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The Weight Loss Motivation Bible: How To Program Your Mind For Sustainable Fat Loss

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If You Want to Lose Weight, Here's Why You Should Try Matcha

www.popsugar.com/fitness/What-Matcha-36942038

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

Ready to take your morning caffeine habit to the next level? It may be time to replace your loose leaves or cup of coffee with matcha. A powdered form of steamed and dried green tea leaves that has been used in Japanese tea ceremonies for centuries, matcha tastes like a grassier, brighter version of the regular stuff. Think of it as the “healthy espresso of green tea,” say David Mandelbaum and Jessica Lloyd, owners of matcha purveyor Panatea. So just how healthy is the green powder? A study found that one serving of matcha has 137 times more disease-fighting polyphenols, called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), than a brewed mug of conventional China Green Tips — the equivalent of up to 10 cups of regular green tea! With such an antioxidant punch, it’s no wonder that matcha just may be the new superfood. Read on for why it could just be a miracle in a mug.

Weight-loss concentrate: EGCG has been shown in some lab studies to boost metabolism, and other research has shown that EGCG may help stop the growth of new fat cells. While more studies are still needed to confirm results in humans, add to this the fact that drinking green tea instead of sugary drinks can help you save calories, and opting for a healthy matcha-based drink (like this lower-calorie version of Starbucks’s green tea latte) may just be a wise weight-loss decision.

Disease-fighter: The concentrated levels of antioxidants in matcha are hard to beat, especially considering catechins in green tea have been shown to have cancer-preventing as well as immunity-boosting effects, including helping prevent high-risk health workers from catching the flu.

Daily detox: Matcha may just help keep your body functioning in tip-top shape; a lab study in rats with type 2 diabetes found that a daily dose of matcha provided a protective effect on their liver and kidney systems. Other research has found that green tea drinkers had a 33 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes by helping reduce blood glucose levels — the more green tea they drank, the lower the risk.

Jitter-free energy: A serving of matcha has less caffeine than an espresso, but its nutrient makeup just may give you more energy. Because the tea leaves used to make matcha are protected from sunlight before being harvested and steamed, the leaves retain much of their natural chlorophyll (which is why matcha is so green), a substance that has been shown to help boost energy. Plus, green tea is an excellent source of the mind-calming amino acid L-theanine, which means you may just feel more awake and alert without the late-afternoon caffeine crash.

When buying matcha, be sure and check each product so you know you’re buying high-quality tea with the most health benefits. “The more vibrantly green the matcha is, the higher the chlorophyll and amino acid content,” David and Jessica advise. Also, check labels and watch out for additives and sugars, which some matcha products contain. For the perfect cup, David and Jessica recommend heating water until near boiling (180°F) and whisking in matcha powder in a “M” or “W” motion.

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If You Want to Lose Weight, Here's Why You Should Try Matcha

www.popsugar.com/fitness/What-Matcha-36942038

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

Ready to take your morning caffeine habit to the next level? It may be time to replace your loose leaves or cup of coffee with matcha. A powdered form of steamed and dried green tea leaves that has been used in Japanese tea ceremonies for centuries, matcha tastes like a grassier, brighter version of the regular stuff. Think of it as the “healthy espresso of green tea,” say David Mandelbaum and Jessica Lloyd, owners of matcha purveyor Panatea. So just how healthy is the green powder? A study found that one serving of matcha has 137 times more disease-fighting polyphenols, called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), than a brewed mug of conventional China Green Tips — the equivalent of up to 10 cups of regular green tea! With such an antioxidant punch, it’s no wonder that matcha just may be the new superfood. Read on for why it could just be a miracle in a mug.

Weight-loss concentrate: EGCG has been shown in some lab studies to boost metabolism, and other research has shown that EGCG may help stop the growth of new fat cells. While more studies are still needed to confirm results in humans, add to this the fact that drinking green tea instead of sugary drinks can help you save calories, and opting for a healthy matcha-based drink (like this lower-calorie version of Starbucks’s green tea latte) may just be a wise weight-loss decision.

Disease-fighter: The concentrated levels of antioxidants in matcha are hard to beat, especially considering catechins in green tea have been shown to have cancer-preventing as well as immunity-boosting effects, including helping prevent high-risk health workers from catching the flu.

Daily detox: Matcha may just help keep your body functioning in tip-top shape; a lab study in rats with type 2 diabetes found that a daily dose of matcha provided a protective effect on their liver and kidney systems. Other research has found that green tea drinkers had a 33 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes by helping reduce blood glucose levels — the more green tea they drank, the lower the risk.

Jitter-free energy: A serving of matcha has less caffeine than an espresso, but its nutrient makeup just may give you more energy. Because the tea leaves used to make matcha are protected from sunlight before being harvested and steamed, the leaves retain much of their natural chlorophyll (which is why matcha is so green), a substance that has been shown to help boost energy. Plus, green tea is an excellent source of the mind-calming amino acid L-theanine, which means you may just feel more awake and alert without the late-afternoon caffeine crash.

When buying matcha, be sure and check each product so you know you’re buying high-quality tea with the most health benefits. “The more vibrantly green the matcha is, the higher the chlorophyll and amino acid content,” David and Jessica advise. Also, check labels and watch out for additives and sugars, which some matcha products contain. For the perfect cup, David and Jessica recommend heating water until near boiling (180°F) and whisking in matcha powder in a “M” or “W” motion.

25909806,36896809,24559867

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When You Cry At Work, This Is What Happens

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If you’re a baby, bursting into a puddle of tears (in public or in private) helps you get what you want. But if you’re a grown-up, crying at work will only get you left behind, a new study suggests.

In a series of three experiments, published in the British Journal of Social Psychology, researchers asked about 1,000 people their impression of a person in a photograph. In one photo, the person had visible tears on their cheek—making it obvious that they were crying—or showed no tears, because they’d been digitally removed. The presence of a tear made all the difference; people perceived the tearful person as sadder, warmer—but also less competent—than the very same person when the tears had been edited out. People looking at the photos said they were more likely to approach a tearful person to offer help than one without tears.

But in another experiment in the study, people were shown the photographs and asked a different question: “If you would arrive at work, and your manager asks you to finish an important project that afternoon, would you like to do that with this person?”

People in the study said they wanted to approach the woman in the photo to see if they could help, but weren’t too eager to work with her on a big project. “It seems that people who cry are seen as less competent persons in general,” says Niels van de Ven, associate professor in marketing at Tilburg University in the Netherlands and one of the authors of the study. “We did not give reasons about why people were crying, but still, it reflects badly on their perceived competence.”

Why adults cry has been a mystery to scientists for centuries, as TIME recently reported. One prominent theory is that crying signals to others an inability to cope with something happening at that moment, and tears trigger bystanders’ desire to help. Several studies, including this one, have shown that tears do compel people to approach someone who’s crying. But the new work shows that the effects of those tears are not all positive and may depend on context. “Work is definitely a place where crying seems to be not really appreciated,” van de Ven says. “Work is a setting where typically everything is about competence.”

Thankfully, though, the office is not the most popular spot to cry. In one comprehensive survey, 74% of people said the last place they cried was at home, while only 6% reported crying at work or school. Wondering how your crying habits measure up to the those of your colleagues? Take our quiz to find out what kind of crier you are.

 

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

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Why You Should Be 'Womanspreading'

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One of Donald Trump’s most effective attacks on Hillary Clinton is ridiculing her voice. Campaigning in California recently, the candidate said he “can’t stand her screaming all the time,” wincing and covering his ears to illustrate his point. The imitation draws big laughs from Trump’s crowd, but for many women it’s just one more reminder of a persistent double standard: While men can raise their voices at will, women who do the same are “grating” or “shrill.”

Yet new data suggest that there may a way for women to short circuit this sexist perception. Writing in the Wall Street Journal, a researcher from Emory’s Goizueta Business School explained how she and a colleague from Stanford’s Graduate School of Business synthesized 71 studies looking at reactions to assertive behavior. As you might expect, they found that women were penalized for “direct, explicit forms of assertiveness, such as negotiating for a higher salary or asking a neighbor to turn down the music.”

But here’s the surprising thing: The researchers found that women were not dinged for “nonverbal” assertiveness. In other words, they could use expansive body positions—think throwing an arm over the next chair—or putting themselves in close physical proximity to their audience. Similarly, there was no gender-based penalty for “paraverbal cues,” such as speaking loudly or even interrupting.

Their conclusion: Women can use the confident body language that men and women have come to expect from leaders without fear of being judged more harshly than their male counterparts. While acknowledging that using a strong speaking style without using strong words still puts women at a disadvantage, the researchers asserted that nonverbal dominance can be, at the very least, “a side door to achieving influence.”

Now, some women might read this and sigh, “Oh, great..so we have to use SIGN language to get what we want.” However, I see these findings as a real positive. As a communication coach, my work with female execs has proven the value body language—and how the right postures can help them use stronger language effectively. For instance, people are less receptive to women when they frown, so adjusting to a more neutral—but still serious face—will help you get your message across, even when your message is something something people may not want to hear. The same goes for moderating a high pitched voice. Women who become defensive and react fiercely to criticism of them or their teams are often dinged for failing to “show grace under fire,” the most prized of all leadership behaviors. Again, strategies such as pausing before firing back, maintaining a calm but serious face, and responding in low tone paves the way to use assertive language.

When faced with the need to change their communication, both women and men tend to push back, concerned about losing authenticity. But experts say leadership requires constant evolution and adaptation. In a recent HBR article, Herminia Ibarra at INSEAD said, “The only way we grow as leaders is by stretching the limits of who we are.”

Consider Hillary Clinton, who has noticeably changed her tone. Of her recent, and widely praised, speech attacking Trump, the New York Times wrote, “Speaking in a steady, modulated tone but lobbing some of the most fiery lines of her presidential campaign, Mrs. Clinton painted Mr. Trump as a reckless, childish and uninformed amateur who was playing at the game of global statecraft.” She wasn’t loud, but her words hit the mark.

In my view, the path forward for women is two-fold. Yes, we must sometimes adjust our style to account for centuries of male leadership. But we can simultaneously widen that path and make it our own. Think of Sheryl Sandberg and her trademark stilettos. Her style may be a far cry from her famously t-shirted boss, but she’s every bit as powerful.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com.

 

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