. Hawaii

  2. Massachusetts

  3. Connecticut

  4. Minnesota

  5. Vermont

  6. New Hampshire

  7. Washington

  8. Utah

  9. New Jersey

  10. Colorado

  11. North Dakota

  12. Nebraska

  13. New York

  14. Rhode Island

  15. Idaho

  16. California

  17. Iowa

  18. Maryland

  19. Virginia

  20. Wisconsin

  21. Oregon

  22. Maine

  23. Montana

  24. South Dakota

  25. Wyoming

  26. Illinois

  27. Kansas

  28. Pennsylvania

  29. Arizona

  30. Alaska

  31. Delaware

  32. North Carolina

  33. Texas

  34. Michigan

  35. Nevada

  36. Florida

  37. Missouri

  38. New Mexico

  39. Indiana

  40. Ohio

  41. Georgia

  42. South Carolina

  43. West Virginia

  44. Tennessee

  45. Kentucky

  46. Oklahoma

  47. Alabama

  48. Arkansas

  49. Louisiana

  50. Mississippi

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