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Baked Eggs in Bread Bowls

4 EASY MOVES TO MELT AWAY YOUR MUFFIN TOP FOR GOOD! | Fitness For Health Source by dailyhealthpost

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Sugary Drinks and 'Bad' Carbs May Increase Risk of These Types of Cancer

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By Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) — People who consume a lot of processed carbohydrates—think snack foods and sweets—and sugary drinks may face heightened risks of breast and prostate cancers, a new study suggests.

Researchers said the study, reported Tuesday at the American Society for Nutrition annual meeting in San Diego, does not prove that “bad” carbs cause cancer.

But given that breast and prostate cancers are two of the most common cancers in the United States, the connection gives more reason for people to cut processed foods from their diets, said lead researcher Nour Makarem.

“The carbohydrate quality of your diet matters for a number of reasons,” said Makarem, a Ph.D. candidate in nutrition at New York University.

In general, health experts already recommend limiting sugary drinks and processed carbohydrates, and eating more fruits, vegetables, legumes, fiber-rich whole grains, and “good” unsaturated fats.

So the new findings—considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal—add more weight to that advice, Makarem said.

She pointed, in particular, to the link her team found between sugar-sweetened drinks (both soda and fruit juice) and prostate cancer risk. Compared with men who never drank sugary beverages, those who had them a few times a week showed more than triple the risk of developing prostate cancer.

And that was with other factors—including obesity, smoking, and other diet habits—taken into account, Makarem said.

Still, it is difficult to weed out the effects of particular diet habits on cancer risk, said Marji McCullough, strategic director of nutritional epidemiology for the American Cancer Society.

“Few dietary factors apart from alcohol and/or obesity have been consistently related to postmenopausal breast cancer and prostate cancer,” McCullough said.

The question of whether carbohydrate quality affects cancer risk—independent of obesity—is important, according to McCullough. But it’s also a “challenging” one to answer, she said.

The new findings are based on nearly 3,200 U.S. adults whose diet habits and cancer rates were tracked for more than 20 years. During that time, 565 people were diagnosed with cancer.

At first glance, higher carb intake was tied to a lower risk of breast cancer. But the picture changed when carb quality was considered, Makarem noted.

She said that women whose diets emphasized healthy carbs—vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and legumes—were 67 percent less likely to develop breast cancer, compared to women who favored refined carbs. Refined carbs include many baked goods, white bread and white potatoes.

When it came to prostate cancer risk, men who regularly drank sugary juices or soda were more than three times as likely to develop disease versus men who steered clear of those drinks, the findings showed.

That does not prove sweet drinks directly contribute to prostate cancer, Makarem acknowledged. Still, she said, many studies have implicated the beverages in the risks of obesity and type 2 diabetes—so there are other reasons to cut back.

“Plus,” Makarem said, “it’s an easy change to make in your diet.”

The American Beverage Association took issue with the findings.

“The authors of this study abstract acknowledge their findings do not show that beverages cause any disease,” the group said in a statement. “Moreover, the study was limited to one demographic group that is not reflective of the population of the United States.” (Most study participants were white.)

The beverage association also said that the American Cancer Society cites multiple potential risk factors for breast, prostate and colon cancer, so singling out diet is difficult. The group also said that because the study hasn’t been published in a peer-reviewed journal, “very few study details are available” and it’s therefore tough to draw firm conclusions.

Sugary drinks weren’t the only diet factor that mattered, though, according to the researchers. Prostate cancer risk was also heightened among men whose diets were generally high in “glycemic load”—which, Makarem said, basically means they ate a lot of refined carbs.

The study also implicated “processed lunch foods,” including pizza, deli meats, and burgers. Men who ate those foods four or more times a week were twice as likely to develop prostate cancer, compared to men who had them no more than once a week, the researchers found.

According to McCullough, it’s hard to know whether certain foods, per se, contribute to breast or prostate cancers—or whether, for example, it’s overall calorie intake and weight gain that are the true culprits.

But the bottom line, Makarem said, is that whole, “high-quality” foods are a generally healthier choice than processed ones.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more on diet and cancer risk.


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The 1 Change I Made to Cure 10 Years of Feeling Bloated

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Entering college was supposed to be all bliss and excitement, but I had such terrible digestive issues, I wouldn’t dare stray far from my dorm bathroom. It was so embarrassing, feeling so bloated and being so gassy, the only person I could confide in was, of course, my mother. In her thick Long Island, NY, accent she said, “Aww, yaw just nervous. You’ll feel bettah soon.”

But months later, nothing had changed. I felt happier at college than I’d ever felt in my entire life and I was far from nervous. I still felt like sh*t, though. As a vegetarian who lived on cheese, I was lactose intolerant in a major way, so giving up dairy helped. I even gave up gluten but pretty much felt the same — tired and bloated. Every time I ate, I had digestive pains. Plus, I thought being a gluten-free vegetarian would help me drop my college weight gain, but I was actually gaining more weight.

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Why? Gluten-free baked goods, breads, pastas, and vegan ice cream and cookies were part of my daily diet, so no wonder the scale numbers were going up. And even after giving up gluten for 10 years, my stomach was still a bloated mess. It wasn’t until I ditched the processed junk and started eating more salads, roasted veggies, soups, beans, whole grains, and fruits that I noticed the enormous difference I had been hoping for. I felt energized and lighter, and, most importantly, I had no more belly bloat. I mean NONE. I even started introducing a little gluten back into my diet and still felt amazing.

The cure? Fiber. I wasn’t eating close to enough on my junk-food gluten-free, vegetarian diet. I started focusing on getting at least 25 to 30 grams a day, which worked out to at least eight grams at each meal and three to four grams for each of my two snacks. To ensure I get my fill, I add ground flaxseed and berries to my smoothies and baked goods, chia seeds to my overnight oats, use avocado when I make pesto pasta, and add beans, quinoa, and sunflower seeds to my salads.

I was not only free from the chains of feeling bloated, but eating more fiber filled me up and I wasn’t nearly as hungry as I had been, which helped me eat fewer daily calories, and in, turn lose weight. Talk about a major win-win, people!

American diets tend to focus on getting more protein and eating fewer carbs, so if you find that you’re feeling bloated, gassy, and you can’t remember the last time you pooped, check your fiber intake! As a general rule of thumb, make sure to get fiber every time you eat, whether it’s through veggies, fruits, nuts and seeds, or whole grains. If you need some meal and snack inspiration, check out these recipes:

High-Fiber Breakfast Ideas
Fiber-Filled Smoothies
Top 10 High-Fiber Foods
High-Fiber Snacks
High-Fiber Fruits

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You've Never Laughed This Hard About Thigh Gaps Before

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Meet Luisa Omielan and remember her name, because when you’re feeling down about your jeans feeling a little snug or inhaling that entire batch of brownies you just baked, you’ll want to watch this video over and over again. This London comedian preaching the truth about body image, Beyoncé, and thigh gaps is all too real — you’ll totally relate. And the end is the absolute best part! Just note that there’s a little language that’s NSFW.

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Self-saucing chocolate mini cakes recipe

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This baked treat combines the gooey, melty experience of Crème Eggs with the satisfying cakeyness of muffins while keeping macros in check. 

 

Ingredients (Makes 8)

  • 1 scoop chocolate protein powder
  • 2 tbsp cocoa powder
  • ½ cup coconut flour
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ¼ cup coconut sugar
  • ½ cup light coconut milk or almond milk 
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 piece Cadbury Snack (from family block) per cake

Method

Combine all dry ingredients and slowly fold in wet ingredients. Preheat oven to 175°C. Pre-spray baking sheet and line tins (a mini muffin tin is ideal). Pour in mixture and place in oven for 10 minutes. At 10-minute mark, stuff each cake with one piece of Cadbury filled chocolate (e.g. a strawberry or pineapple piece of Snack). Place in oven for another eight to 10 minutes. As soon as cakes are done, place in freezer for five minutes and serve. Store remaining cakes in fridge or container and microwave to melt centres for serving.

Nutrition info (per cake)

 

Without chocolate piece: 428 kJ // 3 g fat // 9 g carb // 7 g protein 

With chocolate piece: 590 kJ // 5 g fat // 14 g carb // 7 g protein  

 

Based on recipe by Heidi Cannon. For more low-carb, high-protein treats visit Heidi Boom Boom.

 

Try these sweet potato cupcakes with peanut butter frosting for another treat. 

 

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Self-saucing chocolate mini cakes recipe

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The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

 

 

This baked treat combines the gooey, melty experience of Crème Eggs with the satisfying cakeyness of muffins while keeping macros in check. 

Ingredients (Makes 8)

  • 1 scoop chocolate protein powder
  • 2 tbsp cocoa powder
  • ½ cup coconut flour
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ¼ cup coconut sugar
  • ½ cup light coconut milk or almond milk 
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 piece Cadbury Snack (from family block) per cake

Method

Combine all dry ingredients and slowly fold in wet ingredients. Preheat oven to 175°C. Pre-spray baking sheet and line tins (a mini muffin tin is ideal). Pour in mixture and place in oven for 10 minutes. At 10-minute mark, stuff each cake with one piece of Cadbury filled chocolate (e.g. a strawberry or pineapple piece of Snack). Place in oven for another eight to 10 minutes. As soon as cakes are done, place in freezer for five minutes and serve. Store remaining cakes in fridge or container and microwave to melt centres for serving.

Nutrition info (per cake)

Without chocolate piece: 428 kJ // 3 g fat // 9 g carb // 7 g protein 

With chocolate piece: 590 kJ // 5 g fat // 14 g carb // 7 g protein  

Based on recipe by Heidi Cannon. For more low-carb, high-protein treats visit Heidi Boom Boom.

Try these sweet potato cupcakes with peanut butter frosting for another treat. 

 

{nomultithumb}

 

Read more …

Also check out healthywithjodi.com

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Everything You Need to Know About Baking With Coconut Oil

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Uses for coconut oil are popping up everywhere these days, like in the kitchen for high-heat searing but also as a beauty aid for smoothing split ends. Hey, why not? Just one whiff of the stuff whisks you away to a tropical beach — piña colada in hand. But why on earth would anyone want to use coconut oil for baking? Here’s a short list:

It’s vegan.
It’s a lot healthier for your heart than butter, shortening, and many other oils.
Its flavor and mouthfeel are melt-in-your-mouth magical — after all, isn’t that the point of indulging in baked goods in the first place?

Ready to bake with it? Read on for answers to all your questions about baking with coconut oil.

Can I really substitute coconut oil for butter?
You bet. “Because coconut oil is solid at room temperature (it melts at 74 degrees), it is the closest oil there is to butter in terms of how it works in a recipe,” said Vegetarian Times food editor Mary Margaret Chappell.

Should I substitute coconut oil for butter or other oils at a 1:1 ratio?
Yes. If you are subbing for butter or shortening, use it as a solid at room temperature. If you are subbing for oil, simply melt it on the stovetop or in a microwave. Note: it melts super fast!

Which baked goods work best with coconut oil — and why?
Coconut oil works wonderfully in cakes, brownies, cookies, pie crusts, breads, crumbles, and frosting — especially those with tropical, chocolaty, or fresh and citrusy flavors. “I reach for coconut oil mainly when I’m making pie crusts and frostings,” said Chappell. “You can cream coconut oil with sugar at the start of a cake recipe and beat it into frostings.” Her absolute favorite use: in homemade chocolates! “A little coconut oil gives them a shine and a firmer texture than straight chocolate.”

How does it affect the flavor of baked goods?
“Unrefined coconut oil has a definite coconut flavor, which can come through in baked goods,” said Chappell. While that can be a very good thing, if that’s not the flavor you’re looking for, Chappell suggests choosing refined coconut oil.

Is coconut oil healthier than other fats?
While coconut oil is a saturated fat, we like to think of it as a “good fat.” Why? Unlike the typical saturated fat found in animal products (long-chain fatty acids), the plant-based saturated fat in coconut oil (medium-chain fatty acids) is more readily burned as energy rather than stored as fat. Plus, it’s free of the scary trans fat found in most shortenings and margarines, and it’s super high in lauric acid, which is both antiviral and immunity-boosting.

Does it work for greasing the pan instead of nonstick cooking spray?
Yup. You can either use a pastry brush or a clean paper towel to grease the pan with coconut oil, or give coconut oil nonstick cooking spray a try. We heart Spectrum Naturals Coconut Spray Oil or Trader Joe’s Coconut Oil Spray.

Are there any helpful cookbooks to help me get started baking with coconut oil?
We love these two:
BabyCakes: Vegan, (Mostly) Gluten-Free, and (Mostly) Sugar-Free Recipes From New York’s Most Talked-About Bakery
The Complete Guide to Vegan Food Substitutions

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Become a Healthy Baker With These Surprising Butter Substitutes

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Baking calms the mind and feeds the soul, but all that buttery goodness can pack on the pounds. If you’re looking to make healthier baked goods, omitting some or all of the butter from your favorite recipes can greatly reduce the calories, fat, and cholesterol. There are countless ways to replace eggs in recipes, and here are healthier alternatives to using butter (great for vegan bakers, too).

Applesauce: Often used to replace oil in recipes, applesauce can also be used as a butter alternative, and it works best in cake-like recipes (like this vegan banana apple chunk bread). Replace half the amount of butter in your recipe with applesauce; if the recipe calls for one cup of butter, use half a cup of butter and half a cup of applesauce. If you don’t mind a denser, more moist bread, replace all the butter with applesauce to cut even more calories and fat.
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Avocado: Substitute half the amount of butter in a baking recipe with mashed avocado (it works well with cookies and quick breads like these pumpkin apple muffins); use the same method as you would when using applesauce. Using avocado not only lowers the calorie content, but also creates a softer, moister baked good, and is perfect if you want to omit the dairy. You can also use avocado in place of butter to make vegan “buttercream” frosting.
Earth Balance: Replace all the butter with Earth Balance to reduce saturated fat and cholesterol. Using Smart Balance rather than Earth Balance will also save some calories, and note that Original Smart Balance is now dairy-free!
Canola oil: In certain recipes, replacing butter with oil works well, especially if the recipe calls for melted butter. Fiddle with your favorite recipes to figure out when canola works instead of butter; when baking chocolate chip cookies, I’ve had success substituting half a cup of canola oil for half a cup of unsalted butter. Although slightly higher in calories, canola is much lower in saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium.

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Greek yogurt: Replace half the amount of butter in your cookie recipes with half the amount of full-fat plain Greek yogurt. For example, if the recipe calls for one cup of butter, use half a cup of butter and one quarter cup of yogurt. You’ll reduce the calories and the saturated fat. Play around with using more yogurt and less butter to see if you still like the taste and consistency. Here are more ways to use Greek yogurt in baking recipes. If you’re avoiding dairy, use soy yogurt instead, like this recipe for protein banana bread.
Prune purée: Often used to help little ones stay regular, prune purée also makes a low-calorie and low-fat alternative to butter. Whatever amount of butter the recipe calls for, replace it completely with store-bought baby food prune purée (unless you have time to make your own; just purée prunes in the food processor). This option works well in recipes that involve chocolate and cinnamon.

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Organic Food Recipes Uncategorized 

Orange-Sesame Shrimp Salad

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Orange-Sesame Shrimp Salad Recipe
Orange-Sesame Shrimp Salad
In this healthy Asian-inspired shrimp salad recipe, two types of greens—romaine lettuce and red cabbage—pair beautifully with the avocado and shrimp. Use extra dressing for another salad or as a sauce for baked fish.


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Beef Chimichangas

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Beef Chimichangas Recipe
Beef Chimichangas
To slash 150 calories in this healthy chimichanga recipe, we bake rather than fry and use less beef by stretching the filling with mushrooms and beans. Top the baked chimichangas with fresh salsa (found near other refrigerated dips and sauces) instead of jarred salsa to save on sodium.

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