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Monthly Archives: May 2016

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Two-Pepper Shrimp with Creamy Pecorino Oats

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Two-Pepper Shrimp with Creamy Pecorino Oats Recipe
Two-Pepper Shrimp with Creamy Pecorino Oats
Oats are not just for breakfast! In this play on shrimp & grits, we simmered oats with scallions and cheese for a savory, creamy dish reminiscent of risotto. You’ll even get your veggies with the sautéed baby spinach on the side. Serve with hot sauce and a glass of unoaked Chardonnay.

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ADHD May Not Show Up Until Adulthood, Study Finds

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When you think of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), you might picture a little kid who can't sit still in school. Turns out that for some people, ADHD symptoms may not appear until young adulthood, according to a new study published in JAMA Psychiatry. 

Researchers from King's College London looked at about 2,200 twins at ages 5, 7, 10, and 12 through mother and teacher reports. Then, when the twins reached age 18, the twins were interviewed and assessed for ADHD—defined by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as “a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that interferes with functioning or development in two or more settings." 

Of the subjects who were showing ADHD symptoms at age 18, 70% of them had not tested positive for ADHD during childhood. Although it's well established that childhood ADHD can continue into adulthood, this is among the first studies to examine late-onset ADHD. 

“This group showed significant levels of ADHD symptoms and impairment, as well as poor functioning and high rates of psychiatric comorbidity,” the authors write. “Therefore the absence of a childhood diagnosis of ADHD should not preclude adults with ADHD from receiving clinical attention.”

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Stuffed Avocados

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Stuffed Avocados Recipe
Stuffed Avocados
Forget the bread; next time you're serving chicken (or seafood or tuna) salad for lunch, try mounding it in an avocado half instead.

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Teens Who Eat More Saturated Fat May Develop Denser Breasts

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New research suggests there's a link between the amount of saturated fat girls consume as teenagers and their breast density later in life.

For the study, published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, researchers had 177 girls between the ages of 10 and 18 fill out questionnaires about their diet on five occasions. When the participants were between the ages of 25 and 29, the researchers measured their breast density using an MRI scan.

RELATED: 25 Breast Cancer Myths, Busted

They found that women who had eaten higher amounts of saturated fat—the kind found in meat and dairy products such as cheese, butter, and milk—as teens had denser breasts in their 20s. (Those who had consumed the most saturated fat had an average "dense breast volume" of 21.5%; while those who ate the least had an average dense breast volume of 16.4%.)

The opposite was true for women who had consumed higher amounts of healthful unsaturated fats—the type in olive oil, avocados, nut butters, and fatty fish like salmon—during their teen years. These women had lower breast density in their 20s.

The data suggest that what teenage girls eat matters well into adulthood. "If confirmed, [our] results indicate that adolescent diet could potentially have long-term effects on breast health," says senior author Joanne Dorgan, PhD, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.

RELATED: 13 Healthy High-Fat Foods You Should Eat More

Denser breasts contain more fibrous or glandular tissue, which can make it harder for radiologists to spot tumors on a mammogram. Denser breast tissue is also thought to raise a woman's odds of developing breast cancer. 

But research on the link between breast density and cancer risk is ongoing. Last winter, researchers from Croatia evaluated thousands of mammogram reports and did not find a substantial difference in breast density among women who were diagnosed with breast cancer and those who were not.

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New CDC Report Will Make You Rethink Swimming in the Local Pool

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There’s a reason your mom warned you not to drink the pool water when you were a kid—and hopefully you listened. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 78.9% of routine inspections of public swimming facilities identified at least one violation. And one in eight inspections led to immediate closure because of a “serious threat to public health.”

But that doesn’t necessarily mean there was fecal matter in the pool. After the CDC reviewed 2013 data from more than 84,000 pools, hot tubs, and water parks (hello, lazy river!) in five states, they documented the most common violations.

The number one problem cited by inspectors? The water's pH. Maintaining a proper pH is critical for controlling bacteria and preventing outbreaks of gastrointestinal illnesses. Another recent CDC report attributed 69 outbreaks of illness to treated recreational water sources (such as pools and hot tubs) between 2011 and 2012.

RELATED: How to Stock a Smart First Aid Kit

The second most common type of violation was related to safety equipment (think rescue rings and poles) meant to minimize drowning risk.

And the third most frequent issue was the concentration of disinfectant present in the water. The level needs to be precise to keep the water clean without causing side effects, such as eye irritation. And that can be serious business: The CDC points out that health problems associated with pool chemicals (such as burns and breathing difficulties) send thousands of people to the ER each year.

So what can you do to stay safe at your local pool this summer? In a press release, Michele Hlavsa, the chief of the CDC’s Healthy Swimming Program, urges you to look for the facility's inspection results online, and do your own inspection before diving in.

The first step on the CDC's checklist is to test the pH of the water (should be between 7.2 and 7.8) and concentration of free chlorine (at least 1 ppm) or bromine (at least 3 ppm) using test strips that are available at most superstores and pool-supply stores. 

​RELATED: How to Get a Perfect Fake Sun Tan

Next, make sure that you can see the drain in the deep end. That’s a good indicator of the visibility in the water. The clearer it is, the easier it is for others to see you if you need help. 

Also check that the drain covers are secure and in good shape, because a loose or broken cover can trap swimmers underwater, according to the CDC.

And finally, if there’s no lifeguard on duty, locate the rescue ring or pole so you know it’s available, just in case anyone gets into trouble.

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New CDC Report Will Make You Rethink Swimming in the Local Pool

www.judgeweightloss.com

The place to come for fitness, weight loss, supplement, and just awesome health info.

Thanks for visiting. Enjoy

There’s a reason your mom warned you not to drink the pool water when you were a kid—and hopefully you listened. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 78.9% of routine inspections of public swimming facilities identified at least one violation. And one in eight inspections led to immediate closure because of a “serious threat to public health.”

But that doesn’t necessarily mean there was fecal matter in the pool. After the CDC reviewed 2013 data from more than 84,000 pools, hot tubs, and water parks (hello, lazy river!) in five states, they documented the most common violations.

The number one problem cited by inspectors? The water's pH. Maintaining a proper pH is critical for controlling bacteria and preventing outbreaks of gastrointestinal illnesses. Another recent CDC report attributed 69 outbreaks of illness to treated recreational water sources (such as pools and hot tubs) between 2011 and 2012.

RELATED: How to Stock a Smart First Aid Kit

The second most common type of violation was related to safety equipment (think rescue rings and poles) meant to minimize drowning risk.

And the third most frequent issue was the concentration of disinfectant present in the water. The level needs to be precise to keep the water clean without causing side effects, such as eye irritation. And that can be serious business: The CDC points out that health problems associated with pool chemicals (such as burns and breathing difficulties) send thousands of people to the ER each year.

So what can you do to stay safe at your local pool this summer? In a press release, Michele Hlavsa, the chief of the CDC’s Healthy Swimming Program, urges you to look for the facility's inspection results online, and do your own inspection before diving in.

The first step on the CDC's checklist is to test the pH of the water (should be between 7.2 and 7.8) and concentration of free chlorine (at least 1 ppm) or bromine (at least 3 ppm) using test strips that are available at most superstores and pool-supply stores. 

​RELATED: How to Get a Perfect Fake Sun Tan

Next, make sure that you can see the drain in the deep end. That’s a good indicator of the visibility in the water. The clearer it is, the easier it is for others to see you if you need help. 

Also check that the drain covers are secure and in good shape, because a loose or broken cover can trap swimmers underwater, according to the CDC.

And finally, if there’s no lifeguard on duty, locate the rescue ring or pole so you know it’s available, just in case anyone gets into trouble.

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