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Daily Archives: June 15, 2016

Full-body succession workout

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Designed to faciliate optimal body composition to burn maximum calories, this workout will help you build strength and tone. 

 

 

 

succession-training

The circuit training component targets muscular endurance and improves cardiovascular fitness by working the heart and lungs at a higher rate. It involves performing one set of each exercise with little or no rest in between until all the exercises have been completed.

 

“Traditional-style (succession) strength programs are when all sets of the first exercise are performed before progressing to the next exercise,” says trainer Nichelle Laus.

“By adding a succession routine to your current full-body circuit, it will help in maximising your strength and adding lean muscle mass.”

 

When choosing your dumbbell weight, err on the heavy side. “Succession programs generally use higher weights than circuit training,” Laus says. “This is key to building metabolically active lean tissue.”

 

What you’ll need:

» Workout bench

» 1 set of medium to heavy dumbbells

What you’ll do:

For Day 1 

Start with the Upper Body exercises. Perform one set of each exercise, then move on to the next exercise without rest. At the end of the Lower Body exercises, rest one minute, then repeat for a total of three circuits.

For toning, aim at 12 to 15 reps for each exercise.

For increasing strength and maximising muscular power, aim for 10 to 12 reps for each exercise.

For Day 2 

Start with the Lower Body exercises. Perform one set of each exercise, then move on to the next exercise without rest. At the end of the Upper Body exercises, rest one minute, then repeat for a total of three circuits.

For toning, aim at 12 to 15 reps for each exercise.

For increasing strength and maximising muscular power, aim for 10 to 12 reps for each exercise.

For Day 3 

Start with the Upper or Lower Body exercises. Complete three sets of the first exercise before moving on to the next. Repeat until all the exercises of the Upper and Lower Body exercises have been completed.

For toning, aim at 12 to 15 reps for each exercise, resting 60 seconds in between sets. For increasing strength and maximising muscular power, aim for 10 to 12 reps for each exercise, resting 90 seconds in between sets.

Exercises:

Upper Body

•Shoulder Press

•One-Arm Dumbbell Row

•Alternate Incline Dumbbell Bicep Curl

•Bench Dips

•Decline Push-ups

Lower Body

•Bench Hops

•Prone Glute Lifts

•Step-up with Knee Raise

Let’s get started!

Model: Chanel Sabovitch 

Words: Nichelle Laus

Photography: Dave Laus // davelaus.com

Shot on location at: Studio Two22

Hair and make-up: Two Chicks & Some Lipstick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shoulder presses (shoulder, triceps)

dumbellshoulder_succession.jpg

 

Hold a dumbbell in each hand and sit on a bench, with back support if possible.

Plant your feet firmly on the floor hip-width apart. Bend your elbows and raise your upper arms to shoulder height so the dumbbells are at ear level. Push the dumbbells up and in until the ends of the dumbbells touch lightly above your head. Lower back down to the starting position and repeat for amount of desired repetitions.

 

 

 

One-arm dumbbell row (middle back, biceps)

 

onearmdumbell-succession.jpg

 

Place a dumbbell on the left-hand side at one end of a flat bench.

Position yourself on the left side of a flat bench with your right knee and right hand resting on the bench.

Pick up the dumbbell with your left hand using a neutral grip. Slowly pull the dumbbell up as far as possible.

Pause and squeeze your shoulder blades together, and then slowly lower the dumbbell back to the starting position.

Repeat for amount of desired repetitions, and then repeat for your other side

 

 

 

 

Alternate incline dumbbell bicep curls (biceps)

 

alternateincline-succession.jpg

 

Grab a pair of dumbbells and sit down on an incline bench positioned at a 45-degree angle. Pull your shoulder blades back and let the dumbbells hang at your sides with your palms facing forward.

Curl one of the dumbbells up, bending the elbow and bringing the weight to your shoulder. Pause, then lower your arm back to starting position. Repeat for the amount of desired repetitions. Repeat with the other arm. 

 

 

 

 

Bench dips (triceps)

 

benchdips-succession.jpg

 

 

Position your hands shoulder-width apart on a secured bench. Move your feet out as far out in front of you as possible. Straighten out your arms and keep a little bend in your elbows in order to always keep tension on your triceps and off your elbow joints. Slowly lower your upper body down towards the floor and keep your elbows tucked into your sides. Once you reach the bottom of the movement, slowly press off with your hands and push yourself back up to the starting position with your triceps. Repeat for desired amount of repetitions.

 

 

 

Decline push ups (chest)

 

decline-pushups.jpg

 

Get in the standard push-up position with your feet elevated on a bench (or other surface) and hands slightly wider than shoulder width. Your elbows should be completely locked out. While keeping your body straight, lower your chest to the floor. Pause and push back to the starting position. Repeat for desired amount of repetitions.

 

 

Bench hops (quads, glutes, core)

 

benchhops-succession.jpg

 

Stand to one side of a flat bench with feet together. Holding the front of the bench, lean your weight into your hands and keep your feet together. Quickly jump up and over the bench. As soon as your feet touch the ground, jump back again. Continue jumping back and forth for desired amount of repetitions.

 

 

Step-ups with knee raise (glutes, hamstrings, quads)

 

stepups-succession.jpg

 

 

Stand facing a bench with your feet together. Step up, putting your left foot on the top of the bench. Extend through the hip and knee of your front leg to stand up on the bench. As you stand on the bench with your left leg, flex your right knee and hip, bringing your knee as high as you can. Reverse this motion to step down off the bench, and repeat the sequence on the opposite leg. Repeat for the desired amount of repetitions.

 

 

Prone glute lifts (glutes, hamstrings)

 

glute1-succession.jpg

glute2-succession.jpg

 

Lie face down on a flat bench, hands holding under the front of bench.

Lift both legs upward and extend them in a ‘V’ position, keeping feet about six inches (15 cm) from the bench, squeezing the glutes until your lower abdomen is slightly elevated from the bench. Lower down and repeat for desired amount of repetitions. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How Your iPhone Photos Make You Happier

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The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

Photography was once an expensive, laborious ordeal reserved for life’s greatest milestones. Now, the only apparent cost to taking infinite photos of something as mundane as a meal is the space on your hard drive (and your dining companion’s patience).

But is there another cost, a deeper cost, to documenting a life experience instead of simply enjoying it? “You hear that you shouldn’t take all these photos and interrupt the experience, and it’s bad for you, and we’re not living in the present moment,” says Kristin Diehl, associate professor of marketing at the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business.

Diehl and her fellow researchers wanted to find out if that was true, so they embarked on a series of nine experiments in the lab and in the field testing people’s enjoyment in the presence or absence of a camera. The results, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, surprised them. Taking photos actually makes people enjoy what they’re doing more, not less.

“What we find is you actually look at the world slightly differently, because you’re looking for things you want to capture, that you may want to hang onto,” Diehl explains. “That gets people more engaged in the experience, and they tend to enjoy it more.”

Take sightseeing. In one experiment, nearly 200 participants boarded a double-decker bus for a tour of Philadelphia. Both bus tours forbade the use of cell phones but one tour provided digital cameras and encouraged people to take photos. The people who took photos enjoyed the experience significantly more, and said they were more engaged, than those who didn’t.

Snapping a photo directs attention, which heightens the pleasure you get from whatever you’re looking at, Diehl says. It works for things as boring (sorry, as educational) as archaeological museums, where people were given eye-tracking glasses and instructed either to take photos or not. “People look longer at things they want to photograph,” Diehl says. They report liking the exhibits more, too.

To the relief of Instagrammers everywhere, it can even makes meals more enjoyable. When people were encouraged to take at least three photos while they ate lunch, they were more immersed in their meals more than those who weren’t told to take photos.

Was it the satisfying click of the camera? The physical act of the snap? No, they found; just the act of planning to take a photo—and not actually taking it—had the same joy-boosting effect. “If you want to take mental photos, that works the same way,” Diehl says. “Thinking about what you would want to photograph also gets you more engaged.”

But don’t expect to enjoy yourself more by simply strapping on a GoPro and recording your life. “That kind of technology we don’t think will have any effect,” Diehl says. “It’s when you actively decide what you what to take photos of that you get more engaged.”

This article originally appeared on Time.com.

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