Browse By

Daily Archives: December 15, 2016

No Thumbnail

FDA Issues New Guidelines to Reduce Sodium in Processed Foods

http://www.judgeweightloss.com/bikinibutt

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants the food industry to cut back on the salt.

In draft voluntary guidelines issued Wednesday, the agency set both two-year and 10-year goals for lower sodium content in hundreds of processed and prepared foods. The aim is to reduce the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke among Americans, according to the FDA.

“Many Americans want to reduce sodium in their diets, but that’s hard to do when much of it is in everyday products we buy in stores and restaurants,” Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell said in an FDA statement.

“Today’s announcement is about putting power back in the hands of consumers, so that they can better control how much salt is in the food they eat and improve their health,” she added.

Americans’ average salt intake is about 3,400 milligrams (mg) a day, which is nearly 50 percent more than what experts recommend. High salt intake increases the risk of high blood pressure (“hypertension”), heart disease and stroke.

The voluntary targets are meant to reduce Americans’ daily salt intake to 3,000 mg in two years and 2,300 mg in the next decade, according to the FDA. The guidelines cover a wide swath of foods, from bread to cold cuts, cereals, and snacks.

Some studies have estimated that lowering salt intake by about 40 percent over the next decade could save 500,000 lives and nearly $100 billion in health care costs in the United States.

“The totality of the scientific evidence supports sodium reduction from current intake levels,” said Susan Mayne, director of the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.

“Experts at the Institute of Medicine have concluded that reducing sodium intake to 2,300 mg per day can significantly help Americans reduce their blood pressure, and ultimately prevent hundreds of thousands of premature illnesses and deaths,” Mayne said.

“Because the majority of sodium in our diets comes from processed and prepared foods, consumers are challenged in lowering their sodium intake themselves,” Mayne added.

The draft guidelines, which are open for public comment ranging from 90 days to 150 days, were welcomed by American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown.

“The American Heart Association strongly supports the draft voluntary sodium targets released today by the FDA, and we call upon the agency to finalize them as soon as possible,” Brown said in a statement.

“These new targets will spark a vital, healthy change in our food supply, a change consumers say they want. These voluntary targets can have a significant impact on the nation’s health,” she added.

“Lowering sodium levels in the food supply could eliminate about 1.5 million cases of uncontrolled hypertension and save billions of dollars in health care costs over the next decade,” Brown suggested.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration outlines how to reduce salt in your diet.


Also check out http://healthywithjodi.com

No Thumbnail

18 Nutrition and Fitness Experts Reveal Their New Year's Resolutions

http://www.judgeweightloss.com/sixpackabs

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

Eat better, join a gym, drink more water, get eight hours of sleep every night…many of the most popular New Year's resolutions are focused on living a healthier, more balanced life. But what do those people who are already extremely healthy (in fact, it's their job to be) want to improve upon? We polled 18 wellness influencers, from nutritionists to celebrity trainers to healthy start-up founders, to find out what their self-improvement goals are for the upcoming year. From being more mindful to carving out time for themselves to working out a little less (if only we all had that problem), here are their resolutions for 2017.

RELATED: 21 New Year's Resolutions You'll Actually Keep

Embrace mindfulness and live in the now

"Be even more mindful with the words I use, making sure they are influential in a positive, hopeful, and inspiring way; not just for the clients I train, but for everyone I interact with, including myself." 
—Tanya Becker, co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of Physique57

"Furthering my meditation practice. I find that mindfulness not only allows me to react more calmly in stressful situations, but it also helps me feel happier overall and more in the moment, whether I’m eating, being active, or spending time with my hubby and pets."
Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, Health's contributing nutrition editor

"I resolve to listen closer, breathe deeper, and be more present. I hope to think less and risk more. And while focusing on all these things, I hope to empower others to do the same. I'm very excited for 2017!"
—Olivia Young, founder of box + flow

"My New Year's resolution is to commit—to be more instinctual and trust my gut. To work harder, and to live in the now."
—Derek DeGrazio, celebrity trainer and managing partner at Barry's Bootcamp Miami

RELATED: 13 New Year's Resolutions You Shouldn't Make

Pay it forward

"My New Year's resolution is to advocate on more result-oriented ways and less social ways to educate and support people's lives. This is an important year in health and I feel a strong commitment to providing people tools that help them invest in their health and their futures. I feel that the trends in fitness will be taking a backseat to people wanting life-long solutions that pay it forward in a really meaningful way."
—Tracy Anderson, Health contributing fitness editor, celebrity fitness trainer, and founder of the Tracy Anderson Method

"To do a random act of kindness every day. [It] forces you to think about how you can be more compassionate all day, so you can realize the perfect moment to act on it."
—Danielle DuBoise, co-founder of SAKARA LIFE

Carve out more personal time

"I want to make sure to spend more quality time with my closest friends and call my mom and sister more often. I’m going to work on improving my cooking skills. Professionally, I’m going to hire an assistant. And physically, I’m going to take more rest days. I’m on my feet working six out of seven days a week. I’d like to change that to five days a week." 
—Lacey Stone, celebrity trainer and founder of Lacey Stone Fitness

"Put more 'me' time on the calendar. It can be difficult to manage the work/life balance when you own a business because you're emotionally invested. This year, I'm going to make more of an effort to put the computer away and take time for myself."
—Tracy Carlinsky, founder of Brooklyn Bodyburn

"I am so busy and pulled in so many directions—single parent to twin girls, business owner—I don't take enough time to decompress. I know doing so will make me more grounded, balanced, and ultimately more productive."
—David Kirsch, celebrity fitness and wellness expert

RELATED: 28 New Year's Resolutions to Look and Feel Better

Schedule in restorative workouts

"Take it down a notch! As a fitness pro, I often push myself as hard as possible in every. single. workout, choosing the most advanced poses or sequences. Movement is my 'drug of choice' and I'm working on sometimes allowing that movement to be peaceful or restorative rather than only the most intense."
—Amy Jordan, founder and CEO of WundaBar Pilates

"Being an athletespecifically a boxer and a runnermy body is always tight, and I often don't take much time to stretch and recover, as I'm in a go-go-go mentality. I want to try out new yoga classes a few times a week and get into my own stretching routine so I can feel better doing what I love."
—Ashley Guarrasi, founding trainer of Rumble Boxing

Stress less

"Learn to only focus on controlling the things I can control. Too often we stress about things we really can't control, and it just makes us put unnecessary worry and pressure on ourselves."
—Skylar Diggins, Dallas Wings guard 

Fuel up the right way

"Be more mindful of how I'm fueling my body. Being 38 years old, it's getting harder to bounce back from eating badly consecutive days in a row. My goal is to incorporate a more Paleo-based way of eating, with lots of chicken and fish!"
—Alonzo Wilson, founder of Tone House

"Most resolutions focus on things to cut out. Here's what I plan to add more of in 2017: more colorful veggies on half of my plate, more outdoor workouts, and more books (for fun!)."
—Erika Horowitz MS, RDN

"I like to set my New Year's resolution to be realistic and achievable, so my nutrition plan is based on the 80/20 rule: stick to the Ketogenic diet six days a week, and one day a week splurge with my cheat food of choice (rhymes with "rasta")."
—Ross Franklin, CEO and founder of PureGreen Cold Pressed Juice

RELATED: 57 Ways to Lose Weight Forever, According to Science

Take a risk and try new things

"Trying new sports and workout classes. I want to break out of my comfort zone a bit more! I've never been rock climbing or snow skiing, so I'd like to try those. I would also like to make more of an effort to prioritize recovery. I work out hard and throw around some pretty heavy weights. Somewhere along the line I've started to skimp on stretching, foam rolling, and resting. Not okay!"
—Melody Scharff, instructor at the Fhitting Room

"I'm going to find a better balance between my strength training, mobility, and Jiu Jitsu. I tend to hyper focus on one type of training and my body needs the variety to perform and feel optimal. I'm committed to sitting down before the new year and re-structuring my schedule to reach my goals. If you don't plan, it won't happen!"
—Ashley Borden, celebrity fitness trainer

"Although I work out (and I'm lucky to LOVE working out), my exercise was all over the place in 2016 and I want to take it up a notch in 2017. This includes getting in a few races, planning a few hiking trips, and being consistent with four intense workouts a week."
—Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, and founder of Nutritious Life and the Nutrition School

Also check out http://healthywithjodi.com

No Thumbnail

The First Real Proof That Your Outlook Affects Longevity

http://www.judgeweightloss.com

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

There’s plenty of data supporting the connection between a positive outlook and a healthier life—being optimistic can help you fend off stress, eat better and be more physically active, all of which can lower your risk of chronic illnesses.

But despite how often it’s repeated, doctors haven’t been able to definitively tell you that a positive attitude will help you live longer, mainly because most studies on the subject haven’t followed people over long enough periods of time. Studies to date tend to ask people about their outlook at one specific time—and the response can be affected by a number of transient events.

So researchers led by Andrew Steptoe at University College of London decided to look at a long-term study to track how people’s outlook over time affected their longevity. In a report published in BMJ, he studied nearly 10,000 men and women in the English Longitudinal Study of Aging between 2002 and 2013.

During that time, the middle-aged volunteers were asked three times to assess their outlook by answering four questions that evaluated how they enjoyed the things they did: being with other people, their lives overall, and how energetic they felt. Nearly seven years after their last answers, people who reported more enjoyment (or the highest satisfaction scores on all three occasions) were 24% less likely to have died than people who reported no enjoyment. Those who said they were happy on two of the occasions had a 17% lower mortality.

"The longer people are in a positive state, the better it probably is as far as their health is concerned,” says Steptoe. “This adds weight to the evidence that outlook might be relevant to health.”

Of course, there are many aspects of one’s outlook—mood, or how happy or sad a person feels is one, as is a broader sense of satisfaction. In past studies, says Steptoe, most researchers captured the mood element, but weren’t able to incorporate the larger sense of satisfaction or well-being. “An emotional state is distinct from finding life satisfying,” he says. “And it’s distinct from having a fulfilled life. The criticism of past studies is that it just looked at the pleasure aspect. So what we are trying to do is to use a measure that cuts across different distinctions.” The four-questions in the study, he says, were designed to do just that.

And how did the people who reported more satisfaction and enjoyment achieve that state of well-being? Previous studies have pointed to things such as good mental health and social connections. Steptoe says that keeping up friendships and maintaining social interactions can be an important part of a satisfying life, particularly for older people. “Once you enter middle and older ages, investment is social relationships is crucial,” he says. “It’s something that is quite easy to forget about. When things are going well, you don’t make so much of an effort to maintain friendships. But in many ways it’s an investment in the future as well as the present."

 

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

Also check out http://healthywithjodi.com

No Thumbnail

This Is the Year I'm Actually Going to Run a Marathon

http://www.popsugar.com/fitness/How-Run-Your-First-Marathon-42855054

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

This is the year I’m actually going to run a marathon. There. I said it! In fact, it’s one of my New Year’s resolutions. It was last year’s, too . . . but I chickened out. Now, before all you millions and billions of strangers (hey, guys!), I’m claiming it: I WILL run a marathon in 2017.

And now that I’ve said it, I can admit that I’m completely terrified. Though I ran my first five half marathons in less than two years, this is a big, lofty, scary goal for me. Instead of leaving one huge, daunting goal looming in the distance of 2017, I decided to give myself more actionable objectives to better structure my year for success (hello, I’m an A-type, nice to meet you).

And I know it might seem like I’m a fitness editor, and that this is no big deal since I work out literally every day, but please keep in mind that in 2014, I couldn’t run a mile in under 15 minutes without stopping to take several breaks. I’ve proven myself wrong before, broken down walls internally, and surprised myself in ways I never could’ve dreamed of — and if I can do it, anyone can do it!

41095855

Are you thinking of taking on this big challenge in 2017? Let’s do it together! Here are some benchmarks I’m giving myself to set myself up for my first big 26.2 . . . and all the miles leading up to it.

Buy the damn bib. Step one of making sure I don’t back out of something: spend a lot of money. How else do you think I get up at 6 a.m. for SoulCycle? I can’t lose $32! Once you commit financially, you’ll be less likely to back out. I have my sights set on the Big Apple, so I’ll most likely be signing up for a Team in Training to get myself a spot in the race.
Get a second opinion . . . on shoes. Earlier this year I went on a run with Nike running coach Blue Benadum (he’s run almost 60 marathons!). And although I’ve done some shoe fittings that indicated I need more of a stability shoe, he analyzed my mid- to forefoot strike and told me I was wearing too much cushion in the heel. Apparently it’s time for a reevaluation! Ultramarathoner and coach Robin Arzon also emphasized to me the importance of choosing the right shoe, so I’ll be going through several fittings. Checking this off my list will help me feel more prepared and secure in my decision.
Schedule out other races this year. One way to make this race less scary is to schedule a handful of longer races and half marathons before the date of my full marathon. I’m already registered for a 10.6 miler at the Big Sur International Marathon (yay for checking things off my list of goals!), and I’m hoping to do a Disney half marathon at some point, too. Although these will still be HUGE victories and major goals for me (it’s still a lot of miles!), compared to the big race, they’ll be my mini victories along the way — or as Robin Arzon calls them, “micro successes.
Commit to cross-training. This race isn’t just about running — I want to make sure my body is strong enough and my endurance is *all the way up* so that I don’t feel destroyed at the end of this thing. I especially need to focus on my leg strength, as I have some run-induced patella inflammation that could potentially sideline me. Physical therapy, leg day, and foam rolling will be of the utmost importance this year.
Don’t wait for a certain date to start training. I talked with 11-time Ironman finisher and coach Marni Sumbal about this new adventure I’m embarking on, and this was her advice: don’t wait, start now. “Think of every day between now and your future half marathon as available time to get stronger and improve your endurance.” It made so much sense — waiting to start training is like procrastinating on a project you’re afraid of. I’ve already started running a little bit more than usual to get 2017 off on the right foot.
Choose the right training program. Although I plan on starting my training nearly a year in advance of my marathon, you can bet I’ll be following a strict beginner marathon training program about five months out. Commitment to this program is a goal within a goal.
Make mental health a priority. I may or may not have an emotional breakdown during training — knowing that ahead of time and preparing for “the worst” in a sense will remind me to cut myself some slack when things don’t go according to plan. Don’t beat yourself up if you miss a run, or you don’t make a certain time, or you don’t feel your best on one of your training days; this is a marathon, not a sprint! Literally! Your commitment to this huge physical and mental goal is a gift to yourself; you’re celebrating your health and your body, so don’t get hung up on missteps or bumps in the road, and cherish every step on your journey to 26.2.

No Thumbnail

How to Take Care of Your Rotator Cuff

http://www.popsugar.com/fitness/Rotator-Cuff-Exercises-42852573

Thank You for visiting www.judgeweightloss.com. This is the spot for all of your fitness, workout, healthy lifestyle, supplement, and just general get healthy information. Enjoy

Having dislocated my shoulder multiple times in my 20s, I am quite familiar with the delicate group of muscles know as the rotator cuff since these are the muscles that help keep the joint intact. Made up of four muscles, the rotator cuff stabilizes the shoulder, which is a really mobile and complex ball-and-socket joint. When working out, chances are low you think about these muscles since they don’t really bulk up or add definition to your shoulders. Ahhh, but you should! They can be prone to overuse injuries, especially if you have tight pecs, which can compromise the shoulder joint, or do a lot of activities that involve overhead movement with force, like tennis, swimming, and weight lifting. Here are a few moves you can do to keep your rotator cuff supple and strong.

11138470

No Thumbnail

Getting to know Silvia Kramska

http://www.judgeweightloss.com

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

 

Think owning your own business takes grit? Multiply that by two, add the gruelling training demanded by fitness competitions and you have an idea of life for Silvia Kramska, founder of Open to Play clean protein and Real Food Organic Nutrition. A qualified nutritionist and strength and conditioning coach, Kramska shares her formula for keeping a balance amid apparent chaos.

I have always been part of an active environment centred on wellness. I started to play tennis when I was five years old and continued to play professionally until I was 17. I lost my way health-wise for a while after that, so when I moved to Melbourne I promised myself that I would work in an area that truly makes me happy.

My Open To Play protein business came about when I was prepping for my first fitness competition; I couldn’t find a clean, simple and healthy protein anywhere. I figured there must be other people struggling with the same issue and so I decided to create my own.

I’m proud to say that Open To Play proteins are now one of the cleanest products on the market. The products are designed to be a healthy addition to anyone’s diet – they’re all natural, have only three pure ingredients (including grass-fed whey), and are lactose and gluten free. 

I wanted to make sure the proteins were suitable for anyone no matter their age, gender or activity level. Natural protein can supplement your regular diet, assist in your recovery after exercise and can help support growth and repair of your muscles.

My everyday nutrition is very balanced. I love to start my day with lemon water and I place a lot of focus on the quality of the foods that are going into my body. I eat organically wherever possible and I don’t eat gluten or processed sugars.

I do enjoy my pancakes once a week, on the weekends. I think it’s important that your daily nutrition isn’t causing you stress and to accept that you won’t get it perfect every day.

My current training regimen reflects my off-season preparation and I am focusing on growing my upper body for competition. I am doing heavy upper-body sessions three times per week, and three leg sessions per week focusing on glute development. 

I like to incorporate at least two HIIT sessions per week into my training program depending on my energy levels. I always make sure I listen to my body and rest when I need it. 

I manage stress by soaking in a magnesium salt bath every single night. I also love taking time out to just relax at home, or head to the beach during summer with a good book. 

I wake up early every day because I like to get a training session in while everyone else is still in bed. I then head over to my café and help to set it up for the day, get my team motivated and post on my social media accounts. After work I will normally fit in another gym session and in the evening I make time for family and friends. 

I really admire Tracy Anderson as both a fitness advocate and entrepreneur. The way she has been able to grow her business and make a difference in people’s lives is really inspirational.

We are excited to be creating some tasty new flavours and products at Open To Play and I am also planning on opening two more Real Food Organic Nutrition Bars this year. 

 

{nomultithumb}

 

Read more …

Also check out http://healthywithjodi.com

default-poup