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Daily Archives: July 28, 2016

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Resistance band upright row

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Target your delts, biceps and traps with this upright row. All you need is a resistance band.

 

Perks: Sculpts shapely shoulders.

Move: Stand with both feet on top of the band, about hip-width apart and criss-cross the bands in each hand to create an ‘X’. Start with your arms down, palms/handles on top of thighs and a slight bend in your elbows. Keep the handles close to your body and pull them straight up towards your chest. Come up until your arms are parallel with the floor, pause for a second at the top, lower back down, and repeat.

(Fit Tip: Be sure that your elbows do not come up higher than 90 degrees, as this puts added strain on the rotator cuff.)

Words and workout by Ashley Azevedo.

Photography by James Patrick.

Check out these top 14 exercises for toned arms. 

 

 

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Resistance band bent over row

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Focus on your back muscles with this bent over row workout.

Targets: Lats, Rear Delts, Erector Spinae

Perks: Builds a strong, toned back and reinforces proper hip flexion. The bent-over row requires flexion at the hips and not the waist. This is often a strange and difficult position to get into for a beginner, but with practice and constant form checks the position will become second nature. (Fit Tip: Try to work out next to a mirror so you can see your form with every rep and ensure that proper form is being used throughout the entire workout.)

Move: Keep the bands in the same position as the upright row, but hinge your upper body forward at the hips to about a 45-degree angle. Start with your arms hanging down. Keep your elbows tucked close to your body as you pull the band back towards your waist. Pause at the top, lower the arms back down and repeat.

Words and workout by Ashley Azevedo.

Photography by James Patrick.

Check out these top 14 exercises for toned arms. 

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Full body resistance band workout

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Give your whole body a strength and cardio workout in one with Ashley Azevedo’s resistance band workout.

The workout

Circuit training simply means performing exercises back to back with little to no rest in between. Its elevator pitch is maximum perks in minimum time. Due to the fast-paced nature of circuit training, it elevates heart rate and couples cardio and strength training.

Even if you’re solely a weights girl, resistance bands are a great way to keep your body guessing and prevent plateaus. The resistance, reps and number of circuits can all be varied to meet your goals and fitness level.

What you need to do

Consider the list a sequence, not an a la carte menu. Perform a set (10 to 15 reps) of the first exercise and move immediately to the second exercise. Perform one set and move immediately to the third exercise and so on. Keep rests as short as possible. After you complete one full circuit, rest for about 60 seconds and start again. Available time and current fitness level will determine how many cycles you do, but aim for one to five.

(Fit tip: Don’t try to do too much too soon. It’s false economy.) Make sure you warm up the muscles you’ll use before any workout and cool down and stretch out afterwards to avoid injury and consult your doctor before starting any new training regimen.

Targets: Biceps, Delts

 

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Perks: This compound movement allows multiple muscle groups to be worked with one exercise, making it time efficient and adding to the difficulty of your workout. Sculpt the arms with this two-in-one exercise.

Move: Stand with both feet on top of the band, about hip-width apart.

(Fit Tip: You can control how easy or hard the exercise is by where you stand on the band to create more or less tension.) Start with both arms straight and begin to curl the arms up and towards the chest. Keep your elbows locked at your side. Once you get to the top of your curl, rotate your arms outward and turn your hands so palms are facing away. Press straight up, pause at the top, lower back down and repeat.

Words and workout by Ashley Azevedo.

Photography by James Patrick.

 

 

 

Upright row

 

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Targets: Delts, Biceps, Traps

Perks: sculpts shapely shoulders

Move: Stand with both feet on top of the band, about hip-width apart and criss-cross the bands in each hand to create an ‘X’. Start with your arms down, palms/handles on top of thighs and a slight bend in your elbows. Keep the handles close to your body and pull them straight up towards your chest. Come up until your arms are parallel with the floor, pause for a second at the top, lower back down, and repeat.

 

(Fit Tip: Be sure that your elbows do not come up higher than 90 degrees, as this puts added strain on the rotator cuff.)

Words and workout by Ashley Azevedo.

Photography by James Patrick.

 

 

 

 

 

Bent over row

 

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Targets: Lats, Rear Delts, Erector Spinae

Perks: Builds a strong, toned back and reinforces proper hip flexion. The bent-over row requires flexion at the hips and not the waist. This is often a strange and difficult position to get into for a beginner, but with practice and constant form checks the position will become second nature. (Fit Tip: Try to work out next to a mirror so you can see your form with every rep and ensure that proper form is being used throughout the entire workout.)

Move: Keep the bands in the same position as the upright row, but hinge your upper body forward at the hips to about a 45-degree angle. Start with your arms hanging down. Keep your elbows tucked close to your body as you pull the band back towards your waist. Pause at the top, lower the arms back down and repeat.

Words and workout by Ashley Azevedo.

Photography by James Patrick.

 

 

 

 

Glute kick-back

 

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Targets: Glutes, Hamstrings, Core

Perks: Tightens, strengthens and sculpts the backside.

Move: Starting on all fours, place the resistance band under one foot and hold one handle in each hand. Slowly kick back the foot that has the resistance band. Pause at the top and lower the leg back almost to starting position (but don’t drop the knee all the way back to the floor) and repeat.

 

Words and workout by Ashley Azevedo.

Photography by James Patrick.

 

 

 

 

Band squat

 

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Targets: Quads, Hamstrings, Glutes, Core

Perks: Squats are a compound exercise (using multiple muscle groups) that sculpt the legs and help shape the butt.

Move: Stand on your band with your feet about hip-width apart. (Fit Tip: The width of your stance can vary; find what is most comfortable for you. A wide stance works best for some while others find hip-width most comfortable.) Keep your head and chest up as you lower into a squat position. Return to a standing position and repeat.

Words and workout by Ashley Azevedo.

Photography by James Patrick.

 

 

 

 

One arm overhead tricep extension

 

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Targets: Triceps

Perks: Isolates, strengthens and tones the triceps (goodbye, wings!) 

Move: You’ll only need to grab one handle for this exercise, so step on the band at your desired tension level and let the other handle just stay on the floor. Start with your handle arm straight up overhead. Slowly bend your elbow, bringing the handle down towards your head and your arm into a 90-degree angle. Push up to the start position, pause at the top and repeat the lowering movement.

Words and workout by Ashley Azevedo.

Photography by James Patrick.

 

 

 

 

 

Tricep pushdowns

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Targets: Triceps

Perks: Allows you to isolate, strengthen and tone the triceps.

Move: Find something sturdy and stable to loop your band around and grab one handle in each hand. Keep a slight bend in your knees and start with your arms in a 90-degree angle. Keep your elbows at your side as you push the handle down until your arms are straight (but don’t lock your elbows). Your forearm should be the only part of your body moving with this exercise – make sure you keep the upper arm steady against your side. Pause for a second at the bottom and repeat.

Words and workout by Ashley Azevedo.

Photography by James Patrick.

 

 

 

 

 

Chest flys

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Targets: Pecs

Perks: Strengthens and tones the chest muscles (and improves hugging technique)! 

Move: Loop your band around a sturdy and stable object. Step one foot out in front of you and grab a handle in each hand, with your arms at chest level. Bring the bands forward so that your arms are straight (but don’t lock your elbows). Slowly return to the start position and repeat. The fly movement is similar to the movement you use when hugging someone.

 

 

Words and workout by Ashley Azevedo.

Photography by James Patrick.

 

Check out these top 14 exercises for toned arms. 

 

 

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The Sneaky Early Signs of Dementia You Should Know About

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Very early dementia may cause changes in personality and behavior—in ways that have nothing to do with memory loss, according to researchers who presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto on Sunday.

Older adults who have become uncharacteristically sad, irritable, anxious, rude, or disinterested in friends or family—and who have been that way for at least six months—could be exhibiting warning signs, they say.

The group of experts is proposing a new diagnosis, called Mild Behavioral Impairment (MBI), which could hopefully help doctors recognize brain changes that may lead to neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer’s disease. Identifying this progression sooner, they say, might help to pave the way for earlier treatments and better care for at-risk patients.

Along with the new diagnosis, the team also designed an “MBI Checklist” for doctors, which looks at behaviors involving the patient’s mood, level of motivation, impulse control, social appropriateness, and sensory experiences. Caregivers may also be able to use a version of the checklist once it’s finalized.

The checklist asks 34 questions about qualities that many people may recognize in the older adults in their lives. It suggests that doctors consider any behavior that has “been present for at least six months (continuously, or on and off) and is a change from her/his longstanding pattern of behavior.”

A few of these questions include:

• “Does the person lack curiosity in topics that would usually have attracted her/his interest?”

• “Has the person become more easily frustrated or impatient?”

• “Does the person seem to lack the social judgment she/he previously had about what to say or how to behave in public or private?”

• “Has the person developed suspiciousness about the intentions or motives of other people?”

Maria C. Carrillo, PhD, chief science officer, Alzheimer’s Association, said in a press release that the new checklist could help change the way doctors evaluate patients for possible early dementia.

“Alzheimer’s is a deadly brain disease, and while memory loss is a hallmark of the disease, early symptoms such as anxiety, confusion and disorientation are often more common, troubling, and obvious to family members,” she said.

It is important to note, however, that not every older adult who becomes cranky or loses interest in certain activities is on the road to dementia. And some experts do worry, the New York Times reports, that making MBI an official condition could lead to over-diagnosis, expensive and unnecessary treatments, and needless worry for patients and their loved ones.

Zahinoor Ismail, MD, a neuropsychiatrist at the University of Calgary and co-author of the proposed guidelines, says more research is required before the diagnosis and checklist can be put into practice.

“We are still in the very early stages of understanding this new syndrome,” he tells RealSimple.com. “Clinical trials still need to be set up to see if treating patients identified earlier this way makes a difference in terms of the time on onset of dementia.”

He is hopeful, however, that patients identified with MBI will be monitored more closely by their doctors; previously they might have been ignored.

And while patients and concerned family members shouldn’t jump to conclusions or self-diagnose, he does believe that a shift in a person’s mental or emotional state is worth checking out.

“Yes, later life changes in personality should be brought up with one’s doctor,” he says.

The new checklist isn’t the only exciting news coming out of the Alzheimer’s Association conference this week. Additional new and novel ways the disease may soon be detected earlier have been proposed, as well.

For example, University of Waterloo scientists unveiled a non-invasive eye-scan technology that may help recognize dementia-specific proteins in the brain before a person develops symptoms. And a team from Columbia University reported that a scratch-and-sniff smell identification test might also be useful in predicting cognitive decline.

 

This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

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Pesto-Pork Pinwheels with Grilled Peaches

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The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

Pesto-Pork Pinwheels with Grilled Peaches Recipe
Pesto-Pork Pinwheels with Grilled Peaches
Slicing the pesto-and-breadcrumb-stuffed pork before skewering helps these pinwheels cook quickly and brown evenly. Serve this with grilled or roasted broccolini and farro for a healthy dinner.

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The Ice Bucket Challenge Helped Researchers Find a Key ALS Gene

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Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

It was two summers ago that our Facebook feeds were full of videos of friends and family dumping buckets of ice-cold water over their heads to raise money and awareness for ALS—Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis—also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Now we can officially say that the social media stunt has made a real-world difference. 

The ALS Association announced this week that scientists have discovered a new ALS gene, NEK1, that's one of the most common genes linked to the neurodegenerative disease, and a potential new target for treatment. This breakthrough research, published in the journal Nature Genetics, is part of Project MinE, which aims to sequence the genomes of 15,000 people with ALS—​an international effort that recieved $1 million in #IceBucketChallenge donations.

RELATED: The Story Behind the Ice Bucket Videos All Over Your Facebook Feed

“The sophisticated gene analysis that led to this finding was only possible because of the large number of ALS samples available,” said ALS Association chief scientist Lucie Bruijn, PhD, in a press release. “The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge enabled The ALS Association to invest in Project MinE’s work to create large biorepositories of ALS biosamples that are designed to allow exactly this kind of research and to produce exactly this kind of result.”

As the Ice Bucket Challenge began to sweep across the nation in 2014, it was criticized as a classic example of "slacktivism," or activism that requires little actual effort (like signing an online petition, for example, or championing a cause in your Facebook status). 

But in just eight weeks, donations to the ALS Association climbed to $115 million and generated worldwide awareness and support for people affected by the debilitating disease. Since that summer, researchers from all over the globe have identified several ALS genes thanks to funding from the ALS Association that resulted from the viral challenge.

RELATED: Why Everyone on Facebook Is Taking the #22Pushups Challenge

John Landers, PhD, one of the lead researchers on the new study called the discovery of NEK1 "a prime example of the success that can come from the combined efforts of so many people, all dedicated to finding the causes of ALS."

This August, the ALS Association is launching a new campaign to generate funds and awareness. Visit the site to learn more about Every Drop Adds Up.

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